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Shoes With Character - Page 8

post #106 of 755
Those look like early 20th century doc martens.
post #107 of 755
Doc Martens and the Haferlschuh were meant to be working shoes(blue collar).

So they are related in one way or another
post #108 of 755
Thread Starter 
I wish I could get those flush metal plates on the toes of my shoes.
post #109 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbris1 View Post
I wish I could get those flush metal plates on the toes of my shoes.

Just curious. Where is the problem? A good cobbler should be able to do it.
post #110 of 755
Thread Starter 
Finding the plates and someone to put them on.
post #111 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post
...Haferlschuh were meant to be working shoes(blue collar)....

I really like Haferlschuhe, but they seem to be wearable in only a very small geographic area without looking like a total dong.
post #112 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
I really like Haferlschuhe, but they seem to be wearable in only a very small geographic area without looking like a total dong.

Not if there is enough Griesvelt at home.
post #113 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post
A so called "Haferlschuh"
Not unlike a pair of Paraboot i have:
post #114 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by speedster.8 View Post
Not unlike a pair of Paraboot i have:

Good joke, though I like them.
post #115 of 755
What is the approximate translation into English of "Haferlschuh" and what are the shoe's defining characteristics?
post #116 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
What is the approximate translation into English of "Haferlschuh" and what are the shoe's defining characteristics?

Go here. Go to the bottom and click shoepedia.
post #117 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post
Not if there is enough Griesvelt at home.

My German isn't too fantastic, how does Griesvelt translate into English?
post #118 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
My German isn't too fantastic, how does Griesvelt translate into English?

Put it into the search function(here)... It is not too serious
post #119 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post
Go here. Go to the bottom and click shoepedia.

The pop-up glossary was not at all useful in answering my question.
post #120 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
The pop-up glossary was not at all useful in answering my question.

Haferlschuh is a proper noun, there is no real existing translation.

Schuh = shoe, ok

It derives somewhat from half. In former times people mainly wore boots and this was half of a boot.

The name "halfs" ([ha:vz]) is a homage to the only classic costume shoe - "Haferlschuh". It is not quite certain where the term "Haferlschuh" originates from. According to one assumption, the English term "half" is the origin; others say that the regional term for a coffee mug used in the Bavaria and Austria - "Kaffeehaferl" - served as a patron for the name. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary contains an interesting entry: the English term "half" originates from the Old High German term "halb." Got it?
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