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What are your 10 favorite cities in the world? - Page 4

post #46 of 247
Thread Starter 
The only thing about Prague and Bratislava, as well as most of Eastern Europe, is be careful about your possessions as there are quite a few pickpockets there.
post #47 of 247
I'm not too far into my travel life, but here goes: 1. NYC. In addition to everything already mentioned, it's home for me. 2. New Orleans. The history, the energy, and it hasn't been mentioned yet. 3. Boston. American history at its best, the culture, the eclectic neighborhoods. Real sense of community among those who live there. 4. Positano. All the serenity that Sorrento lacks. As if it needed any more romanticism, Steinbeck and Harper's Bazaar. And the food. 5. Naples. Dirty, romantic, grimy, historic, and worth the visit just for the best damn pizza in the world. 6. Florence, narrowly over Rome. The DeMedicis as one family midwifed more creativity into the world than the entire living population today. 7. Paro because I've never experienced such complete and utter silence anywhere else in the world. Thimpu because seeing the government wheels turning is fascinating. Both because eight out of ten people have never even heard of Bhutan : ) The rest of the list is open...Tokyoslim you've piqued my curiosity for Tokyo, then there's Talinn and Sofia and Vienna for the ball season and Milan and Sao Paulo and Havana and Biarritz and Rio and...
post #48 of 247
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10. Manhattan - Vibrant and an epitomy of a culture. The partying scene leaves much to be desired. The food in terms of selection is simply amazing, but then again there is the quality, which is only just above average. Shopping is on a mamoth scale with Saks, Barneys, Bergdorf, etc. Individual botique shopping leaves much to be desired. 9. New Delhi - That is if you know people there, it can be the party capital of the world. It is quite a chill out city in the day, as for a man there is very little to do, rest some breathtaking sighteeing, but once you have done that, thats it, and in terms of shopping, pretty bad, unless you want to buy Zegna or Boss at 10 times the price, if you want to shop though, Stay away from Connaught Place, go to South Extention, Greater Kalish or 1 MG Road. Play a bit of golf, spend the day at the gym or spa at the Oberoi, but nothing you cannot do anywhere else, its the evening when the place comes alive at places like Fashion Bar, Float and Olive. 8. Birmingham - Although, after spending a few years there, in which I hated the place, I have realised that I was practialy the King of the City which cant be all bad. I would say, from a tourists perspective this place is appauling. There is a nice art gallery, some decent shopping at Selfridges and The Mailbox and a few nice idividual botiques in the Burlington Arcade, and Stephenson Street/Navigation Street. Some very nice restaraunts, especially if you take the ride out to Edgbaston to Jessica's , Malmasion Resteraunt and Paris in the Mailbox are also good, as for some of the most inovative oriental food, try Cafe Soya in the Arcadian. As for nightlife, forget it. It is pathetic. It's not the places that are bad, it's the croud, brummies are the most pathetic and boring people in the world. 7. Los Angelis/ Beverly Hills - Lifestyle I suppose, the arcitectre is appauling, but the shoppings pretty good, and the food has got a nice twist. 6. Milan - What a city, with the beautiful Dumo, and Michaleangelos works, and the food in Galereia Victoria Emanuel, oh and do not forget the shopping, oh the shopping on the golden triangle. Brera is very individual, and so quirky, a dirty canal, with painters and street vendors by its sides, and then wonderful small restaurants. The lakes Como and Garda and the Swiss border provide a nice bit of secenry as well as quaint towns. 5. Bombay/ Mumbai - Party to death, eat like a king, and have someone at your feet for your every whim and need. 4. Singapore - Amazingly vibrant, not the same charm it used to have though, greatly centralised on Orchard Road, so easy to get arround, a wide rage of things for all tastes. 3. Bangkok - Mosterous, paradise within an hour (costal towns) wide variey of shopping, excllent food. 2. Dubai - Arab party animals, alongside their South Asian and European counterparts. Good shopping, great deals on watches, amazing selection of food, pristine beach in the city, amazing hotels, amazingly well kept. Feel like you are in Manhattan one moment on Sheikh Zayed Road, then a couple of miles down you are on a beach in Jumeriah. 1. London - Need I go on...
I suppose a pattern with my choices tends to be cities that are very spread out, and require car travel; the exceptions being London, Singapore and perhaps Manhattan. I don't like Vienna, Paris, Rome, and cities like that not only for reasons individual to the respective cities, but also genrally due to the fact that they are very concentrated, and don't offer a great deal of variety. I don't like Paris because, although it is a very nice place, it is also quite ridiculous in some ways, you can try and shop for hours and not even be able to find the shop you want, I find this is the case in Manhattan as well, you know all the good shops are on 5th 57th and Madison, and in Soho, but the amount of walking drives me nuts. Paris, it seems like you have to travel across the city to go from one shop to the other, and without some serious use of Taxis, or renting a car and finding your way, and also Parking, you are pretty restricted. Food can be impecable, or it can be French people taking the piss out of a brit in their restaurants. It certainly is beautiful along the Seine, and near the Louvre, but I really cannot see any charm to the Eifel Tower. I will continue later.
post #49 of 247
Thread Starter 
If you think that Vienna doesn't offer a great deal of variety, you've obviously not spent much time there. From Hapsburg style palaces to ultramodern facilities and buildings like the Millenium Tower and the UNO complex and that whole area, the city is quite diverse, and has always been a melting pot as the capital of the Holy Roman Empire. Paris is pretty diverse as well, and I think it's a bit amusing for someone from the UK criticizing french food, but that's just me.
post #50 of 247
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If you think that Vienna doesn't offer a great deal of variety, you've obviously not spent much time there.  From Hapsburg style palaces to ultramodern facilities and buildings like the Millenium Tower and the UNO complex and that whole area, the city is quite diverse, and has always been a melting pot as the capital of the Holy Roman Empire.   Paris is pretty diverse as well, and I think it's a bit amusing for someone from the UK criticizing french food, but that's just me.
