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Justify buying a pair of EGs

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
When they go on sale, I suppose they will be around US $500. I have dozens of shoes but have never spent that much on a pair and never thought I would. I think they are truly beautiful, but are they really worth it? Can I really justifty spending that much on a pair of shoes? Thanks
post #2 of 33
I also have a lot of shoes, but my Grenson Masterpiece's from Bennies are truly remarkable shoes.  Especially for the $150 I paid for shoes that usually go for around $600.  I received an EG catalogue, and they appear to be as good, if not better, than Grensons.  Folks here and at Ask Andy rave about EG and I'm sure it's for good reason.   If you have the $ go for it.  If you have any doubt, see what Grensons Bennies has in your size, but make sure they're from the Masterpiece collection.  If you're patient, Bennies may bid on another 1,000 pair, but the price will be higher.  Call them and ask.
post #3 of 33
If this is a sizable investment make sure you can see yourself wearing them in 10 20 30 years. Which if you have a decent amount of shoes and your not a slob you may be. Btw we really do need some sort formula to figure out worth Any behavior speacalists/accountants out there. We'll need to be able to adjust for income level and for subjective feelings about clothes.
post #4 of 33
Okay, I'll give it a shot utilizing the Universal Body Image Rating Scale or UBIRS , which is based on a scale of 1-10 UBIRS x ((Ego + ID x 2) - superego) x yearly gross income/amount spent on clothes within the past month = Clothes Buying Impulsivity Quotient or CBIQ. Any CBIQ greater than or equal to zero means you may buy the Edward Greens guilt free because you may then say, "I'm worth it." with complete confidence. Try it, it really works.
post #5 of 33
Thread Starter 
it's definitely a lot of money to spend on a pair of shoes, no matter how much you are worth. You can get a pretty nice pair of shoes for less. For me, not only is it a lot of money, by any standard, but it's also a lot... smaller. Do you know what I mean? I mean, a suit that costs thousands of dollars makes sense (to me) because it pretty much covers your whole body. It is the major part of the outfit. Shoes stick out a few inches beyond your trouser. You feel a suit on your whole body. You feel shoes on a little part of your body. To me, a custom suit feels and looks many multiples better than a standard old RTW mediocre suit. It's worth that much more. I like shoes a lot, but are $500 EGs worth 2-3 times more than, says $200 Grensons? I'm sure some of you will take issue with my saying that shoes are a minor part of the outfit. I'm not sure that's exactly what I mean. but I really do see the value in an ultra expensive suit, whereas I have trouble seeing the value in ultra expensive shoes. Don't know if that makes sense. Looking forward to your responses. ZJ
post #6 of 33
The answer is a qualified "yes." First, you have to determine whether you feel comfortable spending the money. Unless you are swimming in dough, we're only talking about an occasional purchase of Greens, such as once a year. I know people that could buy and sell me ten times over, and they would never consider spending more than $100 for shoes. Therefore, you must feel comfortable with the expenditure. If you are uncomfortable with the cost, then you should forego the purchase. Second, on a pure quality and taste level, Edward Greens are the best RTW English shoes. Period. As far as I am concerned, they are better than the Lobb RTW which are more expensive. Hardy Amies in his masterpiece, An Englishman's Suit, said that in order to be well dressed you must buy the best shoes possible. He advocated bespoke shoes although he did not encourage bespoke clothing. He admonished that if you cannot afford bespoke, then buy shoes that look bespoke. Edward Green fits the bill.
post #7 of 33
It is said by some that to judge how well a man is attired, you must first look down at his feet to see how well he is shod. I would concur; to me, a great looking pair of shoes really grounds an outfit (no pun intended). Take an average-looking or just very basic ensemble and add a beautiful pair of shoes to the mix, and you can really pick the whole look up several notches. Personally, I find myself at times choosing my clothing around a particular pair of shoes that I feel like wearing, rather than vice versa. But then, I guess I am shoe-centric
post #8 of 33
I would add, based on your initial disclosure, that I would much rather have a half dozen pairs of really excellent shoes, than "dozens" of just average ones. eom.
post #9 of 33
Hardy Amies told Master Flusser that he bought 1 pair of London Lobb bespoke every two years. He built-up a collection of incomparable shoes. You can do nearly the same with Edward Green. You'll find that the Greens are the centerpiece of your collection. I have discarded many shoes over the years. I've kept the Greens.
post #10 of 33
I believe you can judge a man by the choice of his shoes. What better way to reward something you stand on all day. Whats better, buying three pairs of inferior shoes that might last a couple of years or buying one that could last years with proper care and feel good at the same time. Northampton shoes are by far one of lifes great revenges and you haven't lived till you experience them.
post #11 of 33
Do you know when EG are on sale in their London shop? Thanks.
post #12 of 33
Each January and July they put the shop inventory on sale.
post #13 of 33
Thread Starter 
EG emailed me and said 250 pounds per pair, 40 pounds for shoe trees, plus shipping on both. I also sent them extensive measurements of my feet and a picture, but they wouldn't give me a sizing or last suggestion. I understand you need to try on to determine a perfect fit, but it would still be nice if they could give me a suggestion if I am unable to do that.
post #14 of 33
You probably won't be wearing these shoes for 10, 20, 30 years (as someone else has put it) out of their inherent durability. You'd probably be wearing them for that long because they represent a large chunk of money, and you'll take excellent care of them and get them refurbished when possible. And of course, there's always the occasional curb/puddle/dog/fall on jagged rocks you'll have to worry about. Can you live with these shoes getting damaged? If not, I guess you can buy them and wear them only in the house.
post #15 of 33
Quote:
First, you have to determine whether you feel comfortable spending the money. Unless you are swimming in dough, we're only talking about an occasional purchase of Greens, such as once a year. I know people that could buy and sell me ten times over, and they would never consider spending more than $100 for shoes. Therefore, you must feel comfortable with the expenditure. If you are uncomfortable with the cost, then you should forego the purchase.
This the the crux of it, imo. If they cost you so dearly that you wince at the thought of your precious *investment* getting a gouge in them during course of daily wear (it happens), you shouldn't buy them. I once saw a man act as though it were the end of the world when a waitress accidentally spilt red wine on his expensive leather jacket - demanding napkins to wipe it off immediately, and blotting it continuously for about 10 minutes afterwards. He looked like he was about to cry, and his wife/girlfriend kept having to console him. It was one of the most undignified moments I've ever witnessed. A man with real style wouldn't/shouldn't/couldn't have been bothered in the slightest if a waitress accidently spilled red wine over his new linen bespoke Brioni suit.
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