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How to become stylish

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm trying to help out one my friends dress well and look cool, etc... This guy has no clue about fashion or style, so what do you think I could do to help him out? I can't take him shoppping or anything, he's in Cali right now. I'm asking because I don't think he could pull of my personal style. What advice do you think would help? Can you really teach someone to become stylish.
post #2 of 19
I would not recommend this forum as a place to ask this question. The demographic represented here is a preciously tiny segment of the market which favours ultra high end craftsmanship and conservative looks. If that's what they're going for, and have the cash, then I'd say this is the place to ask. But for younger styles, I really find this isn't a good place. I come here for more formal dress type things and to learn about finer garments. I don't think one could really benefit from the advice given here for like... clubbing wear.
post #3 of 19
Quote:
Can you really teach someone to become stylish.
Sure, probably. I think I learned to be stylish, rather than being born with an innate sense of style. (This post is currently missing pieces that I'm drawing a blank on. Editing now...) Obviously we can't say "Buy some jeans and a cool shirt, you'll look great." or "Buy a suit, you'll look great." because we don't know what he looks like, and we don't know if he'd be comfortable in those getups. Ask him who he thinks is stylish - be they actors, musicians, sports stars, or just people he knows. Ask him why he thinks that. This can give you a sense of what he likes and dislikes in terms of clothing he doesn't already own, and what he might feel comfortable in. (This also helps, insofar as you might find that someone he thinks is stylish has a similar body type to him, so you can steer him in the direction of clothing that won't make him look ridiculous.) Do you know what kinds of activities he gets up to, or wants to get up to? You could suggest to him that he buys a few pieces for everyday, something for dates/clubbing, a couple of things for work... I would initially suggest that any new things he buy be relatively nondescript - plain t-shirts, jeans with pretty normal washes, a solid suit - so that he can mix and match them and not be known as 'that guy that wears that striped shirt every second day'. Perhaps, if he's interested, he could buy one or two 'fashiony' pieces for special 'going-out' occasions. If he needs a suit, show him the Flusser Fashionmall text here: http://www.fashionmall.com/flusser_b...x_current.html so he'll know how one should fit. I have no idea if there's a guide anywhere for how casualwear should fit - maybe just get him to check out some streetwear brand websites? - but he could always just ask over here. Also, since you're not going shopping with him, tell him to remember one little piece of advice: Clothing salespeople will tell you anything - including outright lies -  in order to get you to buy what they have to sell. If he sees something he likes, get him to use the phrase, "I'll think about it", followed by a quick e-mail to his good buddy Mike C.
Quote:
But for younger styles, I really find this isn't a good place. I come here for more formal dress type things and to learn about finer garments
I think you've missed a lot of streetwear threads. And I mean a lot. If anything, Andy's is the conservative forum - this is the hip one.
post #4 of 19
For me it works like this: 1) see something I think is interesting. 2) wear it around people and see how it fits with me and what I'm doing. 3) keep it or put it away. My advice would be to get him exposed to as many sources of different styles as you can so he can look at different things. That expands the pool he has to pick items he likes from. Then encourage him to wear different stuff in different situations to get a feel for how different clothing works in different ways. To do this he needs to be willing to go a bit outside his comfort zone.
post #5 of 19
Quote:
I would not recommend this forum as a place to ask this question. The demographic represented here is a preciously tiny segment of the market which favours ultra high end craftsmanship and conservative looks. If that's what they're going for, and have the cash, then I'd say this is the place to ask. But for younger styles, I really find this isn't a good place. I come here for more formal dress type things and to learn about finer garments. I don't think one could really benefit from the advice given here for like... clubbing wear.
PHV, With all due respect, you've been here for 2 months. Mike C. has been here for 2 years, since the inception of the forum. While it is true that recently, there has been more discussion of conservative, tailored clothing, than of denim and streetwear, the population of forum members interested in that part of the clothing spectra is not significant. There have been *many* threads on these subjects. As for helping your friend, I agree with Nick's suggestions. Get him to describe to you a few celebrities he would consider stylish and would like to emulate to some degree, and suggest some basic pieces and brands accordingly. Direct him towards colors and cuts you think would fit him and that he would like. Push his limits a *little*, but don't try to coerce him too far from his comfort zone.
post #6 of 19
It should be added that a working knowledge of color is vitally important, and will serve your friend well no matter what his fashion tastes. Art books or classes are an excellent and fun way to learn this skill.
post #7 of 19
LA Guy, I think that as the winter fast approaches, more discussion turns to tailored clothing -- both because it is being seen more on the runway, and because the weather makes suits even more appropriate. I agree that there are often threads on casual wear -- though topics on pure "streetwear" seem to be few and far between except for discussion on jeans (for instance, we rarely see discussions on t-shirts).
