or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › What are your 10 favorite cities in the world?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What are your 10 favorite cities in the world? - Page 7

post #91 of 247
Thread Starter 
Yes you can read the signs but what significance does Nepszinhaz utca have to most people who don't speak Hungarian? I estimate about 5-10% of the people in Budapest actually speak English, I think the total in Tokyo is probably closer to 50%, and at least 25%. Anyone under the age of 30 should speak English fairly well, I have quite a few employees that emigrated here to take jobs directly from Tokyo and hadn't been outside of the US, their English is not too hard to understand. Older Hungarians may speak French or German, the younger ones are more likely to speak Slavic languages (mostly Russian) Remember, under the 40 years of Soviet rule, they didn't teach much French or German in Hungary.
post #92 of 247
Quote:
Remember, under the 40 years of Soviet rule, they didn't teach much French or German in Hungary.
Really? They taught German in Polish school during the same period of history. You had to be able to communicate with the brothers in the Democratic Republic... I talked in German with my cousins in Poland when I visited. It was the one language we all had in common.
post #93 of 247
Quote:
Quote:
(drizzt3117 @ Feb. 23 2005,13:01) Remember, under the 40 years of Soviet rule, they didn't teach much French or German in Hungary.
Really? They taught German in Polish school during the same period of history.  You had to be able to communicate with the brothers in the Democratic Republic...  I talked in German with my cousins in Poland when I visited. It was the one language we all had in common.
although I find german is becoming less common in central europe and the balkans. 15 years ago it was lingua franca in a lot of that area, now you don't find young people who speak it.
post #94 of 247
Quote:
Japanese are one of the most racist people. Exemple = they have no jews and many of them declare not no like jews...
Yeah, at least France doesn't have any problems with anti-semitism. The only prejudice/racism I have ever heard from Japanese people is against the Chinese, and even that has been very limited.
post #95 of 247
Quote:
Quote:
(ernest @ Feb. 22 2005,20:28) Japanese are one of the most racist people. Exemple = they have no jews and many of them declare not no like jews...
Yeah, at least France doesn't have any problems with anti-semitism. The only prejudice/racism I have ever heard from Japanese people is against the Chinese, and even that has been very limited.
sorry, bryce, japanese can be very..... lets say.... insular. I don't think this is a good reason to insult japan, but there is a huge amount of ..... insularism in japan. but I think that americans really don't expect to see racism in other parts of the world, as strong as it is.
post #96 of 247
Thread Starter 
This is true, however, most of my Hungarian friends have mentioned that they learned primarily Russian in school, with Hungarian still being the primary language that they listened to.
post #97 of 247
1. Istanbul mix of the east and west. Seat of THREE empires: Byzantine, Constantine and Ottoman. Amazing food, cheap and not too sanitized for tourists. 2. Cities on the old silk route and cities off this route in northern China. Once again a mix, this time of chinese and Turkish cultures. Turkish spoken but unlike Turkey and Turkemanistan etc, still written in arabic script. Amaxzing coloured mosaic domes next to stark commie blandness. more to come
post #98 of 247
I'm not going to even comment on the racism (or insularity) of the Japanese people. I've seen, or been the victim of, the same thing in my own country. As have many black people or mexicans in the US, or Gypsies in Europe, or whatever. The only thing I can really think of that a westerner would be excluded from in Tokyo (because he's white) would be SOME of the "Gentleman's clubs". Since that isn't usually a problem for me - I automatically discount that as an issue. Perhaps its a different situation for some of you, but I don't intend to spend much of my time in foriegn cities inside nudie bars. As far as being able to read the signs in Tokyo - I've never had a problem with it. Many things are written in English. Almost all of the street signs in Tokyo are perfectly legible. Outside the major metro areas sometimes there is a problem with that, but in Tokyo I've never had a problem. There is an English subway map right next to, or around the corner from the Kanji one. And any decent guide book will have one in it anyways. Lets see - I distincly remember drizzt saying that he spent $3000 or so on dinner in LAS VEGAS. Yeah, you can spend that on dinner in Tokyo too. Or you can spend $10 on dinner in Tokyo. You can buy just about anything in shops in Tokyo that you can buy in the U.S. I don't see the problem. Knowing Tokyo, I'm sure there is a shop somewhere dedicated ONLY to the thousands or so varieties of goat cheese, and the whole price range and quality scale that goes with it. It would probably make your mouth water. Ernest, your assertion that ALL products in Japan are imported, thus expensive is not only incorrect, it would be economically unfeasible. The Japanese make some fine goat cheeses and wines BTW. Maybe not up to the standards of your superior french palette, but very good nonetheless. Imported v.s. domestic has very little to do with cost in many places and for many different things, in fact I remember noticing at a bar that beer imported from the US (and even some from Europe) was less expensive than some Japanese domestic. Of course, like everything else in asia, it depends on where you go for your food.
