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Dyeing shoes

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Has anyone here ever re-dyeing their shoes to a much darker colour? What are the best leather dye products available out there?
post #2 of 20
Quote:
Has anyone here ever re-dyeing their shoes to a much darker colour? What are the best leather dye products available out there?
Try looking here...(its an antiquing process but you may be able to applty the concept to what you want) http://www.styleforum.net/cgi-bin....2;st=22 Other's may have better information. JJF
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
FIH, I was the one who started asking A. Harris about his antiquing technique. I'm hoping to do a lasting, permanent colouring job to a pale brown shoes and thinking to experiment with re-dyeing.
post #4 of 20
Quote:
FIH, I was the one who started asking A. Harris about his antiquing technique. I'm hoping to do a lasting, permanent colouring job to a pale brown shoes and thinking to experiment with re-dyeing.
Ooops... I didnt see that part of the thread as J only liked that page. Mi Scusi. Enjoy your thanksgiving. JJF
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Has anyone here ever re-dyeing their shoes to a much darker colour
You will need De-Glazer, Feibings Dye, a couple of daubers and some newspaper. Take out the laces, stuff shoes with newspaper tightly. With a rag, deglaze per instructions on can. Wearing rubber gloves, start applying dye with dauber at toe (I start above the welt), working quickly across the shoe from left to right. Let dry overnight, rub out the first coat and re-apply. After a few hours, start applying polish - 2 or 3 coats. If you are looking for an antiqued effect, you will need to rub off the dye almost immediatly, and work with rags instead of daubers. This takes some practice to get right. If you have some old shoes to work on first, that would be best. If not, pick something up cheap at a thrift store before dying your shoes.
post #6 of 20
Oil based or spirit based dye? I wonder what would happen if I stripped a pair of black shoes and dyed them dark brown? Could be cool, I'll have to try that...
post #7 of 20
You can only dye darker. Going lighter requires paint.
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Oil based or spirit based dye?
Uhm, care to enlighten me on the strengths and weaknesses of each? And thanks Rider for the quick tutorial.
post #9 of 20
Rider's method sounds right to me. A few years ago, I used common shoe store shoe-dye to change the color of a pair of loafers from a cordovan color to black.
post #10 of 20
Quote:
You can only dye darker. Going lighter requires paint.
Apparently you can bleach (strip) out the color, even black, with acetone (ending up with some dirty grey). Then you can apply either burgundy or navy and you will end up with something like this: No, I've never tried it. But the result in that picture is so attractive that I might go out on the weekend to find a cheap pair in a thrift shop to practice on.
post #11 of 20
Wow, great result. Where does one get this dye?
post #12 of 20
Also, where can you get the De-Glazer? I am not happy with the colour on a pair of burgandy wingtips. If I could get more of a dark brown shade with a hint of burgandy I would be happy. Any info appreciated.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
where can you get the De-Glazer?v
Go to your local repair shop, and ask them to order it from their jobber for you. they should not have any problem doing this for you.
post #14 of 20
Thanks. I will go tomorrow and order some.
post #15 of 20
Deglazer is generally acetone, which you can find in quart containers at any hardware store. I have acetone-stripped several pairs of black shoes (in fact I customarily strip any grain correction off of a new pair of shoes), and have NEVER found that black color comes off or turns gray. So although I don't think stripping a pair of black shoes will hurt them, I don't think you'll be able to recolor them either. With black, you're stuck with black.
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