post #8 of 19
I had a client in London called David Hicks. Only ever would wear a plain gray suit with a white shirt. I'd receive a call from him and all he would say was "another suit please Logsdail" Yet, because of his attidude and bearing, when he walked into a room, people stopped and looked. Sometimes, it's not only the style of the clothes, but the style of the man that says the most.
post #9 of 19
Insperation is what you need to be in certain style. Without it, you would not care what you wear or how you look. My version of inperation was characters from movies I love. The Untouchable, De Niro characcter in Heat, Tom Cruise's suit in MI2, the way governator wears his suit with english collar shirt without tie, stuff like that. No one had to influence me. I just knew it and felt it that it was for me.
post #10 of 19
I agree with most of whats been said so far. Attitude defenitely makes the outfit, if you are cool and you know it you make whatever you wear stylish. But a great way to get started is like others have said, is to pick some movies or celebrities he likes and help him out with some designers or places to go. I started out basing my wardrobe off of Cruel Intentions, and have branched out since then to include many other styles. Depending on how old he is, I would suggest H&M, they have trendy clothes with good fits very cheap. Its seems to be my little secret in the DC area among people I know, because few realize they make clothes for men. How old is your friend? Eric
post #11 of 19
Quote:
I started out basing my wardrobe off of Cruel Intentions, and have branched out since then to include many other styles.
I like Cruel Intentions, but I don't think Sebastian Valmont wore anything attractive in that movie.
post #12 of 19
Then you probably wouldn't consider me a very good dresser. I liked the blue shirt with black slacks he wore, I get compliments on that outfit everytime I where it, I have an extremely blue shirt. His coat in that movie was very nice. And the grey T-shirt with black pinstriped slacks looked good and is another outfit from the movie I wear occasionaly. I think for the most part Valmont dressed very well in the movie. E
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Then you probably wouldn't consider me a very good dresser.  I liked the blue shirt with black slacks he wore, I get compliments on that outfit everytime I where it, I have an extremely blue shirt. His coat in that movie was very nice. And the grey T-shirt with black pinstriped slacks looked good and is another outfit from the movie I wear occasionaly. I think for the most part Valmont dressed very well in the movie. E
Oh yes, I would make an exception for the blue shirt (perfect shade) that he wore near the escalator I liked his attitude more than his wardrobe though. I think Ryan P. appeared better in Igby Goes Down. I've been looking for a shirt in that shade of blue. May I ask where did you find yours?
post #14 of 19
Gregory, I was on a quest for that shirt a few years ago, and finally found it one day at Structure, but alas it was in short sleeve. Then a few months later I found it again in long sleeve, but not in my size, so I special ordered it. As you may know Structure is now Express for Men, they don't carry this color anymore but still have many many good colors, especially in blue. Eric
post #15 of 19
Excellent question, I will try to answer it with examples that I had recently.    First, as a few has mentioned before in this thread(I apologize in advance for not referencing names as I am a bit lazy right now), style is something that you have to feel. To define style, I would say "Style is knowing the rules and then breaking them accordingly".  It's almost like the difference between something that is scientific and artistic. Although many of us talk about the technical details of a suit(this is the scientific part), when I started the thread about suit silhouettes, the main goal was to talk more about the artistic side of suit design.  Now it's obvious that art can be broken down into technical terms more or less(Manton did that quite well).   If you want to teach him to be stylish, here is what I see is possible.  That statement on style is a bit vague so let me elaborate more on it.  Some people have this innate sense of style while others don't his left from his right.  I believed Napeleon said, "What one doesn't achieve through birth, one can achieve through effort".  For me, my dad, uncle, grand uncles all had a sense of style.  But just cause of that doesn't mean all of a sudden I know what works for me, it has to be something that is developed. The only way I think a person can be stylish is to be exposed to anything and everything, finally picking out the ones that works for you.  I would not go as far as to say all of us have style within us but I can say with 100% accuracy that all of us has worked on it to the point using clothes to better "represent ourselves". So to sum it up, here are the main bullets to follow: 1) Expose him to as much as possible. 2) Explain the "rules" but make sure he understands they are just guidelines at best. 3) Have him pick up stuff that he is comfortable with, giving ideas along the way. 4) Never force any of your ideas on him unless this guy is totally clueless. 5) Make sure he doesn't ask a woman's advice unless she truly has style and is not a fashion whore. Now, let me end it with this.  I think most people can develop a certain level of style.  But some will just be clueless as if you never taught him.  I had experiences with both.  What most likely will end up is this guy will look presentable but not stylish.  There, I just wasted minutes of your life that you can never get back....  
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