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tucking in dress shirts - Page 3

post #31 of 63
Sometimes having a little more fabric is useful, depending on whether you are just sitting at a computer all day and not moving your arms, or if you have to be more active.

I teach, so I'm in a tough spot with respect to shirts. If they are too tight, too short, etc. then when I raise my arm to write on a chalk board, the shirt can pull out too much. If there is too much fabric, then when I turn my back to the class they will see all this excess material.

So like someone was just saying, having a bit of extra material to allow you to move is OK. The guy in the first picture cannot raise his arms and maintain that fit. Plus the shirt looks painted on.

Don't forget that you can adjust your "tuck" periodically during the day as it will adjust regardless of how the shirt fits. I still think a slightly loose shirt tucked in looks better than these longer shirts worn untucked.
post #32 of 63
BB non-iron slim fit OCBD dress shirts help me with the fit issue for work. However, I'm confused because in their casual line, the slim fit shirts are too tight on me. I'm guessing they have different dimensions for work and play. Anyone else encounter this?
post #33 of 63
Quote:
I'd go even further and say that the people with skin-tight shirts in magazines look awful once you realize how shirt are supposed to fit. Some looseness, without bunching, allows the fabric to drape really nicely.
Well, actually I'm not a fan of tight-o-matic shirts either, but I think that this belongs to the many questions where it depends on everyones personal taste if it's supposed to be as fitted as possible or rather shaped.
post #34 of 63
HEllo,
I dont agree with you Tight shirt is good looking for man not loss i have alot Tight shirt body fitting man looking amazing Trust me
post #35 of 63
Socks up, shirts down.
post #36 of 63
^^ How many people use shirt stays??? they dont look compfortable at all, but if they work well....
post #37 of 63
I used to use shirt stays with my USAF uniform on certain occasions for that extra sharp look. They become very uncomfortable after several hours of wear, but not unbearable. I have not worn them since discharging, nor do I plan to.
post #38 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by dboll View Post
I used to use shirt stays with my USAF uniform on certain occasions for that extra sharp look. They become very uncomfortable after several hours of wear, but not unbearable. I have not worn them since discharging, nor do I plan to.

What did you do with those shirt stays to cause discharging? And why have you not used them since; can they not be washed?
post #39 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldog/oldtrix View Post
What did you do with those shirt stays to cause discharging? And why have you not used them since; can they not be washed?

post #40 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I wonder how much of this tucking-in problem stems from people's expectations of how a shirt should look. These magazine and catalogue photos really warp notions of what makes a proper fit. Do you expect your shirt to be completely flush to your body in front? I tuck in my shirt so that the excess fabric is more or less equally distributed, with slightly more in back.


+1
post #41 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by finch View Post
Exactly, my body would fit fine into a 15-15.5 shirt, I have a large Adams Apple which usually require me to purchase a 16 collar, in return I end up with added fabric in the body. A competent tailor can take in a dress shirt for you.

I have the same problem... the body of a 15.5 shirt fits me perfectly but the collar is always too tight. I have to buy 16 size shirts and have them tailor fitting very close by my seamst. lady.
post #42 of 63
Shirts that snap between the legs. /thread.
post #43 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by pauliodotnet View Post
darts?

i have had all my shirts tailored at 15 a shirt, and the lady is solid, but there is still excess that folds over.

and explain these darts :P

Darts are two vertical seams in the back of a shirt usually were your kidneys are located. Thet are usually on either side of your spine. They do the opposite of pleats. Darts are more common in women shirts than men. To find darted men shirts go to Hawes and Curtis and check their Brandon and Stirling shirts. I own seven of them and they have the darts on them.
post #44 of 63
tuck into your underwear son.
post #45 of 63
Military tuck as described earlier in this thread works really well. There are a ton of vidoes online that show how to do this ... I learnt this when I was in boy scouts back in school and have been following it ever since. Here is a sample video: http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fu...ideoID=1313494 Kent-wang like body hugging fit is NOT a solution to this problem. Dress shirts are supposed to be a bit baggy (but not tent-like) so that you can wear them comfortably all day long. On a related note, I also like the military tuck for my ties. I do this once in a while and it always draws compliments. I love this look with a OCBD and a repp tie. Like the guy on the right extreme here: Do any of you here like this too?
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