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Tricker 1829 Collection

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I recently discovered this site and after lurking for awhile,I've decided to make my first posting. (Great site,by the way.). I have been lookin for a classic wing-tip,but most of the lasts used are not very elegant. Does the box-toe on the 1829 line work OK with the classic styling of a wing-tip? Can they be dressed up and down? Any info. on this line will also be appreciated.TIA.
post #2 of 11
Are you talking about this model? I think that the toe looks very sophisticated -- not exactly bespoke, but very attractive. It works well with the wingtip pattern. I have no personal experience with Tricker's shoes, but I've been very impressed with the pictures that I've seen -- channelled soles, high-quality leathers, etc., and the prices are right. Others on this forum and the Ask Andy forum have had a lot of nice things to say about the quality of construction.
post #3 of 11
Quote:
I recently discovered this site and after lurking for awhile,I've decided to make my first posting. (Great site,by the way.). I have been lookin for a classic wing-tip,but most of the lasts used are not very elegant. Does the box-toe on the 1829 line work OK with the classic styling of a wing-tip? Can they be dressed up and down? Any info. on this line will also be appreciated.TIA.
Trickers' quality is superb. Better than benchgrade C&J and approaching that of C&J handgrade. An excellent value for money. The last shapes are not quite as elegant as C&J's though, but they are undoubtedly classic shapes for classic shoes.
post #4 of 11
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(hasa @ 09 Nov. 2004, 10:35) I recently discovered this site and after lurking for awhile,I've decided to make my first posting. (Great site,by the way.). I have been lookin for a classic wing-tip,but most of the lasts used are not very elegant. Does the box-toe on the 1829 line work OK with the classic styling of a wing-tip? Can they be dressed up and down? Any info. on this line will also be appreciated.TIA.
Trickers' quality is superb. Better than benchgrade C&J and approaching that of C&J handgrade. An excellent value for money. The last shapes are not quite as elegant as C&J's though, but they are undoubtedly classic shapes for classic shoes.
I was on Jermyn St. not too long ago -- admiring Trickers. Sorry I can't offer anything concrete as I didn't buy -- but I should have. This in addition to the split-toe Norweg. cordovan Alden blucher, will be my next shoe purchase. I really like the tough as lead look of the Tricker country line. I am a little reluctant to attempt a pair from pediwear as I want to insure best fit.
post #5 of 11
I own a pair of Trickers loafers; they are nice but not as nice as churchs
post #6 of 11
I've had Trickers shoes both direct from England and years ago when they were Dunhill's house brand, in both penny loafers and captoes. They're durable and well-made. With the skyrocketing costs for C&J, they're an attractive alternative (but there are few selections in the wider fittings except for the plain captoe).
post #7 of 11
Horace, I have respected your literacy and high level of erudition. Anyone who can cite Werner Jaeger's Paideia in a clothing forum has got to be a man I respect. (I have the set, read it 40-odd years ago, don't remember much, if anything, from it.) However, I am at a loss to understand what you mean by "tough as lead." Lead is one of the most soft and malleable elemental metals around. Unalloyed, it is easily gouged with a thumbnail. (I used to do a lot of bullet casting until I felt it might be affecting my health adversely, so I do know my way around lead.)
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Horace, I have respected your literacy and high level of erudition. Anyone who can cite Werner Jaeger's Paideia in a clothing forum has got to be a man I respect. (I have the set, read it 40-odd years ago, don't remember much, if anything, from it.) However, I am at a loss to understand what you mean by "tough as lead." Lead is one of the most soft and malleable elemental metals around. Unalloyed, it is easily gouged with a thumbnail. (I used to do a lot of bullet casting until I felt it might be affecting my health adversely, so I do know my way around lead.)
JLibourel- You're almost there, given the bullet casting comment.... Think of bullets made from lead. Then "tough as lead" would mean "bulletproof". As least, that's how I read it.
post #9 of 11
However, "tough as lead" is not very common. I only got one quasi-legitimate hit on google..... and amazon's inside the book search turned up "tough as a lead pipe", with everything else seemingly garbage. So there you guys go. I'm not touching this issue again...
post #10 of 11
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(JLibourel @ 20 Nov. 2004, 9:09) However, I am at a loss to understand what you mean by "tough as lead." Lead is one of the most soft and malleable elemental metals around. Unalloyed, it is easily gouged with a thumbnail. (I used to do a lot of bullet casting until I felt it might be affecting my health adversely, so I do know my way around lead.)
Quote:
JLibourel- You're almost there, given the bullet casting comment.... Think of bullets made from lead.  Then "tough as lead" would mean "bulletproof".   As least, that's how I read it.
JL and NVG: I don't know what I was thinking -- lead is malleable (and I am trying to recall where it is on the periodical chart) -- I have no idea why I wrote that. Maybe I was thinking "tough as a bullet" -- and I cannot recall the figure of speech where you take one quality of something and extract from it the meaning for the whole -- it's not metonmy, I don't think. Maybe I picked up the phrase from that much neglected genre of American fiction -- the noir crime novels of Chandler, Hammett, etc. Let me get back to you on this.
post #11 of 11
heavy as lead. tough as nails...?
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