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Unusual clothing features

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
When looking at fashion plates, pictures of style icons and reading about menswear, one comes across many unusual clothing features.  Sometimes one might wish to give them a try.  For example, here is a pair of suit pants with an high vee back. A little eccentric.  Don't think I'll do it again.  But, notice also, no hip pockets.  Got that one from Clark Gable and it has become a standard detail for me.   I wonder if others share my enthusiasm for this kind of thing.  Anyone for suspender buttons on the outside of the waistband?
post #2 of 31
I don't know man, that look just screams "WEDGIE" to me. Maybe it's just that the way the suspenders are shaped draws the eyes that way.
post #3 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I don't know man, that look just screams "WEDGIE" to me.
Here's another.  Don't know if you can see that the lining across the back of the shoulders is comprised of overlapping "petals."  I'm told this is called buggy lining.  Intended to, and does, keep cool in tropical weather.
post #4 of 31
Quote:
Here's another.  Don't know if you can see that the lining across the back of the shoulders is comprised of overlapping "petals."  I'm told this is called buggy lining.  Intended to, and does, keep cool in tropical weather.
I have the same design on an unlined Donna Karen blazer. The jacket is a heavier weight Wool/Angora/Spandex (yeah, I don't know about that combination either) and has silk "petals." Due to the outer material the petals occasionally bunch up and I usually have to smooth out the material after I put on the jacket. I can see how they would work well on a linen or lighter weight jacket though. Another detail to add to the list is secret pockets. I have a pair of trousers with a pocket sewn into the waist on my backside. It's only 2-21/2" big, haven't really found a use for it yet... Aaron P.S>The suspender number up top looks painful...
post #5 of 31
It was said that Brummel's clothing blended together and I strive for that look. Similar to you, I combine conservative colors in quality fabrics with unusual details. For example, I'll wear shirts with Eton or tab collars. My vests are generally lapelled and sometimes double breasted, and I'll often wear an odd vest with a suit, such as a cream vest with a blue two button. My trousers lack rear pockets and have English backs. Etc. Will
post #6 of 31
I think the first picture just looks like the seat is too tight, or the shirt too loose, thus scrunching up under the thin fabric, or both. Also, without the extra fabric of the rear pockets to add some body back there, any extra shirt is that much more obvious.
post #7 of 31
Quote:
... P.S>The suspender number up top looks painful...
Painful and wedgies... Do not forget that on a pant like that the body of the pant is much taller than the pant most of us wear which ends at our waist. This pant rides much higher, I would say that this intentionaly ends up close to the belly button, so yes, if anyone of our conventional pants were to magically (painfully) end up there, we would be the victim of a rather uncomfortable wedgie, however as those pants are higher up nothing has been pulled up to gain that look. Mistahlee, correct me if I am wrong there. JJF
post #8 of 31
That looks like a pretty typical high-backed English trouser to me. I have several suits with trousers like this, all 3-piece. They look great under vests. If the rise is cut correctly, they are quite comfortable. I have never had any reason to complain about them.
post #9 of 31
Quote:
That looks like a pretty typical high-backed English trouser to me...
Which is what I was trying to say... JJF
post #10 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
That looks like a pretty typical high-backed English trouser to me.  I have several suits with trousers like this, all 3-piece.  They look great under vests.  If the rise is cut correctly, they are quite comfortable.  I have never had any reason to complain about them.
High-backed English trouser, is it?  Do they have a military heritage? Cavalry uniform?   Graceful side profile.  Chicks dig 'em.
post #11 of 31
Quote:
High-backed English trouser, is it?  Do they have a military heritage? Cavalry uniform?
I believe the style is derived from riding breeches.
post #12 of 31
Quote:
When looking at fashion plates, pictures of style icons and reading about menswear, one comes across many unusual clothing features.  Sometimes one might wish to give them a try.  For example, here is a pair of suit pants with an high vee back. A little eccentric.  Don't think I'll do it again.  But, notice also, no hip pockets.  Got that one from Clark Gable and it has become a standard detail for me.   I wonder if others share my enthusiasm for this kind of thing.  Anyone for suspender buttons on the outside of the waistband?
All the trouser I have are like this, except that I have pockets on the back; and a small strap made with the same fabric of the trousers. This is the right cut to use with braces.
post #13 of 31
Love the English back trousers. I applaud the lack of back pockets. It gives a smoother line. I have one back pocket on the right for the hankerchief. I need it because I carry money, change, keys, and sometimes a cell phone in the front pockets. I skip the left, back pocket. Who did the fine work on the trousers and your sportscoat?
post #14 of 31
"1, 2, 3, look at mistahlee........" I dig your brace-back trousers.  Part of a suit you commissioned, or second-hand?  I have a couple of second-hand suits (one by Wells, according to the label - and it's made of very heavy worsted) which have the English-style brace back, and no rear pockets.  I don't think either trousers' back is cut as high as those, though. Both have the brace buttons on the exterior waistband, and those buttons are very high and curved, if that makes sense - not the basic flat button one sees used on most trousers these days). I second Manton - such pants work beautifully with a vested suit. I've seen lots of old military uniforms with this style of trouser, so perhaps it is of military origin; of course, with the cavalry at one time being of such importance in military circles, perhaps the origin is one and the same as the equestrian breech.
post #15 of 31
All dress trousers should be made this way.Pants should hang from the shoulder not the waist.Bravo. Bravissimo mistahlee . I am on my way to have some more trousers made in just the same way. Eccentric? Who cares?
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