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How to dress in good Italian restaurants (NY) - Page 4

post #46 of 67
Thanks.

Forgot to mention there is Barbone. Great patio for when the weather warms up and very good food.
post #47 of 67
"anyone can recommend restaurants with good Italian food in NY? I am not talking pizza&pasta, but tripe, brains,oxtail, pig foot and sweatbread dishes"
Babbo's. Tough reservation bot worth the work. Sportsjacket and decent slacks. Don't wear orange Crocs.
post #48 of 67
I ended up in Nolita last night at a place called Bread. Quasi-Italian and passable food, but jammed with table after table of young, beautiful women. The ratio of women to men was easily 4:1. I had to ask if there was an event, but no just another Thursday night.

Not sure if that helps the OP.

Put me down as another who likes Da Andrea as a local place. Also Da Umberto on W17th.

lefty
post #49 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by letmebefell View Post
I thought Babbo was stuffy, and probably over-priced. The food was good, though.

Huh? Babbo is the least stuffy upscale Manhattan restaurant I've been to, and I've been to a few. Blaring rock music, fairly casual dress, and great food with lots of offal and the prices were reasonable for NYC.
post #50 of 67
San Pietro on 54th and Madison is my favourite. sanpietro.net
post #51 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
I ended up in Nolita last night at a place called Bread. Quasi-Italian and passable food, but jammed with table after table of young, beautiful women. The ratio of women to men was easily 4:1. I had to ask if there was an event, but no just another Thursday night.



lefty

Go down the street to Bar Marche for brunch. I love having tacos and french toast.
post #52 of 67
Lupa requires reservations made 30 days out. It is now on OpenTable. You can also walk in, with a wait of generally between 30 and 90 minutes.
post #53 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by juuceman View Post
Lupa requires reservations made 30 days out. It is now on OpenTable. You can also walk in, with a wait of generally between 30 and 90 minutes.

Do you mean you CAN make them 30 days in advance?
I wasn't under the impression that you HAD to.
post #54 of 67
what i call Italian is Italian American, what you call Italian is Italian from Italy. My family comes from Brooklyn, and Red Sauce, will always be Authentic Italian to me. This is my family's restaurant in NYC: http://www.frescobyscotto.com/
post #55 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal2NYC View Post
Do you mean you CAN make them 30 days in advance?
I wasn't under the impression that you HAD to.

The book opens 30 days out. If you'd like to eat dinner there at a time other than 5:30 or 6 PM, you need to make a reservation on the day that it opens up. While there are quirks and variations on this, consistently you're not going to be able to get in without being on the phone at 10 am 30 days out.

We've given up on making reservations there. They reserve roughly half of the restaurant for walk ins, and the bar is pretty comfortable and often there's not a huge wait.

Our current, and somewhat longstanding, rotation includes: Lavagna (slightly more mediteranean but excellent), Bar Pitti, the previoulsy mentioned Da Umberto (which is more southern Italian, old school NYC Italian), the place on 10th Street just east of University, Gradisca when we want fresh pasta, Otto for wine, cheese and meat, pasta and pizza or crostini of the day always finished with the in-house made gelato, a few outer borough pizza places, and some old world red sauce spots in the boroughs..
post #56 of 67
Lupa must have changed then. That was where they'd send you if you couldn't walk in to Babbo or Otto.
post #57 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post
what i call Italian is Italian American, what you call Italian is Italian from Italy.

My family comes from Brooklyn, and Red Sauce, will always be Authentic Italian to me.

This is my family's restaurant in NYC:

http://www.frescobyscotto.com/

That's odd, I've never thought of Fresco as a red sauce joint. They've always seemed to take more pride in the ingredients. Your Scopa outlet on 28th Street was great for this. Too bad it closed down.
post #58 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

This is my family's restaurant in NYC:

http://www.frescobyscotto.com/

Used to get that when I worked in Midtown.

Are you Anthony Jr. or John?
post #59 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal2NYC View Post
Lupa must have changed then. That was where they'd send you if you couldn't walk in to Babbo or Otto.

I've been eating at Lupa for seven or eight years now, and while the popularity has been steadily increasing, it's always been that way if you wanted a reservation, 30 days to the numerical date. The Open Table innovation is recent, and if anything has made it more annoying. Walking in is completely different, there's a much lesser chance that you'll be seated in the rear room which has white tablecloths and is where we need to sit with my girlfriend's mother. The front room varies, we've walked in on a Saturday at 9 and sat within 10 minutes and waited 90 on a Wednesday.

Babbo has been getting easier to walk in for the last year or so. I don't like it anywhere nearly as much as Lupa. Also enjoyed Del Posto when it first opened (the trattoria, not the main restaurant), but feel that it's fallen off significantly.

There are some better small west village places that are excellent, but they're dwarfed by the number of red sauce places that abound around Bleecker.

I've never been a huge fan of Frank, on 2nd Avenue. Lil Frankie's, is, dollar for dollar a much better option, in my opinion. The menu at Frank is dominated by Brooklyn based Southern Italian cooking.

If you want to make a trip for Italian, Queen, in Brooklyn Heights, is excellent. Lunch there can be a scene, with most of the lawyers from the courts headed there during lunch breaks. Dinner is an amazing cross section of Brooklyn society. The food is amazingly well sourced, well prepared, and the menu changes frequently based upon seasonal availability. They don't rape you on the specials, a la Mulino.

Most men will be extremely comfortable in dark jeans and a sport coat in 90% of the restaurants in NYC, especially in the spring. Very few, if any, restaurants below 14th Street require a jacket, I believe that Il Mulino will be the only place that one would feel uncomfortable in less than a suit. San Domenico would necessitate a suit, in my opinion. NY is an extremely casual city, in my opinion. While you can definitely dress better than this, no one will blink an eye if you choose not to. Babbo is one of the most casual NYC 3* restaurants.

If you're looking for innovative cooking, including tripe and variety meats, while Babbo and Del Posto will satisfy this craving, you're better off in another ethnic vicinity. Korean restaurants generally offer many variations on these dishes. Try Woo Chon, on 36th Street for traditional cooking. For some of the most innovative and seasonal cooking, eat at Momofuku Ssam Bar, Ko, or Momofuku Noodle Bar, in that order.
post #60 of 67
Went to-and enjoyed-Crispo's on west 14th a couple of weeks ago. They are known for their spaghetti carbonera and it was quite good. They have a large room in the back( i assume it is the airshaft) with a pond and a fireplace.

Also like Il Giglio in tribeca. Same owners as Il Mulino, but not nearly as expensive.
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