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post #31 of 45
My favorite vodka is Russky Standart. Hands down the best Vodka i have tried. It was recommended to me by all my Russian friends. It's all they ever drink
post #32 of 45
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I think you'll really like Charodei, it is smooth yet flavorful, could be my favorite vodka ever, although Red Army has such a nice punch to it.
Great Vodka my wife says, she like Charodei, as well as Kutskova, Sobieski, Chopin, The Jewel of Russia, Belvedere, Stoli, just about any expensive fruit but try Youri Dolgoruki, she claims it is the best, personally I would rather wrap my indulgences in a rare Irish Whiskey called Middleton Very Rare, if one has not tried this, get a bottle if you can find it, to die for. We must start a review on Whiskeys.
post #33 of 45
Thread Starter 
Too bad Russky Standart is almost impossible to get in the US... globetrotter, forgot to mention that one, bring some back.
post #34 of 45
I'll keep my eyes open for it.
post #35 of 45
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Too bad Russky Standart is almost impossible to get in the US... globetrotter, forgot to mention that one, bring some back.
I've seen it for sale in the US. But yes, almost impossible to find here. I'd be interested to know who has found it in the US, and in what State of the Union, and for what price. Thanks. H
post #36 of 45
interesting article in the times: T was not exactly a victory for the underdog, but chalk it up as a triumph of the unexpected. The idea for the Dining section's tasting panel was to sample a range of the new high-end unflavored vodkas that have come on the market in the last few years in their beautifully designed bottles and to compare them with a selection of established super-premium brands. To broaden the comparison, or possibly as a bit of mischief, our tasting coordinator, Bernard Kirsch, added to our blind tasting a bottle of Smirnoff, the single best-selling unflavored vodka in the United States, but a definite step down in status, marketing and bottle design. Advertisement After the 21 vodkas were sipped and the results compiled, the Smirnoff was our hands-down favorite. Shocking? Perhaps. Delving into the world of vodka reveals a spirit unlike almost any other, with standards that make judging it substantially different from evaluating wine, beer, whiskey or even root beer. A malt whiskey should be distinctive, singular. The same goes for a Burgundy or a Belgian ale. But vodka? Vodka is measured by its purity, by an almost Platonic neutrality that makes tasting it more akin to tasting bottled waters, or snowflakes. Yet in just a few decades vodka has become the most popular spirit in the country. It is now the default liquor in cocktails once made with gin, and with its glossy merchandising it has set a marketing standard for high-end spirits that the other liquors are all struggling to emulate. It's quite an achievement for something that the government defines as "neutral spirits, so distilled, or so treated after distillation with charcoal or other materials, as to be without distinctive character, aroma, taste or color." A lack of distinctiveness is a separate matter from a lack of distinction. The vodkas we tasted had character and their own flavors and aromas, even though the differences among them were often subtle and difficult to articulate. "I'm looking for interest," said Eben Klemm, a cocktail expert who joined me for the tasting, along with my colleagues Florence Fabricant and William L. Hamilton, who writes the Shaken and Stirred column for the Sunday Styles section. "Some were so unique that they stood out," he added, "while others were pure, simple and austere." Mr. Klemm, whose heady title is director of cocktail development for B. R. Guest, a restaurant group that includes Dos Caminos, Fiamma and Vento in New York, found himself torn in two directions in assessing the vodkas. Because we tasted them straight, he judged them as solo beverages yet could not help extrapolating how they would taste in cocktails, which are overwhelmingly the vehicle for consuming vodka. Mr. Hamilton, too, wondered whether his perceptions might change. "When deployed in mixed drinks, these slight flavor profiles that I enjoyed might cause trouble," he said. Ms. Fabricant, on the other hand, dismissed such existential issues. "Go with the flow," she suggested, adding that the qualities she sought in the vodkas included elegance, neutrality and balance. "As a vodka drinker who likes vodka on the rocks, I picked out what I would want to drink," she said. I'm not much of a vodka drinker myself, although I do like a good bloody mary. I prefer gin in classic gin drinks like martinis and gimlets that have largely evolved into vodka cocktails. But I appreciate the purity and depth of a fine vodka. Those I liked best were all smooth rather than harsh, and balanced and harmonious rather than burdened by alcoholic heat. They had a presence in the mouth that we sometimes referred to as texture or substance. That being said, at the end of our tasting it was Smirnoff at the top of our list, ahead of many other names that are no doubt of higher status in stylish bars and lounges. Some of those names did not even make our Top 10. Grey Goose from France, one of the most popular vodkas, was felt to lack balance and seemed to have more than a touch of sweetness. Ketel One from the Netherlands, another top name, was felt to be routine and sharp, although Mr. Klemm did describe it as "a good mixer."
post #37 of 45
The rest of Globetrotter's article can be found here: http://www.nytimes.com/2005....sition=
post #38 of 45
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The rest of Globetrotter's article can be found here: http://www.nytimes.com/2005....sition=
That's pretty much what a Russian friend of mine says. He always has Smirnoff in his freezer. He frowns when anybody mentions flavored vodkas. I still remember when he initiated me to vodka drinking. Here I am, trying to taste it as though it were wine. He ordered: drink it all at once, then eat a pickle. I'm back to my Gevrey Chambertin.
post #39 of 45
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(chorse123 @ Jan. 27 2005,11:19) The rest of Globetrotter's article can be found here: http://www.nytimes.com/2005....sition=
That's pretty much what a Russian friend of mine says.  He always has Smirnoff in his freezer.  He frowns when anybody mentions flavored vodkas.  I still remember when he initiated me to vodka drinking.  Here I am, trying to taste it as though it were wine.  He ordered: drink it all at once, then eat a pickle.   I'm back to my Gevrey Chambertin.
same thing, except instead of the pickle was some sausage. I keep a bottle of 5 dollar polish vodka in my freezer that has a great oily texture when cold.
post #40 of 45
I "learnt" the tasting thing from my dad. When I was a kid, he loved getting out the warm bottles of Polish vodka from our trip there to impress guests by the potency. He would sip his one shot glass for the whole time the aperitif lasted. He has no excuse. Both his parents were Polish .
post #41 of 45
Odd that your Russian friend would turn up his nose at flavoured Vodkas, Fabienne. They are very traditional in Russia and are paired to specific foods with fanatical devotion.
post #42 of 45
I have seen that, too, with old school russians and poles. the yuppies are something different.
post #43 of 45
Well, he is known for being quite contradictory.  I don't know, I've only been to Poland, and there, I only saw unflavored vodkas.  Lost of it.  In French, we say: "Saoul comme un Polonais". (As drunk as a Pole). This one time, we were traveling at night by car and they hadn't finished the road, so the one half going the other way was 4cm lower.  A guy on a bike in front of us, obviously very, very drunk, swerved so much he hit the other side and fell off his bike.  My dad stopped and asked him if he was OK.  My mom said something in French, and he started singing "Aux Champs Elysees" at the top of his voice.  My grandma in the back of the car got scared.  I thought it was quite exciting.  I had never seen anybody drunk.
post #44 of 45
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I have seen that, too, with old school russians and poles. the yuppies are something different.
I spent most of my time in Poland in the countryside, small villages, staying with family.
post #45 of 45
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I have seen that, too, with old school russians and poles. the yuppies are something different.
I have seen that old school russians and poles drink unflavored, not flavored vodkas. younger people and yuppies go for the flavored stuff.
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