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Writing Instruments - Page 7

post #91 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post

Interesting question and good rec, T. Penmanship is a strange thing for me, and as I was thinking about this post, I realized why. For starters, obviously for grading, notes, and such, I use a pen, but for actual writing... ANY writing... I type. I can type much faster than I can hand write, and so when I try to write an actual document (even a brief letter), it feels very inefficient, slow, and annoying to me, as somebody who has to write a lot.
I realized that there is a brief few years of age that may be in the same boat as me, but not so many. Those born in the late 70's/early 80's, maybe. We were the first group to grow up with computers, and also had typing classes in middle school/high school. SO, we grew up "typing," but didn't have texting or cell phones until college or later. So, we never got out of the habit of, literally, typing everything.
Most of my same-age friends (28-35) from school are also very excellent typists... much faster than handwriting. Most are also very bad texters, and also have crappy penmanship. Younger college students and such are more "versatile" with technology... but most of them aren't particularly good typists.
Anyway, this has nothing to do with the thread, but just something your and Indesertum's posts got me thinking about.

I'm just a bit older, and have been in the writing habit forever. When I settle down and take my time my writing is pretty good although inconsistent. I think I took typing as an elective in 5th grade, took a computer science elective in 11th grade, and didn't get heavy computer usage until after graduation. I still jot down notes, post-its, write on invoices, packing slips, etc, and burn through legal pads about one every few weeks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

(...)
One small question about writing "with your shoulder"... do you literally just move your whole arm to form letters, that is don't really move the wrist/fingers at all? It works, but I write very big that way and it seems a little funny.

For me, it's a combination. The shoulder takes part of the stroke, and the wrist/fingers take the other part. You just don't want either area to take a large part of the stroke - it's kind of a gross-fine coordination.
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

my typing is loads faster, but i want prettier handwriting when i take notes so i can actually read my chickenscratch later. it's hard when the lecture is going quickly and you need to write a lot of information. and it's odd that a lot of my classes have a no screens policy. -_- old people. making life difficult for young people

Also in high school I took a Note-taking class. It wasn't quite Stenography but it did advocate abbreviations, and transcription shortly after the session. Still use it when things are moving quickly.
post #92 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post

1. Japanese pens: From left three are Pilot custom 74s, and the (red) on the right is a Platinum 3776.

If you're located in Japan, don't forget to check out Sailor. They offer perhaps the smoothest and finest nibs I've come across (on modern pens at least). They also offer some really interesting specialty nibs: http://www.nibs.com/SailorSpecialtyNibs.htm
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post

My next purchase would be either a Pilot Custom 742 or 743 (the next two levels up from the Custom 74). The former is about 20,000 yen and the latter 30,000 ($200-300USD).

Good choice. I have a Pilot Custom 742 FA that I could not be more happy with.
post #93 of 111
These days I've been using the Lamy 2000 rollerball with a Pilot G2 broad refill. Generally I never handwrite anything longer than a signature unless it's in Teeline.
post #94 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by KlezmerBlues View Post

If you're located in Japan, don't forget to check out Sailor. They offer perhaps the smoothest and finest nibs I've come across (on modern pens at least). They also offer some really interesting specialty nibs: http://www.nibs.com/SailorSpecialtyNibs.htm
Good choice. I have a Pilot Custom 742 FA that I could not be more happy with.

Thanks! Definitely sailor has been on my radar. Any recs for something comparable to a Custom 742, but from Sailor? I don't know their offerings as well as Pilot.
post #95 of 111
The Sailor 1911 Realo and 1911 Large is pretty similar in size to the Custom 742. Sailor 1911 M/Standard is comparable to Pilot 74. The Pilot pens are somewhat longer when posted. I think that the 1911 line is called Profit in Japan.

As I prefer piston fillers, I really like the Sailor 1911 Realo (at least since they changed the piston design). But as far as converters go, the con-70 in the Custom 742 is as good as it gets. It's easier to operate and holds more ink than Sailors standard converters. So it depends on which filling mechanism you prefer and how important it is for you.

If I were to choose between Sailor and Pilot, I would get another Realo if I needed a regular/non-flex nib. But Sailor has nothing that compares to the flex that the 742 falcon nib delivers. It is quite unique among modern pens.
post #96 of 111
So, my old Lamy M63 mine was empty and I replaced it with a new one. Now I often have breaks/gaps when writing, sometimes it just stops writing for 1 inch or so. Am I doing something wrong? I don't press very hard. But a rollerball shouldn't really need much pressure, right?
post #97 of 111
Rollerballs clog easily. Run it under hot water for some time. Then apply pressure on the tip against some paper and start writing.
post #98 of 111
Hm, thanks, but didn't help. It's mostly the strokes that go from right to left (if that makes any sense to you).
Edited by b1os - 9/19/12 at 9:59am
post #99 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by KlezmerBlues View Post

