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Writing Instruments - Page 6

post #76 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

Great, now you guys have me looking at pens again. FWIW, I use mostly fountains at the office and sometimes at home:
A recent Parker that the gent at Dromgoole's talked me into (writes like a fire hose, unfortunately)
A Lamy Al-Star with 1.1 nib
TWSBI 540 (clear pen, piston-fill) that's pretty much my daily-use.
And unfortunately I've assembled a small herd of inks, too. Will never deplete these bastards.
FWIW, I ended up disassembling and cleaning/greasing the TWSBI but I think I sealed it a bit too well and the nib runs dry after a minute or so or writing. I either have to twist the piston down or let it rest a few minutes before using again. Whoops.

So now in addition to that 2 gallons of Amber Absolute and Chanel PM you've amassed, you've also got a half-gallon of ink, T??? (haha)
Would love to see pics of your pens; snap one and post!
post #77 of 111
Okay, here's the main users.



There's also a Waterman Graduate that I never use, it's just one of those plain silver barrel pens. feh.

And the ink hoard (NOT a half-gallon) but I was looking out for a good blue and these were likely suspects.



A lot of this was Amazon Prime so the prices were decent and I didn't have to drive down to Dromgooles. Nice store, but it's easy to walk out a few hundred dollars lighter after a few minutes.
post #78 of 111
BTW, Rach - when I graduated college I ended up with one of those Parker ball point pens just like yours (but was was green. Place Vendome, if I recall the model). I loved it, but have no idea where it went. After that was a passel of Watermans and then I just stopped carrying nice pens. Or my wife appropriated them. Or both. Right now in a drawer somewhere I have two Waterman ball-points and a Montblanc that my folks found and sent my way. It's nice but I never ever use them.
post #79 of 111
The blue one is a Lamy, right? I've got that one too. Didn't use in years though.

So far, the Lamy 2000 rollerball is doing great. In the future, I may fiddle around with different rollerball miness (e.g. Mont Blanc fits in there.. might get a little expensive over time though, but worth trying out). Really like the esthetics.
post #80 of 111
yep, it's a Lamy al-star and had I bought that one first, I never would have gotten the Parker or the Waterman. It's remarkably hassle-free, easy to change nibs, well-made, and not so expensive that I'm tempted to squirrel it away for "special occasions".

The TSWBI is well-made as well, but twice now people have pulled the back off the pen thinking it was a cap. Both times, ink went everywhere. I keep that one off my desk when I'm not around.
post #81 of 111
Does anyone have any recommendation for someone who wants:

A very fine nib (my non-fountain pens are 0.5mm nibs)
Writes very dry
Has a nib material strong enough to withstand quite a heavy writing style

I appreciate that some of those criteria are at odds with the idea of a fountain pen, but for years I've written with a strength that could carve stone in letters so tiny that some people can't read it. I'd like a grown-up instrument but my style might not make it sensible.

Price is of no object - if its cheap I'll buy it today, if its expensive I will save for a few years and treat myself when an occasion justifies it.
post #82 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

BTW, Rach - when I graduated college I ended up with one of those Parker ball point pens just like yours (but was was green. Place Vendome, if I recall the model). I loved it, but have no idea where it went. After that was a passel of Watermans and then I just stopped carrying nice pens. Or my wife appropriated them. Or both. Right now in a drawer somewhere I have two Waterman ball-points and a Montblanc that my folks found and sent my way. It's nice but I never ever use them.

Yep, the 88 Place Vendome. I think the current version is called the "Rialto," though the green and red lacquer like ours were from the early 1990's. A great online site for parker info is here:
www.parkerpens.net

Being in Japan, which (like everything else) is a paradise of fine oddities, it's easy to pick up neat pens randomly at old shops. As well, working in Japan, you are often given gifts, and when they know you like pens... voila. Hence the Dunhill and the Cartier in my collection (which I'd never have purchased myself)
post #83 of 111
Yep. Sharpie pen is where it's at. Red is great for marking.
post #84 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post

Yep. Sharpie pen is where it's at. Red is great for marking.

I grade papers in anything but red. Just to surprise the students.
post #85 of 111
Maybe I'll pick up a few pink sparkles today. Just to fuck with em.
post #86 of 111
can we talk about penmanship?

i have shitty penmanship. what to do
post #87 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

can we talk about penmanship?
i have shitty penmanship. what to do

Slow down, for starters.

Also, check Alter's penmanship thread.
post #88 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

Slow down, for starters.
Also, check Alter's penmanship thread.

Interesting question and good rec, T. Penmanship is a strange thing for me, and as I was thinking about this post, I realized why. For starters, obviously for grading, notes, and such, I use a pen, but for actual writing... ANY writing... I type. I can type much faster than I can hand write, and so when I try to write an actual document (even a brief letter), it feels very inefficient, slow, and annoying to me, as somebody who has to write a lot.

I realized that there is a brief few years of age that may be in the same boat as me, but not so many. Those born in the late 70's/early 80's, maybe. We were the first group to grow up with computers, and also had typing classes in middle school/high school. SO, we grew up "typing," but didn't have texting or cell phones until college or later. So, we never got out of the habit of, literally, typing everything.

Most of my same-age friends (28-35) from school are also very excellent typists... much faster than handwriting. Most are also very bad texters, and also have crappy penmanship. Younger college students and such are more "versatile" with technology... but most of them aren't particularly good typists.

Anyway, this has nothing to do with the thread, but just something your and Indesertum's posts got me thinking about.
post #89 of 111
Oh yeah, I can type faster than my fastest handwriting (which doesn't look good) and about 3-7x as fast as when I care about how it looks (kinda difficult to guess). I think something about 80wpm, which isn't a lot, but given that it all came naturally and isn't really perfected in any way (I type with all finger but the thumb on my left hand and with my thumb and index finger on my right hand.. Sounds funny, probably is -- and likely inefficient -- but that's how it came to me. Difficult to "retrain" now though because it takes longer when I include more fingers from my right hand..... but should probably start rather sooner than later.

One small question about writing "with your shoulder"... do you literally just move your whole arm to form letters, that is don't really move the wrist/fingers at all? It works, but I write very big that way and it seems a little funny.
post #90 of 111
my typing is loads faster, but i want prettier handwriting when i take notes so i can actually read my chickenscratch later. it's hard when the lecture is going quickly and you need to write a lot of information. and it's odd that a lot of my classes have a no screens policy. -_- old people. making life difficult for young people
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