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Ferrari 430 vs Lambo Gallardo - Page 5

post #61 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mblova View Post
+1 and I find 360's to be much more popular. The 355 is a more of a rarity esp currently. But hey, its all about what you like.

Not really, they made 10,000 F355s so by Ferrari standards they are not exactly rare.
post #62 of 89
It kinda depends what other cars I had. If I had to choose a daily, and wasn't going to the track very often, it would probably be the Gallardo. While AWD isn't as good on a track, if you plan on some spirited driving then random, unpredictable road surfaces then AWD might just save you from a nasty crash. They're also handy in the wet. I agree that RWD is still very good on a track, where the road is predictable, but AWD is showing more and more that it can compete, and even win with it's extra traction, despite the extra weight. Having said all that, I don't think I could go past the Ferrari. It's a Ferrari for crying out loud! Though, I would rather an Aston Martin V8 Vantage or DB9. More style, less wank factor. Slower yes, but while fast is good you can't really use it on the road. And with the money you save getting a V8 vantage, you could import a Japanese RX7 or R34 GT-R, strip it out and add a roll cage and have yourself a track car and a road car for the same money. I really like the R8 too, even though it is a little slower 0-100km/h. At the end of the day I haven't driven any of these cars unfortunately, and behind the wheel is really where I would choose which one I want based on how much fun it is.
post #63 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shraka View Post
It kinda depends what other cars I had. If I had to choose a daily, and wasn't going to the track very often, it would probably be the Gallardo. While AWD isn't as good on a track, if you plan on some spirited driving then random, unpredictable road surfaces then AWD might just save you from a nasty crash. They're also handy in the wet. I agree that RWD is still very good on a track, where the road is predictable, but AWD is showing more and more that it can compete, and even win with it's extra traction, despite the extra weight. Having said all that, I don't think I could go past the Ferrari. It's a Ferrari for crying out loud! Though, I would rather an Aston Martin V8 Vantage or DB9. More style, less wank factor. Slower yes, but while fast is good you can't really use it on the road. And with the money you save getting a V8 vantage, you could import a Japanese RX7 or R34 GT-R, strip it out and add a roll cage and have yourself a track car and a road car for the same money. I really like the R8 too, even though it is a little slower 0-100km/h. At the end of the day I haven't driven any of these cars unfortunately, and behind the wheel is really where I would choose which one I want based on how much fun it is.
Shraka,

I agree with everything you have said....

and at the end of the day, I too would choose the Aston Vantage, it just has more style.
post #64 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by wt888 View Post
Not really, they made 10,000 F355s so by Ferrari standards they are not exactly rare.
You're correct, the 360 is the replacement for the 355, as well as the 430 for the 360.

In the eyes of some of the Ferrari purists, neither of the cars will be amongst the more collectible F-cars, due to the mass (atleast in Ferrari standards) production.

All said and done, if given the choice I would still likely choose the 355 over the 360, based on looks alone.
post #65 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern-Nupe View Post
You're correct, the 360 is the replacement for the 355, as well as the 430 for the 360.

In the eyes of some of the Ferrari purists, neither of the cars will be amongst the more collectible F-cars, due to the mass (atleast in Ferrari standards) production.

All said and done, if given the choice I would still likely choose the 355 over the 360, based on looks alone.

Agree. Neither is collectable. The only 8 cylinder Ferraris that are collectable are the early fiberglass 308 GTBs, 288 GTO, and F40.
post #66 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by wt888 View Post
Agree. Neither is collectable. The only 8 cylinder Ferraris that are collectable are the early fiberglass 308 GTBs, 288 GTO, and F40.
Why did you have to mention the GTB's and GTO's...such beautiful cars.

