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Putting together my bar...(long) - Page 2

post #16 of 48
What an informative thread. I'm actually working on stocking a (much humbler) bar myself. My only suggestion would be some fruity liqueurs such as Cointreau (which others have already mentioned) as well as creme de cassis (DeKuyper and Mathilde are the only brands of which I can find around here).
post #17 of 48
Quote:
I'm in the process of putting together a bar in my house, planning to have four beers on tap and a well-stocked assortment of wines and spirits.  However, my tastes run to Vodkas and Scotches, and almost exclusively red wine.  I could use some assistance in choices for other spirits/wines.  Here's what I have in mind... Whisky: "Well" Jack Daniels, Macallan, Glenlivet, Jim Beam, Bushmills, Johnny Black, Abelour, Southern Comfort "Top Shelf" Highland Park, Dalwhinnie, Johnny Blue, Johnny Gold, Compass Box Hedonism What else should I stock for spirits?
Might I suggest one thing not covered in the list, Middleton Very Rare, it is signed sealed and dated by year and is considered to be the very best in Irish Whiskey, somewhat attainable in the states, but best to go to Cork and visit the factory to get the bottle, a true gem of an experience, wish there were a way for me to mail a sample to you.
post #18 of 48
Cask conditioned ale is simply amazing.  Simply ridiculous how the beer changes while it is in the cask.  In the states, the equivalent to CAMRA is www.nerax.org.  Alot of the craft brewerys here really love to participate and always send some of their best offerings (Smuttynose IPA, Victory Storm King Stout). I had the pleasure of going this past year and the Orkney Dragonhead Stout was the best.  It's amazing how they transport cask conditioned beer from the source for this event. Sad thing is,  some beers make it, while some don't.
post #19 of 48
Thread Starter 
I've always had more satifying results with keg beers, as for the most part they seem to have lesser impurities (at the top of the keg) than do bottles... I will have a large walk-in refrigerator area that will accomodate the kegs, as well as one for my wine as well.
post #20 of 48
Quote:
I've always had more satifying results with keg beers, as for the most part they seem to have lesser impurities (at the top of the keg) than do bottles... I will have a large walk-in refrigerator area that will accomodate the kegs, as well as one for my wine as well.
Buying keg beer because it's easier to look after than the real thing is rather like buying a polyester shirt because it's easier to iron than a cotton one. It goes without saying, of course, that English beers should be kept cool, but never refrigerated. Whilst on exercise in North Carolina, we quickly tired of the hideous chemical stuff the USMC were providing, which appeared to consist mostly of diuretics, so flew in bitter and Guiness in barrels (as we had the C130s). When we had some Marine guests, they were very suspicious of our un-refrigerated beer at first, but it didn't stop them drinking it. Judging by the suffering witnessed the next day, our beer was stronger than theirs, too.
post #21 of 48
I agree with Chris on the Middleton, it is a very good whisky. With that and a top shelf Bourbon, you'll be expanding beyond Scotch for the higher end and could surprise some of your guests. Nice collection of vintage Champagne. For the wines, well, I have to ask - what are you using them for? Drinking, right, but with food or just to sip? Light appetizers or more substantial food? I assume if this is for a bar you might be looking for wines that can stand by themselves. And of course early consumption or do you want to age a bit, as you have your Champagne? "Stocking a bar" can easily morph into "building a cellar...". Some of my favorites: Chardonnay: sorry, I am not a fan of most CA chardonnays. Too oaky, and while the tropical fruit you typically get from them isn't horrible, it isn't to my liking. From France for relatively easy sipping, a Macon Village or St. Veran would work, Chablis for a drier, flintier style (I really enjoy wines from Michele Barat, had a '95 the other day that was incredible). If you want some additional complexity, look for old vines - "ville vigne" on the label. From here you can go into other white Burgundies, but this can get crazy and expensive. OK, for CA chardonnay I will occasionally have some from Carneros or Russian River, like Acacia, or maybe a Calera (central coast?) which tends to be more Burgundian in style. Zins: I like a lot of Amador county Zins, especially Karly's Warrior Fires or Sadie Upton. Their everyday Zin, whose name I forget but it might just say Karly Amador on the label is a good value. Story's wines are good too; again, they make from several vineyards so it might be good to determine what style you want. I bought some futures from them - Picnic Hill - and it is quite a bit lighter than I recall it being from the barrel sample. (OK, it might have something to do with it being maybe 20th wine I tasted that afternoon)...the only Amador Zin I didn't like is from Montevina. Paso Robles is another good area for Zin producers. Frankly you can't go wrong with choosing an "R" for Zins: Ridge, Ravenswood (especially Dickerson, though Old Hill and Beloni are also very good) and Rosenblum. A word of caution on Rosenblum: they make wines from many, many, individual vineyards...the owners of those vineyards are typically so small they don't make their own wine. My current favorites there are Hendry and Allegria. For fun, you could put in a few Primitivo from Italy's Puglia region; Primitivo has been proven to be genetically identical to Zin. I haven't found a Primitivo yet that I like more than any of the Zins I mentioned, but YMMV. So this post ends on less than a page, I'll write about Merlot and Pinot separately. But two other thoughts: -not sure how close you are to Santa Ana. The Wine Club has one of its three locations there; you might want to look at their catalog/website or visit. Knowledgeable people, great prices, and if you go, you can taste about 30-40 wines on the honor system (assuming it's like their store in San Jose and San Francisco). -re: current vs older vintages...consider looking at wine auctions, say, via Christies. Often the non-trophy wines are overlooked, and you can get some good values on properly stored, ready to drink wines.
post #22 of 48
Thread Starter 
I am really close to Santa Ana, it's just the next city over, I will have to check it out...
post #23 of 48
Apologies, didn't include this link to The Wine Club in yesterday's lengthy post.
post #24 of 48
drizzt, I think you should host the first annual "Style Forum" get together at your house once you get your bar stocked.
post #25 of 48
Quote:
drizzt, I think you should host the first annual "Style Forum" get together at your house once you get your bar stocked.  
I agree, sounds like it will be a better bar than the Buddah Bar
post #26 of 48
Thread Starter 
That's not a bad idea once I get cracking on this thing, I need to actually put in the physical bar yet though (altyhough I have much of the liquor)
post #27 of 48
I think from all the great selections you've been given you will have all the freinds you haven't seen in years on your door step when the word spreads. What I think is missing from the lineup is some good cosmic potions such as Grappa, Aguadente, Lemoncello(kept in the freezer),Green Chartrusse. Be careful with these, they tend to creep up on you.
post #28 of 48
Also meant to mention Hendricks Gin w/ a slice of cucumber over ice. Yum.
post #29 of 48
Thread Starter 
I have some Amaro also, and will be getting some other interesting wines. No sake suggestions?
post #30 of 48
I definately must suggest Rock Hill Farms Bourbon. Here is a link to a bourbon site describing it. Hope you try it and enjoy it. http://www.greatbourbon.com/rockhill.html Craig
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