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post #31 of 66
I'm a Nikon D70 owner. I've always used the Nikon system so i was able to use one of my AF lenses when i got the D70. I absolutely love it and as much as i enjoy shooting film, i really don't think i'll be going back, with the exception of my old Rollie 2 1/4. As mentioned by someone else. DPreview is fantastic and many people post pictures of samples and links to helpful resources. I'd also try Ebay for monopods and other equipment. Best, Stevo
post #32 of 66
I'm a professional photojournalist at a daily newspaper, and I just found this thread so I thought I would chime in.  As for the monopods, they are good, and almost a necessity when shooting sports with long lenses or when you don't feel like holding the camera all the time.  Plus, it gives you one level plane to balance the camera on which can help with composition and focusing.  But keep in mind, and I speak from personal experience here, when you buy a monopod, make it one with the twist type of adjustments, not the ones with the rotating cips or the ones that snap into place or similar designs. Those lose their hold after a while and become useless. I have a lot of experience with the digital SLR's (Nikon, mainly) as that is what I have been using for the past couple of years.  If you have any questions along that realm, I would love to offer any help I can. Kevin
post #33 of 66
I use a Nikon D100, with which I am inordinately happy. It's such a flexible system (I previously used a Bronica and 2 Pentax SLRs), and the performance is outstanding. I'd be interested to hear what flash set-ups others are using - I haven't splashed out on a Nikon flash yet, and I need to be convinced taht it will make a significant difference to a non-Nikon one.
post #34 of 66
The pictures of the Grenson shoes on our site were done with a Sony Mavica 5.o, I also use a Cannon EOS Rebel Digital that I just purchased, mainly because I have so many Cannon EF lenses that will now fit a camera I can afford that is SLR Digital. It is a good 6.3 megapixel, not as high as say the Nikon, but great for an amateur wannabe. The digital age is here, and it is nice, the best thing about the Sony is the disc formatted memory, no need to worry about running out of space, in the lowest mode, you can hold up to 1000 pictures, then flop in another disc and go some more.
post #35 of 66
I've been very happy with the SB-600 (Nikon). Got one new on ebay for $216 to my door. Its really dedicated to the D70 system. I didn't see the benefits of spending 100+ more for the SB-800 and don't think i'd ever use the extra features. And you can use the 600 off the camera and use the built in as the commander. stevo
post #36 of 66
Quote:
I use a Nikon D100, with which I am inordinately happy. It's such a flexible system (I previously used a Bronica and 2 Pentax SLRs), and the performance is outstanding.   I'd be interested to hear what flash set-ups others are using - I haven't splashed out on a Nikon flash yet, and I need to be convinced taht it will make a significant difference to a non-Nikon one.
There are many who think that the Nikon flash metering system is the best around, especially for fill flash in daylight. It accounts for the focus distance in calculating the flash output (IIRC, Canon's current system does not do that, but Minolta Maxxum and post MZ-S model Pentax cameras do), and is excellent at getting balance right when doing daylight fill. Most of the major SLR systems now use a pre-flash to help calculate the output for the actual exposure, and if you use a generic flash you won't be able to take advantage of that. In my experience, preflash TTL (through the lens) metering is more accurate than non-preflash TTL or the non-TTL metering systems, and systems that account for subject distance may provide an advantage as well. If you don't use a Nikon flash, or one of the third party flash units that is built for use with the newest Nikon bodies, you won't be able to take advantage of the flash metering system in the D100. IMHO, that's missing out on one of the best features of Nikon's camera line. Going with a Nikon system flash will at a minimum allow you to take advantage of the metering of your camera, and if you go with the full bells'n'whistles flash models, you can go to wireless off-camera flash which is really cool sometimes (but which very few people ever do or have a need for). And this comes from a person who owns not a single Nikon product. (Pentax SLR gear, Cosina/Voigtlander rangefinder, and Panasonic and Sony digicams).
post #37 of 66
Does anyone use flash bulbs?
post #38 of 66
Quote:
Does anyone use flash bulbs?
In the comic books....
post #39 of 66
Thread Starter 
I should be getting the camera on Friday... I'll let you all know how it works out.
post #40 of 66
Thread Starter 
UPDATE: Just in case anyone was wondering, I'm very happy with the camera. I feel like I did enough research on it to not be suprised by its few minor shortcomings. I also picked up a memory card. My camera uses SecureDigital (SD) memory, and I wanted to get something I'd probably never have to change, so I went with a San Disk 1GB Ultra II card. I decided to go with the Ultra II for the fast write speed, which helps in high speed consecutive shot mode, and it appears to be working quite well. See Cowboys v.s. Seahawks thread for some samples of unedited pictures.
post #41 of 66
The Sandisk Ultra II cards are probably the best cards on the market right now. Good choice. Curious how much you ended up paying for the 1g card. Prices have been coming down a lot on the smaller size cards. stevo
post #42 of 66
I have a 512MB Sandisk Ultra II that I paid $60 for after MIR.
post #43 of 66
Thread Starter 
the 1GB SanDisk Ultra II was $89 after MIR
post #44 of 66
I'm stuck between 3 cameras and trying to figure out what to buy.  I take a lot of outdoor and indoor (long exposure) shots.  My 3 choices: 1) Panasonic DMC LC1/Leica Lumix 2 Pros: build quality, excellent Leica Summicron lens, ease of use, viewfinder, larger CCD 2/3. bounce flash setting. Cons: Price, size, slowest shutter speed of 8 secs., highest ISO equivalent is 400 2) Nikon Coolpix 8400 Pros: Wide angle 24mm equiv., swingout LCD, larger CCD 2/3 Cons: reviews not out yet - I will be buying soon, Ugly as sin 3) Sony DSC V3 Pros: Price, long shutter speed of 30 secs, ISO equiv up to 800, nicer looking than the Nikon, unlimited VGA movie mode. Cons: problems with apeture settings on auto/program auto, jog dial easy to knock and change settings, 35mm equiv. wide angle, no thread to attach a circular polarizer. Any thoughts? btw. I don't want an DSLR.
post #45 of 66
Why not DSLR, cost?
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