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Do you non-Ivy Leaguers feel inadequate? - Page 6

post #76 of 281
post #77 of 281
I can't remember who posted it, but I agree that ten years out of school, no one cares where you went, merely what you have done.

In a perfect world, do I wish I had gone to an Ivy? Oh, sure thing. I have no doubt I would be further ahead now and in this perfect world, I would have gone into I-banking or something else with higher likely earning potential than my current career track. I think the Ivy's are huge when you first get out, as there are 200+ years of history and alumni that would take great pride/pleasure in getting a grad from their alma a good job.

That, IMO, is the true value of the Ivy.
post #78 of 281
If you get good grades in any school you will get a good job... most likely
I feel schools like Lehigh, Northeastern, Villanova, other private colleges like that that are not at the top of the world, but still provide an excellent education, people at these schools do not feel inferior to ivy leaguers at all..
post #79 of 281
Do any Ivy League grads feel the same in that they may one day have to account for the fact that they were a legacy, bought in or had some other advantage?

Education in this country is heading down the wrong path...at this point an undergraduate degree, especially in liberal arts, is meaningless in terms of professional skills. The Ivy League schools are excellent but I do not think that they should be placed on a pedestal simply because they are older and have higher admission standards. Many people have experienced success without an Ivy degree, hell, the biggest fish out there, at least $ wise, Bill Gates didn't even need the degree.

If I regret anything it is that my primary education allowed me to be complacent because they taught to the lowest standard possible, the same held true in college where B's and A-'s could be had with minimal effort...it all translated in to doing OK on the LSAT and in law school but well below what my actual abilities are. I am always shocked when people suggest we need more $ for college before we address the great disparity in primary education.
post #80 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by samblau View Post
Do any Ivy League grads feel the same in that they may one day have to account for the fact that they were a legacy, bought in or had some other advantage?

I think the legacy issue at Ivies is blown way out of proportion. I don't know of a single private college that doesn't take account of it--it's just that the Ivies are older. At Brown, I had exactly one friend who was a legacy (both parents)--but she was also an excellent student and is currently getting her PhD in history at Stanford. It takes a lot of money to compensate for truly mediocre credentials, and a family legacy alone doesn't generally help you get in if you're outside the statistical range to begin with. It's telling that all of my friends could have gone to multiple other Ivies and top schools for undergrad.

I think 'under-represented' minority students are more likely to feel the sting of knowing they might not have gotten in otherwise. Some become downright militant.
post #81 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
This attitude is no improvement over the snobbery of some Ivy Leaguers--both are sadly removed from reality. The truth is that Ivy League schools are good schools that many people want to go to; they can afford to be selective. It only makes sense that the students will generally be more academically talented. For you to dismiss Ivy League students as nothing but richer versions of non-Ivy students is conveniently presumptive in your favor, and, frankly, ignorant.
HA! You went to an Ivy right? I totally dismiss your point. It stings no? Why not just stand on your own intelligence? Who cares where you went to school? Either you're talented and intelligent or you're not-- who gives a shit where you went to school? Most likely there are more talented people at state colleges in greater numbers simply by virtue of statistics.
post #82 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTGuy View Post
HA! You went to an Ivy right? I totally dismiss your point. It stings no?

This is just sad. You think I should be stung because you dimissed my point without reason. A yo' mama joke woud have been as effective.
post #83 of 281
At Cal, some of us were terribly envious of Stanford. Grade inflation ... you could drop classes 24 hours before the final ... no over-enrollment ... parking ... less chance of life threatening injury from crazy people ... Heaven!
post #84 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
This is just sad. You think I should be stung because you dimissed my point without reason. A yo' mama joke woud have been as effective.
The point is-- I could care less what rationalization you have. You're not better, smarter, or in any way superior to someone who went to a state college (for the record, I didn't). I guess that stings because you've got so much stock in the fact that somehow you're superior because you went to a particular presitigious school, but most likely there's a large group of people out there more successful than you that didn't have the pricey education. For the record WERE your parents upper middle class? In the interest of full disclosure....
post #85 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
At Cal, some of us were terribly envious of Stanford. Grade inflation ... you could drop classes 24 hours before the final ... no over-enrollment ... parking ... less chance of life threatening injury from crazy people ... Heaven!

Apparently, Harvard has a very comprehensive safety net for students whose grades drop. They bring in deans and counselors to make everything better. Perhaps a Harvard student/alum can comment. Brown was grade-cushy, but not that cushy--well, except for the fact that we could elect not to be graded .
post #86 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTGuy View Post
The point is-- I couldn't care less what rationalization you have.
Argh! Fixed. I wish I could say that if you'd gone to an Ivy you wouldn't make that mistake, but you would anyway.

For the record, I'm staying out of the little "Rumble in the Jungle" you and mafoofran are having.
post #87 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTGuy View Post
The point is-- I could care less what rationalization you have.

This really does not help the case for Ivy/non-Ivy parity . . .
post #88 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
well, except for the fact that we could elect not to be graded .

Wait...what???

Jon.
post #89 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
Argh! Fixed. I wish I could say that if you'd gone to an Ivy you wouldn't make that mistake, but you would anyway.

For the record, I'm staying out of the little "Rumble in the Jungle" you and mafoofran are having.

Oh wow-- thanks grammar police! You're so cool!
post #90 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
Wait...what???

Jon.

Don't worry about it Jon. If you were smart enough, they would have let you in and told you about it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTGuy View Post
Oh wow-- thanks grammar police! You're so cool!

I meant to say that people will make that mistake whether they went to an Ivy or not.
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