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Forbes Most Expensive Suits - Page 2

post #16 of 42
How odd. The World's Just A Ball Of Confusion. I'm sure I read somewhere that matching the pocketsquare with the tie was considered 'trying too hard'; I remember being aghast because that's what I did at uni. Is having the same material and colour frowned on, instead of 'toning' them? Or does it really not matter at all?
post #17 of 42
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To be kind, manton, do you think the reason the Liana Lee suit looked egg-like might be because the mannequin it was on was too big? On reflection, I doubt that could entirely account for the ugliness of the suit -- the lapels were aircraft- carrier wide and apparently covered part of the breast pocket...
I can live with having the breast pocket's corner slightly covered. But the lapel width and shape are unforgivable. And that coat looks like it's falling off the shoulders. If it's true that it's just badly placed on the mannequin, then what does it say about Ms. Lee that when photographers come to shoot her clothes for inclusion in an article like this, she doesn't do everything possible to show them off at their best?  One may not like the pattern in the Huntsman photo, but one has to admit that they did manage to show their silhouette to advantage. Also, anyone who charges $5,000 for a suit ought to know that double stitching the lapel's edges is simply an affront. There are very few garments on which that kind of double stitching works, and dark worsted business suits are not among them.
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The Jay Kos MTM looked truly awful and scoops the fugly awards for me -- the fellow it was on looked like he had the proportions of Barney.
Meet Jay Kos.  At least he's up front that the suit is MTM.
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What did you think of Lennie's creations?
I think they are exquisitely made, and fit perfectly (the best fit in the business) but the silhouette is not to my taste.  It's a little stiffer than I like, with a tighter chest and blade area.  Also, I prefer a more sloped shoulder.  And why did he put brass buttons on that windowpane coat?  I suppose the customer must have asked for it, but it looks odd to me.
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I'm a bit surprised that Alan Flusser didn't figure in there somehow -- thought he had his finger in many pots.
Flusser is not that expensive.
post #18 of 42
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Is having the same material and colour frowned on, instead of 'toning' them?  Or does it really not matter at all?
It's better to have the materials "clash": linen or wool sqaure with silk ties; silk squares with linen or wool (or cashmere) ties. This is not iron-clad, however. Squares that precisely match the color and/or pattern of the tie look bad; sort of like you lack imagination. Plain white linen almost always works. Or the square can reflect the color of the shirt. Or, if the square has a lot of colors, it can accent (without matching) one or more of the colors of the tie.
post #19 of 42
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Good lord.  I love expensive suits as much -- maybe more -- than the next guy, but this is preposterous.  The prices are offensive.  And the quality, from what I could tell of the underlit photos in that slide show, was almost (but not quite) uniformly underwhelming.  The Lianna Lee coat in particular looked awful.  
Who cares what the suits look like when you can buy them for 20K? These types of articles would be offensive, if they weren't so damn pathetic.  It reminds me of that joke about the Russian mobster who thought himself sartorially superior to a friend of his because he bought for $400 the same tie that his friend got for a mere $200.  Sad, really.  I imagine that people who read Forbes and take it seriously are the same type of people who consider Donald Trump classy.  I love it when he looks into the camera with that expression he picked up from Goodfellas and says "I'm very proud of XYZ.  It's classy.  It's one of the classiest places in the world."
post #20 of 42
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Who cares what the suits look like when you can buy them for 20K?
That reminds me... IMMSMC, there is a tailor in London's Savile Row by the name of James and James, which offers a fully handmade bespoke suit for 20,000 dollars (or is it pounds?). Every stitch on the suit is by hand; apparently they will deliver it by helicopter to you. Remarkably, they have had commissions. I do not know if they still offer that service. I imagine that the folks commissioning it may have put the cherry on the berry by ordering the Trump-classy Scabal diamond-dust, lapis lazuli-pinstripe, or gold fabric. They might as well line the damn thing with dollar bills rather than canvas.
post #21 of 42
The Kiton ensemble did look gorgeous though, and the Huntsman odd jacket looked kind of cool in an eccentric-Englishman-fox-hunting-at-his manor kind of way.
post #22 of 42
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I can live with having the breast pocket's corner slightly covered.
Not to defend the Lianna Lee suit, but you don't like that detail? I prefer the breast pocket to be short, high, slightly angled and/or curved, and partially tucked under the lapel. The longer, lower, straighter and closer to the shoulder seam it is, the more I hate it.
post #23 of 42
Oh, and that pic of Jay Kos is not a good advertisement for Castangia. Their suits can look a whole lot better than that.
post #24 of 42
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I prefer the breast pocket to be short, high, slightly angled and/or curved, and partially tucked under the lapel.
Yes, I do too.
post #25 of 42
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(1Dgaf @ 06 Nov. 2004, 4:33) Is having the same material and colour frowned on, instead of 'toning' them?  Or does it really not matter at all?
It's better to have the materials "clash": linen or wool sqaure with silk ties; silk squares with linen or wool (or cashmere) ties.  This is not iron-clad, however. Squares that precisely match the color and/or pattern of the tie look bad; sort of like you lack imagination.  Plain white linen almost always works.  Or the square can reflect the color of the shirt.  Or, if the square has a lot of colors, it can accent (without matching) one or more of the colors of the tie.
Thanks for the info.
post #26 of 42
I think it's funny that we here regularly buy the same brand of suits they mention for nothing close to absurd retail price... I've always said, and I truly believe, that whether I was rich or not would have no bearing on my insistence of getting a deal.
post #27 of 42
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What in the hell would anyone do with 50-60 new suits a year?
Assume you've got several homes, and you have six new suits made each year, but you need 10 copies of each one so that you have a complete wardrobe in each location. Voila. 60 suits.
post #28 of 42
Been having login problems. The windowpane is a sports jacket, hence the buttons. It's an old coat of mine that I've only worn about 6 or 7 times. I find it too loud, even for my normally over-the-top taste. I probably haven't put it on my back for over 4 years as I haven;t altered it after losing 20 pounds. But it photographs well. I emailed as you suggested, Manton, about two weeks ago, but jave not received a reply.
post #29 of 42
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(Leo Jay @ 06 Nov. 2004, 09:45) What in the hell would anyone do with 50-60 new suits a year?
Assume you've got several homes, and you have six new suits made each year, but you need 10 copies of each one so that you have a complete wardrobe in each location.  Voila.  60 suits.  
Duh. Of course. Silly me. I'm SO plebeian about such things...
post #30 of 42
How ridiculous. I just have to laugh at the emergence of Huntsman and A&S as the bargain alternatives. But I do applaud their reluctance/refusal (along with Mr. Logsdail) to work in the superfine fabrics that are now the rage. I have a Zegna 15milmil suit that is just the most disappointing thing, esp. when set next to a H. Poole suit in traditional English worsted. The Zegna doesn't hang properly and will never get a chance to grow up. Over the weekend I found an old Huntsman tweed jacket from 1959. Soft and frayed a bit here and there, it shows its age in the best timeless way and seems ready for at least another decade. 45 years from now, I'm afraid the Zegna will be 40 years past its prime as a very nice collection of shoe-buffing rags.
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