Quote:
Talk me about japanese food. What do they can in the morning most of time?
Are you asking me what Japanese people eat for breakfast? Well a traditional Japanese breakfast consists of Miso soup, rice, and possibly some fish. But by no means is that your only option. you can eat excellent fresh baked french pastries, omlettes, eggs benedict, pancakes, dim-sum, cereal, fresh fruit, scrambled eggs, sausages, a proper english breakfast, hashbrowns, whatever... thinking you have to eat sushi and rice three meals a day is ludicrous. I would be in real trouble in France, since I don't really like eating foie gras, escargo and drinking wine for every meal. Globetrotter -
Quote:
I would have a problem calling a city a great food city based entirly on imported cuisines
If thats the case, then SURELY there are no AMERICAN cities on your list of "great food cities" or are you suggesting that "american cuisine" (I.E. hamburgers, barbeque, hotdogs, pizza, Jello, etc) ranks among the worlds best?
post #99 of 247
Quote:
Yes you can read the signs but what significance does Nepszinhaz utca have to most people who don't speak Hungarian? I estimate about 5-10% of the people in Budapest actually speak English, I think the total in Tokyo is probably closer to 50%, and at least 25%.  Anyone under the age of 30 should speak English fairly well, I have quite a few employees that emigrated here to take jobs directly from Tokyo and hadn't been outside of the US, their English is not too hard to understand.  Older Hungarians may speak French or German, the younger ones are more likely to speak Slavic languages (mostly Russian)  Remember, under the 40 years of Soviet rule, they didn't teach much French or German in Hungary.
Russian have gone for long time (enough to allow a generation to speak English) In east of Europe many people have always spoken German particulary in Hungary (dont' forget the Autro-hungarian Empire and that East Germany was a model in the east bloc so many people learnt german). And people from east Europe are very talented for languages, much more than Japanese. Everybody under 30 years speaks English because English is everywhere (all movies on TV or cinema are in original version with subtitles). I think that in Japan (like in France) everything on TV is in Japanese (French).
post #100 of 247
Quote:
And people from east Europe are very talented for languages, much more than Japanese.
Wow, its good to know that. I'll tell the Japanese to stop wasting their time learning different languages, since all Eastern Europeans are inherently better at it. They will be sooo ashamed.
post #101 of 247
Quote:
Globetrotter -
Quote:
I would have a problem calling a city a great food city based entirly on imported cuisines
If thats the case, then SURELY there are no AMERICAN cities on your list of "great food cities" or are you suggesting that "american cuisine" (I.E. hamburgers, barbeque, hotdogs, pizza, Jello, etc) ranks among the worlds best?
well, what I usually eat in London or amsterdam is "imported" cuisines - usually chinese in london and surinamese in amsterdam. but nobody would call those great food cities. New york may be the only exception to the "rule" - the very scale of available and quality of varried cuisines stagers the mind. the main diference between new york and tokyo in this instance is that the best indian food in new york is made for indians who live in new york, the best chinese is made for chinese in new york, etc. in tokyo, the food preperation people are imported to make food for the japanese (and pardon my generalization, but it is close to perfect). you don't have a large indian population, or mexicn population in tokyo, and most of the expats are people who are not their for good. If I had to choose the best food cities in North America - New York would be on the very short list, but the others would be cities would strong indiginous cuisines - memphis, new orleans, san antonio
post #102 of 247
Thread Starter 
I agree to some degree with TS's comments: I think the Japanese as well as Chinese, and other Asian cultures, are somewhat more insular than European cultures, at least overtly so. The Chinese and Japanese both have terms that represent non-Chinese and non-Japanese people as inferior. While Western cultures may feel the same way, it's at least not as clearly stated. As far as costs, I think generally Tokyo is one of the most expensive cities in the world, but TS is right in saying that you can find expensive meals anywhere you go, and you can also find relatively inexpensive meals wherever you go. Finally, regarding cuisine, there actually is an "American-style" haute-cuisine, kind of a farm-fresh fusion cuisine that has been put into the limelight by the likes of Keller and Ogden, pretty good and interesting stuff, and quite different from French cuisine, although it is inspired by many different styles of cuisine from different cultures.