......I completely forgot the F40's were 8 cyl's
post #67 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by wt888 View Post
Agree. Neither is collectable. The only 8 cylinder Ferraris that are collectable are the early fiberglass 308 GTBs, 288 GTO, and F40.
Wait long enough and it will be worth a bit. If you have a mint condition 355, I bet you could now sell it for more than you bought it. I think the same will apply to the F430 and 360, once the terrible treatment most of their owners give them starts to make them fall apart. As an example of how some people treat Ferrari's, a friend of mine's boss has a Ferrari 360. He services it at a place I wouldn't service my Honda, and after leaving it sitting for a month, turns it over and does a burnout down his front driveway before the starter motor has finished spinning down. Abuse any car like that and it will prematurely show it's age, let alone a highly strung Italian Supercar. They're no in th same league as the Dino or Enzo are which are instant classics, rising in value as soon as Ferrari hands you the keys, but they still collectible.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern-Nupe View Post
Why did you have to mention the GTB's and GTO's...such beautiful cars. ......I completely forgot the F40's were 8 cyl's
It's turbocharged though, so it really is more like a V10 or V12 as far as power output. You can say the R34 GT-R is only 6 cylinders, but it also has two sequentially run turbochargers, which changes the ball game.
post #68 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shraka View Post
They're no in th same league as the Dino or Enzo are which are instant classics, rising in value as soon as Ferrari hands you the keys, but they still collectible.

Don't new Ferraris still do this? I know that a while ago in certain parts of the country, dealers would offer to buy back low mileage current models at above MSRP so that they could sell them for way above MSRP. It was something about the factory not liking dealers selling new Ferraris over MSRP.

Other places I know make you jump through hoops to get on the list for a new car. Some places treat Maseratis like starter cars --- you buy one to prove your commitment, and they let you buy a new Ferrari later. Still other places would just offer to flip your current Ferrari (assuming it's like new and low mileage) for a new one with very little to no depreciation just so they can get a good condition used one to sell at insane prices.

--Andre
post #69 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern-Nupe View Post
Why did you have to mention the GTB's and GTO's...such beautiful cars.

......I completely forgot the F40's were 8 cyl's

And fairly small engien sizes by US standards (just under 3 liters). Depending on the tuning an F40 will output 480-750 horsepower. Given that they only weight about 2300lbs, it is a very quick car.
post #70 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern-Nupe View Post
Why did you have to mention the GTB's and GTO's...such beautiful cars.

......I completely forgot the F40's were 8 cyl's

And fairly small engine sizes by US standards (just under 3 liters). Depending on the tuning an F40 will output 480-750 horsepower. Given that they only weight about 2300lbs, it is a very quick car.
post #71 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre Yew View Post
Don't new Ferraris still do this? I know that a while ago in certain parts of the country, dealers would offer to buy back low mileage current models at above MSRP so that they could sell them for way above MSRP. It was something about the factory not liking dealers selling new Ferraris over MSRP.


--Andre
In some cases, especially the Spyders....primarily because they are difficult to get at times. As far as appreciation, the same is true for Ford GT's and Gallardo's as well.

When I speak of the car being a collectible, I'm speaking in terms of the rarer Ferrari's, especially of the past, i.e. GTO's, Daytona's and even the Testarossa's. You never know the way the market may turn out, but there will likely be a glass ceiling in the future of how much people will pay for them in comparision to their Enzo brethren.

Speaking of Ferrari, I was just in the store, and happened to run across one of the mags with the potential future Maranello on the cover.....needless to say, I haven't been this impressed, since the 575 Maranello's of years past.

....and like you said, some F-car dealers are very strict about their selling policies, or atleast it was that way for the Enzo's.
post #72 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern-Nupe View Post
....and like you said, some F-car dealers are very strict about their selling policies, or atleast it was that way for the Enzo's.

Weren't initial Enzo sales by invitation only? That is, to buy one, you had to be asked by the factory first. I guess by now there are brokers who can get you an Enzo if you wanted one.

--Andre
post #73 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre Yew View Post
Weren't initial Enzo sales by invitation only? That is, to buy one, you had to be asked by the factory first. I guess by now there are brokers who can get you an Enzo if you wanted one.

--Andre

Yes. If I recall correctly the process was started with the F50, where you needed to own at least 2 Ferrari's and be "˜known' by the local dealer, whatever this means.

Nowadays, there are enough pre-owned Enzo's out there, that you can easily buy one (by "˜easily' I mean relative to your means...)

Jon.
post #74 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
Nowadays, there are enough pre-owned Enzo's out there, that you can easily buy one (by "˜easily' I mean relative to your means...)

Jon.
Very true,

Prices on Enzo's are astronomical, especially given their limited production numbers, and decreased existing cars (not everyone should be behind the wheel of this car....i.e. Eddie Griffith).
post #75 of 89
Eddie Griffth's crash was speculated to be a PR stunt for whatever movie was coming out at the time. On the other hand, the schmuck who used to be the CEO of Gizmondo, he should not have been behind the wheel of any car.
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