My experince in Vienna has always been merely a couple of days prior to continuing to Salzburg and the Alps or Prague. So perhaps you are right. Vienna is a beautiful city, but from what I have seen it is all very baroque, from Kohlmarkt, to the Kartner Ring and even the finest hotels (Sacher and Intercontintal). Crticising French food? Where? I said the food is impecable, but sometimes at the more touristy places, where they can see we are English, try and take the piss by giving me a burnt steak, when asked for medium-rare and other such antics. How can you say those cities are diverse in contrast to say London, Manhattan, Bangkok, or Dubai. Take for example London, say you begin your day waking up in the Dorchester, in a traditionaly English furnished room, and you have an English cooked breakfast in the same hotel, then you shop in Harrods for traditional tailored attire, with a quick oysters and champagne in Harrods, continue on to Bond Street and Mayfair, where you take part in some more fashionable Italian style shopping, after this you visit the Saatchi gallery, and then the National Portrait, once again huge contrasts, after this you go to Edgware Road, where you have a Shwarma, some fresh juice and Balklava, then you go to Oxford Street and Regents Street for some Birtish style shopping, then you have high tea at the Ritz in a more renassance style atmosphere, you then go on to the Sanderson Bar for apiterifs, for some modern British style, and then on to dinner at Roka for some Japenese, then you make the decision for choosing to go Oriental, Retro, or Ultra-Fashionable, at either Opium, Attica, or Sketch respectivly,before returning to you you hotel to sleep.
post #51 of 247
Thread Starter 
London is certainly a diverse city, but I think all of the major imperial capitals are quite diverse. Certainly some of Vienna is baroque, but if you have spent most of your time inside the ring, that's what you're going to see... try going to the outer districts. I lived in the 19th when I was there, and there are some amazing things from Grinzing, which is similar to a little Austrian village, to the Karl Marx Hof, which was built by socialist central planners in the 1930s as a communal apartment complex, since renovated into modern luxury apartments. I didn't think Bangkok was too diverse, although it was certainly a very interesting city, Chiang Mai may be more interesting yet, and certainly Singapore and KL are more so IMO (even if they aren't as fun)
post #52 of 247
drrzt, I actually like the bridge in Brataslava (go figure taste), and I found that the castle was cooler than in Prague (from the outside as least). the castle in brataslava really looks like what it was - a fort used to hold down the people. the castle in prague is too baroque for me. that said, prague is definatly the more beutiful place, jsut very touristy.
post #53 of 247
I can't believe I have left our New Orleans - great food, some very good live music (restoration hall and snug harbor) huge amounts of mediocre music, but you can hear 10 lives sets a day, if you want. Amsterdam used to ba favorite, but I was there earlier this year and I jsut felt old. I prebrably spent 10 weekends a year there for most of my twenties and had a blast, now nothing seems that atractive to me, the city hasn't changed, there is just so much that a (faithful) married, middle aged father who needs to wake up with a clear head can do in Amsterdam.
post #54 of 247
Thread Starter 
Just so you guys know what we're talking about, this is Bratislava. The aboveformentioned bridge:
post #55 of 247
Quote:
London is certainly a diverse city, but I think all of the major imperial capitals are quite diverse.  Certainly some of Vienna is baroque, but if you have spent most of your time inside the ring, that's what you're going to see... try going to the outer districts.  I lived in the 19th when I was there, and there are some amazing things from Grinzing, which is similar to a little Austrian village, to the Karl Marx Hof, which was built by socialist central planners in the 1930s as a communal apartment complex, since renovated into modern luxury apartments. I didn't think Bangkok was too diverse, although it was certainly a very interesting city, Chiang Mai may be more interesting yet, and certainly Singapore and KL are more so IMO (even if they aren't as fun)
Yes, I have only been inside the ring (and more so toward the south and central part) realy, so I think that would explain it. I think, in respect to your Bangkok comment, it comes down to what you see as diverse, if we say diverse in the sense that I described London, and you Vienna, sure it is certainly not diverse at all, its 85% Thai, 5% Chinese, 5% Western, and 5% Indian, Burmese, Lao, Vietnamese etc. I'm sure interesting is a better word to describe Bangkok.
post #56 of 247
Thread Starter 
I don't think it's diverse compared to Singapore which is a mix of Indian, Malay, and Chinese... BTW Thailand has a higher percentage of Chinese, probably 20% or so, and they hold a big amount of the money in that country.
post #57 of 247
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I don't think it's diverse compared to Singapore which is a mix of Indian, Malay, and Chinese... BTW Thailand has a higher percentage of Chinese, probably 20% or so, and they hold a big amount of the money in that country.
Yes, Singapore is a lot more diverse than Bangkok. I am still surprised to hear that you think Paris is diverse though.
post #58 of 247
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then you have high tea at the Ritz in a more renassance style atmosphere,
Surely you mean afternoon tea. High tea was more like a supper -- a substantial evening meal usually involving meat, generally (forgive my saying it) applied to the evening meal of the lower orders. It's a common misnomer to call "afternoon tea" "high tea."
post #59 of 247
Thread Starter 
Paris has a large amount of Algerian, Turkish, and other North African people, as much as the French would like to hide that particular fact.
post #60 of 247
1. London 2. Rome 3. NYC 4. Naples 5. Venice 6. Chicago 7. Amsterdam I'm surprised more people haven't mentioned Naples - beautiful setting, interesting people, amazing food, great museums, great shopping, etc.
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