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What do you miss from your younger days? - Page 4

post #46 of 69
Getting away from the physical, i.e. having an 18 year old body, here is why many fully fledged adults miss their younger days:

Life is about trade offs. For instance, I would love to go spend four months in Europe bumming around. However, I would lose my hard earned job if I did. That would be stupid. When you are 18 or 20 or even 24, you can make the choice to go to Europe and probably not suffer lasting harm from the consequences. When you are 36, married, with a house, cars, etc, you would be an idiot to make that choice.

Growing up is about having to make trade offs and we miss the time in our life when having to chose did not carry the consequences it does now.
post #47 of 69
Just being innocent and naively thinking that everyone was a good person.

Now of course we all lock our doors, grab tightly onto our murses, walk circles around teenagers, and look at everyone else with a suspicious eye.
post #48 of 69
I'm 22 so still a young'yun, but I've learned a few already.

I miss REAL friends. The friends you could count on, that would give their life and you would give yours for. The older you get, the harder it is to find and make these sorts of friends with.

That, and the old friends are fading away. It seems like everyone I know is in a race to get married, buy a house , and have kids as fast as possible.....and not necessarily in that order. People my age, at least around here, have a scary attitude that they must grow up as quickly as possible.....

I miss the lack of responsibility and time. This has been building to a crescendo; high school to college, having a steady job, and now once I'm through with school and start a 'real' full-time job, I will mark that as the death of my youth.
post #49 of 69
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludeykrus View Post
I miss REAL friends. The friends you could count on, that would give their life and you would give yours for. The older you get, the harder it is to find and make these sorts of friends with.

You're not the first person to mention this and the very concept just baffles me.

As I see it, one of two things is happening to all of you:

1. You aren't doing enough to foster real friendships, or
2. You are romanticizing your earlier friendships.

Let's face it, friendships you made when a teen (or earlier) are seldom based on some deep philosophical connection. These friendships are formed when you are young and, to a great degree, dumb. But it doesn't mean they won't last. What do you do to keep these friends?

And what are you doing to meet new ones?

Of my two closest friends (aside from my wife), one I have known since HS (some 20 years now) and the other I met in grad school (about 12 years now).



b
post #50 of 69
What I miss most about my youth is the feeling that all future paths were open to me and that I was free to unroll my road in any direction I chose.
post #51 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
What I miss most about my youth is the feeling that all future paths were open to me and that I was free to unroll my road in any direction I chose.

+1 I said something similar in an earlier post but you verbalized it perfectly.
post #52 of 69
Being carefree.......
post #53 of 69
It's probably been mentioned before but I miss spending time with my family.

Oh, and not caring while in my little elementary school "relationships"




It was just so much easier back then.
post #54 of 69
I miss being 7 and thinking everybody was a good person
post #55 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
+1 I said something similar in an earlier post but you verbalized it perfectly.
Thanks, though I meant something slightly different from your post. I was thinking about the sense of running out of time and how different that is from the excitement of limitless possibility. Though it is also true that the tradeoff driven choices you make today have the effect of slamming doors to the future shut, doors you might be able to reopen someday if you only had enough time. That is part of it.
post #56 of 69
California.

Reading certain books, or listenting to certain pieces of music, for the first, second and third times.

All night philosophy bull sessions.
post #57 of 69
Bringing back an older thread since I apparently missed this.

I do MORE than enough to fost new friendships, and go out on a limb all the time to garner very close, true friendships. Trust me, if you knew me you'd understand. I may be romanticizing old friendships a bit, but I think it's more a sense of nostalgia.

It is quite a confusing concept, I know. My only real explanation is that when you are younger, it is easier to prove your friendship to someone. You actually got into situations where danger (real or imagined) is present and another must make a sacrifice for a friend. These relationships were tested more often, and therefore stronger bonds were formed. Someone either looked at you in a time of need and said "yes" or "no".

I also think that attitude changes have a lot to do with this. When you don't have too much (real) responsibility, friendships are easier to focus on. I have had quite a many friends just 'give up' on every one of their friends to pursue a girl (or guy). They push to get into a serious relationship as early in life as possible, and neglect everyone else that has been there for them for a decade. The funny thing is I have probably 4-5 people I know where now their relationships have fallen through (even after years of marriage), and now they're left without any friends at all. Some come back and start talking like the old times, but it's awkward because it's hard to jump right back into something like that after years of no communication.

Then there's the fact that so many people are busy building school and work careers, relationships, houses, etc....when you are friendly to them, they will be 'acquaintance' friendly towards you, but won't go out of their way at all to build a good friendship with you. Changing attitudes and circumstances make things harder.

Eh, enough rambling. It's a subject I know, but simply can't communicate it very clearly.

Anyone else feel the same, maybe can word it better?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808 View Post
You're not the first person to mention this and the very concept just baffles me.

As I see it, one of two things is happening to all of you:

1. You aren't doing enough to foster real friendships, or
2. You are romanticizing your earlier friendships.

Let's face it, friendships you made when a teen (or earlier) are seldom based on some deep philosophical connection. These friendships are formed when you are young and, to a great degree, dumb. But it doesn't mean they won't last. What do you do to keep these friends?

And what are you doing to meet new ones?

Of my two closest friends (aside from my wife), one I have known since HS (some 20 years now) and the other I met in grad school (about 12 years now).

b
post #58 of 69
Women, with no consequences or guilt..
post #59 of 69
^ Or STD's...
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post #60 of 69
sorry!

see next post
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