The Sailor 1911 Realo and 1911 Large is pretty similar in size to the Custom 742. Sailor 1911 M/Standard is comparable to Pilot 74. The Pilot pens are somewhat longer when posted. I think that the 1911 line is called Profit in Japan.
As I prefer piston fillers, I really like the Sailor 1911 Realo (at least since they changed the piston design). But as far as converters go, the con-70 in the Custom 742 is as good as it gets. It's easier to operate and holds more ink than Sailors standard converters. So it depends on which filling mechanism you prefer and how important it is for you.
If I were to choose between Sailor and Pilot, I would get another Realo if I needed a regular/non-flex nib. But Sailor has nothing that compares to the flex that the 742 falcon nib delivers. It is quite unique among modern pens.

THANKS for the info; this helps. There is a place near me that stocks both Pilot and Sailor, and once a month they run a 20% off sale... wink.gif
You know my next request... POST SOME PICS of your pens. Would like to see them.
post #100 of 111
Again I would recommend using a Pilot gel refill in Lamy and Rotring rollerballs. Better, lighter, cheaper.
post #101 of 111
The thing is I still have 8 left. And they're supposed to be a little better quality than Pilot, from what I've read at a few fora (and much more expensive too wink.gif). So I'm a little confused why I have so many problems with them.

I'll definitely look into Pilot refills though.
post #102 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Hm, thanks, but didn't help. It's mostly the strokes that go from right to left (if that makes any sense to you).

I still think it could be a clogging issue. Repeat the advice until it works. If it does not, keep reading. smile.gif

It could be the paper or ink. Some inks doesn't flow as well as others, and many kinds of paper can lead to skipping, due to the paper not turning the ball properly. That it skips one way and not the other could depend on how you apply different pressure when you angle the pen. Do you use the same ink and paper as before? If you do, I can only think a feed problem or that the ink in the refills has dried out. How old are the refills? Some dry out quicker than others. You could always try and dilute the ink or try another refill. The feed can be sensitive of how you put the refill in. If you press it to far, it can lead to not enough ink reaching the ball. But that should not be dependent on which way you write. Try fiddling with the refill, releasing it some.

I guess my main advice to you is to start experimenting. You're not going to break the pen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post

THANKS for the info; this helps. There is a place near me that stocks both Pilot and Sailor, and once a month they run a 20% off sale... wink.gif
You know my next request... POST SOME PICS of your pens. Would like to see them.

If you're okey with phone camera photos (I have no camera in the office), I've snapped some pictures with my Galaxy S3. I try to post them next week. The pictures are quite bad, so no expectations.
Edited by KlezmerBlues - 9/21/12 at 10:17am
post #103 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by KlezmerBlues View Post


If you're okey with phone camera photos (I have no camera in the office), I've snapped some pictures with my Galaxy S3. I try to post them next week. The pictures are quite bad, so no expectations.

No worries; mine were also snapped with my Iphone and the pens sitting on my desk. So, definitely not a professional job! haha

But, given that this thread probably won't be constantly updated, and give that there aren't many dedicated, informative pen/writing threads, it would be good to put as much as we can on this one while we are all "here" and involved.

Obviously, Fountainpennetwork and such is great, but overwhelming for those just browsing. SF is a place we know, so it's nice to read small threads like this even if the focus of the forum itself isn't directed at that activity (I'd rather read about things here than elsewhere).
post #104 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post

No worries; mine were also snapped with my Iphone and the pens sitting on my desk. So, definitely not a professional job! haha
But, given that this thread probably won't be constantly updated, and give that there aren't many dedicated, informative pen/writing threads, it would be good to put as much as we can on this one while we are all "here" and involved.
Obviously, Fountainpennetwork and such is great, but overwhelming for those just browsing. SF is a place we know, so it's nice to read small threads like this even if the focus of the forum itself isn't directed at that activity (I'd rather read about things here than elsewhere).

No kidding, that's where I got my ink AD from. bottle after bottle after bottle and finally I broke it off!
post #105 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

No kidding, that's where I got my ink AD from. bottle after bottle after bottle and finally I broke it off!

Yep, many of the specialty forums are great, but are tough for a casual viewer. Same with basenotes, thefashionspot, etc. You go thinking, "hey, I like pens. Think I'll take a look" and then see 914,000 different posts about everything including technical blueprints for a nib that cost more than your first car.

Like that cologne your sister gave you for Christmas? Hey, basenotes! BOOM! mathematical analyses of the Chanel date code system, a chemical breakdown of synthetic aoud, and a dissection of why 1978 Labdanum is necessarily different from 1979. lol

That's one thing I like about SF; yeah, it's not a "pen" or fragrance or whatever specialty site, but it's what I'm used to, and where I"m comfortable. It's like your neighborhood bar; the beer selection may not be so great, but sometimes having a 143 page menu of selections is just TOO much. lol8[1].gif
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