or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Jacket buttons
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Jacket buttons

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
What do you think of suit jackets which allow all the buttons, even the bottom one, to be buttoned? I know the last button isn't traditionally buttoned, but I'm sure there are suit jackets not doing this. Personally, even though I don't own one, I prefer a jacket which can have all buttons buttoned, because it looks more complete that way. Otherwise, I ask myself, what is the third button or second button for? For display? The button can't even be seen clearly... If I were to leave the last button unbuttoned, I would have opted for a high-stance two-button jacket instead. Just my opinion, though. What's yours? WJTW
post #2 of 16
Style is about being imperfect in just the right way. Last jacket button is a perfect example of that. Last button done up looks too staid to be stylish.
post #3 of 16
I have no intention of breaking tradition at this time, or in making the suits look strange. I will keep leaving the bottom button unbuttoned (say that three times fast). However, now that you mention it, I am giving it some thought. I think the story behind the bottom jacket button is that a King was so fat he wasn't able to button it. For such reason it became tradition. Said that... Making suits with a non-functional bottom button is an ode to obesity. Maybe someone should impose some tradition as an ode to thinness. Just some morning thoughts
post #4 of 16
I've never seen a sports coat or suit jacket that has a non-functioning bottom button. Is this a new thing?
post #5 of 16
Quote:
I've never seen a sports coat or suit jacket that has a non-functioning bottom button.  Is this a new thing?  
It depends on what you mean by non-functioning.  Certainly there should be both a button on one side and a buttonhole on the other side; in that sense, it's a functioning button.  Some tailors and makers, however, cut the jacket so that the front below the waist button is quite "open", or cut diagonally from the waist button on each side so that the edges do not hang straight, but form an inverted "V".  On such coats, buttoning the bottom button is impossible without scrunching the two sides together, forcing open the vents in back, and throwing off the balance of the coat.
post #6 of 16
Some say that it is somwhat crass to leave the bottom button unfastened. I wouldn't go that far, but I do believe that it is only necessary if the wearer of the coat thinks this is the only distinguishing mark of the coat itself and feels it should be exploited for others to see. If a coat is well made, well cut and from a good fabric, then leaving a cuff button unfastened, well, it speaks volumes. I have a client from West Virginia, I've been making his clothes since about 1969. He loves clothes as much as the members of this forum. He is height challenged, weight challenged, but extremely bright. he was, at one time, the youngest supreme court justice in the English speaking world (as the article I read once stated) His biggest problem was that he hailed from Charleston. So, he is staying at Claridges with his girlfriend from NY. they are invited to a dinner party by his his girlfriends ex boyfriend who, seing this height and weight challenged person with a funny accent, decides to have some fun with him. Eventually, after much verbal sparring, they get round to clothes. Seeing that Richard has all his cuff buttons buttoned he says to all around that it was plain his suits were superior because his bottom two holes were functional. At which time Richard responded that all four of his cuff holes are functional. Now, what this story proves, I don't know. but I think there's a little something there to think about.
post #7 of 16
Sorry, I've just re-read the first post and realized the topic was about front buttons and not cuff buttons.
post #8 of 16
I think we are talking about two different things here. I took the original post to be asking about the coat's "main" buttons, i.e., the waist button and the other (bottom) button on a two-button coat, or the other two (bottom and top) buttons on a three-button coat. Len's post seems to be about sleeve buttons. That said, I agree that there is somthing showy about leaving sleeve buttons unbuttoned. But the bottom button on a 2 or 3 button SB coat should always be left unbuttoned. I also think that on DB coats, either the bottom button or the waist button should be left undone. It looks bad to button both. Prince Charles buttons both all the time, and I think he would look so much better if he undid the bottom button.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Some say that it is somwhat crass to leave the bottom button unfastened.  I wouldn't go that far, but I do believe that it is only necessary if the wearer of the coat thinks this is the only distinguishing mark of the coat itself and feels it should be exploited for others to see.  If a coat is well made, well cut and from a good fabric, then leaving a cuff button unfastened, well, it speaks volumes. I have a client from West Virginia, I've been making his clothes since about 1969.  He loves clothes as much as the members of this forum.  He is height challenged, weight challenged, but extremely bright.  he was, at one time, the youngest supreme court justice in the English speaking world (as the article I read once stated)  His biggest problem was that he hailed from Charleston.  So, he is staying at Claridges with his girlfriend from NY.  they are invited to a dinner party by his his girlfriends ex boyfriend who, seing this height and weight challenged person with a funny accent, decides to have some fun with him.  Eventually, after much verbal sparring, they get round to clothes.  Seeing that Richard has all his cuff buttons buttoned he says to all around that it was plain his suits were superior because his bottom  two holes were functional.  At which time Richard responded that all four of his cuff holes are functional.   Now, what this story proves, I don't know.  but I think there's a little something there to think about.
That sounds just petty. If someone ever held themselves over me because you could unbutton 4 buttons on the jacket sleeve I'd have such a good belly laugh I'd probably have super human lungs by the time I'm done. What a my daddy can beat up your daddy argument.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
That sounds just petty. If someone ever held themselves over me because you could unbutton 4 buttons on the jacket sleeve I'd have such a good belly laugh I'd probably have super human lungs by the time I'm done. What a my daddy can beat up your daddy argument.
In the spirit of "my daddy can beat up your daddy", I note that (if I read the story correctly) the guy with four functioning buttonholes didn't start the argument. The other guy did. Len's customer was just putting a pompous jacka$$ in his place.
post #11 of 16
Bottoning the bottom bottom button is for girls...
post #12 of 16
I have only seen clueless Germans (what is with Germanic men and their terrible sense of style?) and many few American men do this. Usually, these are the same unintentional gay vogue imitators who leave the sleeve label of their jackets on.
post #13 of 16
Several of the TV weather guys in LA do the all-buttons-closed look, and frankly that's the least of their sartorial problems. However, if the current trend in hiring continues, they'll all soon be replaced by women who favor short skirts and tight sweaters.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
However, if the current trend in hiring continues, they'll all soon be replaced by women who favor short skirts and tight sweaters.
Yes. Please.
post #15 of 16
I recently crashed a party held at a very nice hotel's banquet room, and hosted by a Business Frat from a prestigious local private University (very very long story). We were getting dirty looks because of our attire - sans suits (since we crashed the party, and weren't anticipating on being anywhere like that). However, I noticed so many fashion blunders - all buttons done-up, navy jackets with black pants, ties hanging 2+" below the bottom of the belt buckle, huge clunky Sketchers-style shoes worn with suits, 4-button suits with the top 3 buttons fastened, more dark-tie darker-shirt combos than I'd like to count (along with many Regis impersonators - that is, matching shirt and tie), Horribly baggy suits and pleated pants on slim guys, etc.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Jacket buttons