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Do you non-Ivy Leaguers feel inadequate? - Page 8

post #106 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
Does anyone know if I'm correct in understanding that there are no grades given during a student's first year at Yale Law?

I thought Yale Law didn't grade at all? Certainly that was what made it legendary in the days when Clarence Thomas and the Clintons were there.
post #107 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
Does anyone know if I'm correct in understanding that there are no grades given during a student's first year at Yale Law?

I think this is essentially correct, but you can pass a class with distinction or honors.
post #108 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre Yew View Post
What I posted was hearsay in the early 90s, so I could be completely wrong.

--Andre

Cool. I was just curious because that would be absurd.
post #109 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I thought Yale Law didn't grade at all? Certainly that was what made it legendary in the days when Clarence Thomas and the Clintons were there.

You may well be right. I was under the impression it was only the first year. As you can tell, I didn't go to Yale.
Do you know what the policy at Cal was when Chief Justice Warren was there? I imagine he's one of your favorite jurists.
post #110 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTGuy View Post
You may be a very brilliant guy, but I why be insulted that there are people out there smarter and more successful than you that went to state schools? I know that there are smarter and more successful people than ME out there from Ivies and from state schools-- who cares!

I never doubted or denied that there are others much smarter than me. As for success, I'm still in school, so I really can't claim any. I have never said that all smart people went to an Ivy League school; rather, the point is that Ivy League students are generally smart. You challenged this notion by claiming that Ivy League students are not generally smarter than the average person--according to you, they are only wealthier.
post #111 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
Does anyone know if I'm correct in understanding that there are no grades given during a student's first year at Yale Law?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I think this is essentially correct, but you can pass a class with distinction or honors.
Sort of. There's a pass and a high pass given to the top 10%, IMMSMC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
Do you know what the policy at Cal was when Chief Justice Warren was there? I imagine he's one of your favorite jurists.
Chief Justice and a sleazy male stripper. A model for us all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I never doubted or denied that there are others much smarter than me. As for success, I'm still in school, so I really can't claim any. I have never said that all smart people went to an Ivy League school; rather, the point is that Ivy League students are generally smart. You challenged this notion by claiming that Ivy League students are not generally smarter than the average person--according to you, they are only wealthier.
Save me Raptor Jeebus.
post #112 of 281
I understand that Yale Law gives out Honors, Pass, and Low Pass grades. Most students receive Pass. This is not a bad system if all you want is a high-paying BigLaw job at the end of three years. Many YLS students want to clerk, however, and need to find another way to distinguish themselves. Which means a lot of gunn . . . um, I mean active class participation and conversations with law professors outside of class.

Yale Law is an interesting place. I spent my first summer working with a Yale student who said he didn't learn Erie in his civil procedure class.
post #113 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I never doubted or denied that there are others much smarter than me. As for success, I'm still in school, so I really can't claim any. I have never said that all smart people went to an Ivy League school; rather, the point is that Ivy League students are generally smart. You challenged this notion by claiming that Ivy League students are not generally smarter than the average person--according to you, they are only wealthier.

+1. I agree with this. I mean, it's like how certain college basketball teams are always in the upper echelon in rankings, year after year, after year. Because they have that tradition, and therefore, the best recruits have an interest in it.

That doesn't mean a team like Western Kentucky can't pop up every once in a while and be better than the Dukes/UNCs/UCLAs, it just means that consistently, those schools are the very top, b/c they DO have that history.
post #114 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
I'd venture that mafoofran's arguments do actually make the case for a certain privity, if not parity...

Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
Save me Raptor Jeebus.

I have to admit: half the time, I only half-understand what you're getting at. I can only assume that I've been scornfully disciplined and I should retreat to the corner of the room.
post #115 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
You may well be right. I was under the impression it was only the first year. As you can tell, I didn't go to Yale.
Do you know what the policy at Cal was when Chief Justice Warren was there? I imagine he's one of your favorite jurists.

Cal's Golden Age was probably from the Phoebe Hearst days up through the early '60s. They bought a lot of high priced Ivy League (sorry guys!) talent, and set them up in kick ass houses in Clairemont and the Hills. It was seriously cheap in those days to live there, compared to the East. They had what was basically a top-notch faculty, as good or better than the Ivies. But they focused hardly at all on undergraduate education. And frankly the school was not that selective. If you were really a star, you went to Stanford, or you went back east. So at the undergrad level it was sort of uninspiring, but solid. At the graduate level it was all top of the line. For the Glory of the State!

That is sort of still true, but a lot of it is vapor, the fumes of its past reputation. Clark Kerr took a wrecking ball to the place with his "Master Plan for Higher Education," and Mario Savio and his crew did the rest.
post #116 of 281
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
But my school taught me to be careful of reckless assumptions when making arguments. I also learned that it's foolish to counter a person's argument by attacking his motivations.
Oh give it a fucking rest. Everybody who takes Philosophy 101 learns that.
post #117 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulance Chaser View Post
Yale Law is an interesting place. I spent my first summer working with a Yale student who said he didn't learn Erie in his civil procedure class.
They don't teach jurisdiction in Civ Pro at Berkeley. What is this Erie you speak of?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I have to admit: half the time, I only half-understand what you're getting at. I can only assume that I've been scornfully disciplined and I should retreat to the corner of the room.
No no, entertain us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Cal's Golden Age was probably from the Phoebe Hearst days up through the early '60s. ...That is sort of still true, but a lot of it is vapor, the fumes of its past reputation. Clark Kerr took a wrecking ball to the place with his "Master Plan for Higher Education," and Mario Savio and his crew did the rest.
A friend who was a grad student there told me that there are still parking spaces marked "Reserved for Nobel Prize Winners" on campus. Another time. Sigh.
post #118 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I never doubted or denied that there are others much smarter than me. As for success, I'm still in school, so I really can't claim any. I have never said that all smart people went to an Ivy League school; rather, the point is that Ivy League students are generally smart. You challenged this notion by claiming that Ivy League students are not generally smarter than the average person--according to you, they are only wealthier.


You're a little ridiculous. You take issue with me saying that on average Ivy league students are wealthier and you have a blog where you post your custom made clothing purchased while you are still a student....

Ivy league students generally are pretty intelligent (I said this in my original post), but not of any more exceptional intelligence than students at many of the fine state schools across this country.
post #119 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
They don't teach jurisdiction in Civ Pro at Berkeley. What is this Erie you speak of?

No no, entertain us.


A friend who was a grad student there told me that there are still parking spaces marked "Reserved for Nobel Prize Winners" on campus. Another time. Sigh.

That's awesome.
post #120 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
They don't teach jurisdiction in Civ Pro at Berkeley. What is this Erie you speak of?

No no, entertain us.


A friend who was a grad student there told me that there are still parking spaces marked "Reserved for Nobel Prize Winners" on campus. Another time. Sigh.

Yes, in front of the Physics Lecture Hall on Mining Circle. I don't think that actually is another time, I think it still exists.

I must say, architecturally, it is a magnificent campus in most respects. Much better than Stanford, which we used to derided as the World's Largest Taco Bell.

Wait, are we allowed to bash other schools in this thread, or is that snobbish?
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