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Double Vents

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Does anyone consider double vents (side vents) inappropriate for office suits?  I'm getting a bespoke and I'm torn between double vents and a center vent.  For my sportscoats, I prefer the double, but the center vent seems much more conservative and fitting for the office.  Thanks for any advice. ---You can close this question. Reading past posts I clearly know now that double vents are appropriate. Just one of those rookie "why is the sky blue" questions...Initially, the double vent seemed like it was flashier, similar to ticket pockets, and might be construed as too trendy/hip for the office. Thanks for the help. Much appreciated--
post #2 of 14
Why would a double vent be inappropriate? It is a very English detail which hardly breaches any sort of traditional inclination.
post #3 of 14
Center vent is slightly inappropriate, in my opinion.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Center vent is slightly inappropriate, in my opinion.
I wonder if one couldn't make an argument that, because both styles of vents originated as forms that exploit sport or utility, that they both can be considered inappropriate? The single vent gets short shrift from the cognoscenti, and certainly the center vent looks quite elegant (esp. in the American & British films of the 30's).  If the ventless jacket is the apex of style (and please note I write "if"),  the double vent is two steps removed from the center vent. Just musing over it all.
post #5 of 14
Regardless of their origins, the double vent has become a much more stylish look in my opinion. I am not a fan of the single vent, though I must admit that is likely due to its lasting association with the American sack suit rather than any practical reason.
post #6 of 14
Ok, maybe I wrote it too much "shortly". Nothing is really inappropriate, but I think that they are different levels of formality: no vents-double-single. I do not know about american sack suit, I'm just learning about it here and in the other forum. I will just tell you that hardly any Italian - and probably English - tailor will accept to cut you a suit with a single vent. If you ask it, they'll say the single vent is to ride, double for sit, no vents to stand. Ok, that could be wrong, and you can dress single vent as you like, and everyone can be happy. BTW, If you look old movies, you usually see that better dressed man have jackets with no vents at all.
post #7 of 14
Side vents make the overall appearance more sleek and stylish. Also, you can put your hand in a trouser pocket, and the suit will still appear smooth. Lastly, the suit just "drapes" better over the body.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
I do not know about american sack suit, I'm just learning about it here and in the other forum. I will just tell you that hardly any Italian - and probably English - tailor will accept to cut you a suit with a single vent. If you ask it, they'll say the single vent is to ride, double for sit, no vents to stand.
Giona, the single vent is the American standard--probably 70 percent of the mass market suits have a center vent; another 20 percent are no vent; and the remaining 10 percent are double. (Someone in the trade probably has more accurate numbers.) Still, I prefer the double vent, and I agree that it's not too formal for the office. I find the double vent to be more comfortable whether I'm at my desk, standing, or...well...never mind, I don't ride.
post #9 of 14
Ok, I didn't know about this, sorry if it looked rude by me.
post #10 of 14
This is a silly discussion. Ofcourse double vents are appropriate for the office. Single vents are appropriate for the office. No vents are appropriate for the office. Actually, come to think of it, in this world gone mad, I think a "I'm with stupid ---->" t shirt is probably appropriate. 99% of people in the USA dont even know what a vent is, much less give a crap even if they do.
post #11 of 14
While a little silly - the point is true that in the US - it is possible for a person to be uncomfortable with side vented suits. When I was on Wall Street - some 15 years ago - there were few side vented suites among the masses (of course, that was the era of the double breasted suit and olive - ugh). Anyway - just looking at the mainstream stores where most probably do their shopping - the Brooks Brothers, Jos Banks, etc. You simply do not find alot of side vented suits (too expensive to make mass market). In fact - most are either no vents or single. So - while most on this forum feel it is fine to wear to the office - it is a matter of your personal comfort level. I feel that in the US - side vents have always been more dressy and take a little more confidence to pull off. I am still trying to get used to the idea.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
This is a silly discussion. Ofcourse double vents are appropriate for the office.  Single vents are appropriate for the office.  No vents are appropriate for the office.  Actually, come to think of it, in this world gone mad, I think a "I'm with stupid ---->" t shirt is probably appropriate.  99% of people in the USA dont even know what a vent is, much less give a crap even if they do.
exactly. the fact that double vents are less common is irrelevant. the vast majority of people are clueless as to the details of suits.
post #13 of 14
Double vents are appropriate. They neither are old-fashioned nor dandyish. My first real boss wore double vents. If you are considering a single vent so that you'll look like the other guys, then you might as well buy RTW.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
BTW, If you look old movies, you usually see that better dressed man have jackets with no vents at all.
Sorry GG -- that was a typo and I meant of course no vent for the old films.
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