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Storage of ties? - Page 2

post #16 of 26
Rolling ties is the only way to remove wrinkles and creases left by a knot. Hold the tail end of the tie between your thumb and index finger and roll the tie around your index and middle finger. Allow the tie to rest that way for a day or two. Then you can return them to a rack or a drawer. Also, in regards to untying your necktie, to reduce wrinkles,warping and destroying the fabrics and linings, you should always slip the tie down enough so that you can untie the tie in reverse of the way you tied it. I've seen many a man slide his tie knot off the tail of the tie and that is sure death to its longevity.
post #17 of 26
Thread Starter 
If rolling is OK then that is what I am going to do. I also like the point of being able to see them easier. THANKS
post #18 of 26
Quote:
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(ernest @ 10 Nov. 2004, 9:30) 200 cadies at $5 = $1 000...........
Ya gotta' spend it on something....besides, if you by them 24 at a time from Neckties.com, they only cost $4.25
Why not simply hanging them on a hanger which you will cover with a sheet to pretect form dust? You will save $1 000, room, time and your ties will look better.
post #19 of 26
To get out creases, I'm a big fan of tie presses. They have the great Victorian look, you can get them fairly cheap in London antiques stores, or eBay, and they're a fantastic conversation piece. Low WAF, though, if you keep them all over the house.
post #20 of 26
If you mean the wooden devices that clamp down on your tie, I would be wary of using one of those.. Is that what you're talking about? Also, WAF=?
post #21 of 26
Quote:
If you mean the wooden devices that clamp down on your tie, I would be wary of using one of those.. Is that what you're talking about?
Yes. I've found they work very well.
Quote:
Also, WAF=?
Wife Appreciation Factor.
post #22 of 26
Don't they smoosh the silk making the tie thinner though? Or are they padded inside or something?
post #23 of 26
Personally would stay away from generally pressing a tie, when not necessary.  Will kill the roll of the tie (Flatten the edges that shouldnt be flattened but rolled) The tie is supposed to have a little height to it and not be razor sharp at the edges. Also if the tie has a little depth to the texture you might kill that as well. But...If it works for you... As far as WAF...I first thought World Armwrestling Federation, or Women in Air Force, But with a little more digging with Google, came up with this... Wife Acceptance Factor JJF EDIT: Why would you need to have these little Tie Mashers all around the house?
post #24 of 26
I do it lightly and for short periods, and haven't had a problem. I'm sure that if you really clamped it down and left it there, it wouldn't be the best thing. Did I mention they look really great? Even if you don't use them.
post #25 of 26
I've a great Edwardian era tie press bought in London that I use for my ties. Beautiful veneered top on it. At any rate, I find if you don't press the tie as if you were making wine that it does no damage to the tie. That and only keep the tie in there for a few hours. And as has been said, they look nice and they are a conversation starter. Most people have no idea what it is -- O tempora, O mores. -- until I tell them.
post #26 of 26
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I had a couple ties that were creased and steamed them to no effect, I haven't tried this rolling trick yet though.  I hang my ties from a motorized rack which has worked well so far.
I, too, have gone the "motorized" route (sharper Image). Saves space, and let's me get at the tie I'm after quickly... JV
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