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Glenplaid suit

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
The five suits that I wear regularly to work are all either navy or dark gray.  I was thinking of adding a black and white glenplaid as my next suit.  How versatile is this color/pattern, and would it be a good choice for suit #6?
post #2 of 17
I've got just such a suit and it's a staple of my wardrobe. I like to wear it with a blue dress shirt and red or burgundy ties. That said, part of the answer depends on your work situation. In some (more formal) environments, a glen plaid suit may be seen as too "dandy"-ish.
post #3 of 17
I love glen plaids in general, and black/white glen plaid is my favorite version. I have a 3 piece tan/brown 3-piece glen plaid, and a black/white, with a faint red line 2 piece flannel. I get lots of compliments on them. You are right though about the versatility. You cant wear them as often as say a navy or gray suit, it will just look repetitive, if that makes sense. But if you already own 5 suits, you will be fine. The nice thing about glen plaid is you can wear the jacket of the suit as a sportcoat with flannels or jeans too.
post #4 of 17
I agree, a black and white Glen Plaid is a terrific look but could be too severe for some industries. My suggestion would be to find a more earth toned Glen Plaid with a subtle window pane. This suit is very acceptable whenever and wherever you go. And don't forget to acquire a chocolate brown suede shoe for the finishing touch. I like to use all types of shirtings and neckwear with this suit and for dressing it down, try a fine cashmere turtleneck or polo.
post #5 of 17
Would someone please post examples?  Thanks.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
I agree, a black and white Glen Plaid is a terrific look but could be too severe for some industries. My suggestion would be to find a more earth toned Glen Plaid with a subtle window pane. This suit is very acceptable whenever and wherever you go. And don't forget to acquire a chocolate brown suede shoe for the finishing touch.
I agree that this would work, not on, say, a court date, but maybe a more casual look for Friday or hump day. The black and white color combinatuon could look nice, done right, but IMO, would be neither here nor there for your work (you're a lawyer, right?) Seems too casual, and perhaps even offuppingly dandyish on a court date, and not casual enough for casual days.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:
I agree, a black and white Glen Plaid is a terrific look but could be too severe for some industries. My suggestion would be to find a more earth toned Glen Plaid with a subtle window pane. This suit is very acceptable whenever and wherever you go. And don't forget to acquire a chocolate brown suede shoe for the finishing touch.  
I agree that this would work, not on, say, a court date, but maybe a more casual look for Friday or hump day.  The black and white color combinatuon could look nice, done right, but IMO, would be neither here nor there for your work (you're a lawyer, right?)  Seems too casual, and perhaps even offuppingly dandyish on a court date, and not casual enough for casual days.
I wrote in another thread that a dark suit is most appropriate for a big-firm lawyer who needs to project authority to his clients.  As I am now a civil servant (government lawyer), I feel that I have more flexibility in my wardrobe.  Actually, a bigger concern would be how a glenplaid suit goes with an Asian complexion.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Actually, a bigger concern would be how a glenplaid suit goes with an Asian complexion.
In general, not great. However, as someone has pointed out before, there is considerable variations in Asian complexions. The general wisdom, and I believe it to be true, is that Asian complexions look best with high constrast clothing. A black and white glenplaid will (generally) not provide that. On the other hand, a glenplaid in a dark brown (chestnut) base with complementary colors, may be quite the thing. Especially good for fall.
post #9 of 17
LA Guy, Im not sure I agree with you - wouldnt a black/white glenplaid be the MOST high constrast of the glenplaid family? In my mind a dark brown/chestnut plaid is much more muted, the exact opposite of high contrast. Maybe I am misunderstanding?
post #10 of 17
I believe he means contrast vs. wearer, not the internal contrast of the cloth. I like the look of black and white glen plaid, but it looks terrible on me. I agree with (and fit within) the general rule that asian skin tones do not take well to lower contrast clothing. I have a blue glen plaid suit that I like a lot, and like the idea of one in the darker brown family. But black and white ain't gonna happen.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
I believe he means contrast vs. wearer, not the internal contrast of the cloth.
Thanks. In fact, the high contrast in the cloth leads to *less* contrast vs. the wearer.
post #12 of 17
ah, that makes sense, thanks for the clarification
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
I've tried on black and white glenplaid before, and I wasn't quite sure I could pull it off.  This thread has convinced me to look elsewhere for alternatives to navy and dark gray.
post #14 of 17
I don't know about the coloring question, but a glen plaid should be perfectly acceptable for your intended use. I've seen lawyers, government and otherwise, wearing all kinds of stuff, and glen plaid would be an improvement on almost all of it.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Would someone please post examples?  Thanks.
Gladly, see the following example of a glen plaid jacket: Couldn't resist...
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