post #103 of 247
Quote:
Ernest, your assertion that ALL products in Japan are imported, thus expensive is not only incorrect, it would be economically unfeasible. The Japanese make some fine goat cheeses and wines BTW. Maybe not up to the standards of your superior french palette, but very good nonetheless. Imported v.s. domestic has very little to do with cost in many places and for many different things, in fact I remember noticing at a bar that beer imported from the US (and even some from Europe) was less expensive than some Japanese domestic. Of course, like everything else in asia, it depends on where you go for your food.
Quote:
Talk me about japanese food. What do they can in the morning most of time?
Are you asking me what Japanese people eat for breakfast? Well a traditional Japanese breakfast consists of Miso soup, rice, and possibly some fish. But by no means is that your only option. you can eat excellent fresh baked french pastries, omlettes, eggs benedict, pancakes, dim-sum, cereal, fresh fruit, scrambled eggs, sausages, a proper english breakfast, hashbrowns, whatever... thinking you have to eat sushi and rice three meals a day is ludicrous. I would be in real trouble in France, since I don't really like eating foie gras, escargo and drinking wine for every meal. Globetrotter -
Quote:
I would have a problem calling a city a great food city based entirly on imported cuisines
If thats the case, then SURELY there are no AMERICAN cities on your list of "great food cities" or are you suggesting that "american cuisine" (I.E. hamburgers, barbeque, hotdogs, pizza, Jello, etc) ranks among the worlds best?
Quote:
Ernest, your assertion that ALL products in Japan are imported, thus expensive is not only incorrect, it would be economically unfeasible.
Not ALL but 90% of them. Most of fructs, vegetables, weat... HOW MUCH IS AN APPLE?
Quote:
Are you asking me what Japanese people eat for breakfast? Well a traditional Japanese breakfast consists of Miso soup, rice, and possibly some fish
What Western guy wants ti eat this? None. I imagine you can eat western food too but why going to Tokyo to eat western food at a higher price than at home?
Quote:
I would be in real trouble in France, since I don't really like eating foie gras, escargo and drinking wine for every meal
Who told you it was the typical French lunch or diner? Nobody eats escargo and most of people eat foie gras 3/4 fois per years. The choice in French food (cheese, bread, hams, deserts...) or meals (each area has her very different dishes) is 100 time larger than in Japanese food. And we have many strangers who imported their own food.
post #104 of 247
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:
(drizzt3117 @ Feb. 23 2005,19:01) Yes you can read the signs but what significance does Nepszinhaz utca have to most people who don't speak Hungarian? I estimate about 5-10% of the people in Budapest actually speak English, I think the total in Tokyo is probably closer to 50%, and at least 25%. Anyone under the age of 30 should speak English fairly well, I have quite a few employees that emigrated here to take jobs directly from Tokyo and hadn't been outside of the US, their English is not too hard to understand. Older Hungarians may speak French or German, the younger ones are more likely to speak Slavic languages (mostly Russian) Remember, under the 40 years of Soviet rule, they didn't teach much French or German in Hungary.
Russian have gone for long time (enough to allow a generation to speak English) In east of Europe many people have always spoken German particulary in Hungary (dont' forget the Autro-hungarian Empire and that East Germany was a model in the east bloc so many people learnt german). And people from east Europe are very talented for languages, much more than Japanese. Everybody under 30 years speaks English because English is everywhere (all movies on TV or cinema are in original version with subtitles). I think that in Japan (like in France) everything on TV is in Japanese (French).
Umm, have you BEEN to budapest or hungary? While I believe more people speak German than English, most people there do not communicate well in either. The Russian occupation of Hungary ended only about 15 years ago, and the school systems did not immediately switch to a system which educates the speakers in English. Also, the Austro-Hungarian empire ended in 1919, and in the ~30 years between the wars, German was not taught in schools. I would say that Budapest has the lowest percentage of english speakers of any major European city (pop > 1M)
post #105 of 247
Quote:
As far as costs, I think generally Tokyo is one of the most expensive cities in the world, but TS is right in saying that you can find expensive meals anywhere you go, and you can also find relatively inexpensive meals wherever you go.
So how can you say it is an expensive city? Take the same average meal/same quality. What would be the price in Paris/NY/Tokyo.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › What are your 10 favorite cities in the world?