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Tailoring Pants - Taking in vs. Letting Out - Page 4

post #46 of 50

This is a MUST bump thread. The information on Styleforum has been extremely valuable, literally, when altering clothing, but I think someone needs to explicitly say "don't do it" pertaining to this topic.

 

"Taking in vs Letting out" pants, especially anything non wool, such as cotton for example, should never be "let-out" in the waist under any circumstances. I'll save everyone the money and say, don't do it, despite the recommendation of a few on here, that it's ok. It's not. 

 

I just had a $300 + pair of khaki cotton trousers, brand new, with tags (Loro Piana/Zegna) waist taken out about 1 inch. A fairly standard refitting. As many on here suggest -- go for the better seat and leg fit, I did just that. I'm blown away by the damage left from just a little adjustment. There are noticeable white lines (in the form of a V) up the seat to the waist and deep white marks where the waist was let out. The tailor told me that this happens with ALL cotton, really anything, but wool and even then, it's not always perfect. Its crazy that a manufacturer -- especially one of such high quality would not dye the pants then stitch or whatever they do. Why include 2 inches of extra fabric in the seat if it's entirely unusable? Bizarre. My tailor (a good one here in NYC) even told me not to do it. It was my choice and not a result of the tailors work. I wanted to see for myself. I wasn't 100% sure that it wouldn't work based on what I read on the internet.

 

If you come across this and it pertains to the "waist," always go the size up (or the right size) and let the tailor take in the waist an inch, seat and slim down the leg. Tailor says this is the only way to go! I've done it before with great results. I had never let the waist out of a pair of pants. This time I tried to save a little money getting what I thought was a better fit and less tailoring and it's going to wind up costing me 3 times what I originally wanted to spend. Clothes are fickle and nothing like buying a TV. Lesson learned. Fortunately the pants were marked down and the tailor was reasonable with cost. 

post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by super1flavor View Post Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
 

This is a MUST bump thread. The information on Styleforum has been extremely valuable, literally, when altering clothing, but I think someone needs to explicitly say "don't do it" pertaining to this topic.

 

"Taking in vs Letting out" pants, especially anything non wool, such as cotton for example, should never be "let-out" in the waist under any circumstances. I'll save everyone the money and say, don't do it, despite the recommendation of a few on here, that it's ok. It's not. 

 

I just had a $300 + pair of khaki cotton trousers, brand new, with tags (Loro Piana/Zegna) waist taken out about 1 inch. A fairly standard refitting. As many on here suggest -- go for the better seat and leg fit, I did just that. I'm blown away by the damage left from just a little adjustment. There are noticeable white lines (in the form of a V) up the seat to the waist and deep white marks where the waist was let out. The tailor told me that this happens with ALL cotton, really anything, but wool and even then, it's not always perfect. Its crazy that a manufacturer -- especially one of such high quality would not dye the pants then stitch or whatever they do. Why include 2 inches of extra fabric in the seat if it's entirely unusable? Bizarre. My tailor (a good one here in NYC) even told me not to do it. It was my choice and not a result of the tailors work. I wanted to see for myself. I wasn't 100% sure that it wouldn't work based on what I read on the internet.

 

If you come across this and it pertains to the "waist," always go the size up (or the right size) and let the tailor take in the waist an inch, seat and slim down the leg. Tailor says this is the only way to go! I've done it before with great results. I had never let the waist out of a pair of pants. This time I tried to save a little money getting what I thought was a better fit and less tailoring and it's going to wind up costing me 3 times what I originally wanted to spend. Clothes are fickle and nothing like buying a TV. Lesson learned. Fortunately the pants were marked down and the tailor was reasonable with cost. 

 

 

I disagree with wording such as "under any circumstances". This won't always be the outcome. When letting out, one will expose the old seam, hence the V shape. It's always there, but depending on the cloth, age, color, etc. the apparent visibility differs. I just let out a cheap pair of light gray cotton j.crew pants and after a quick pressing on the old seam it's barely visible.

 

Is it something to be concerned with? Yes. Something to always avoid? No.

post #48 of 50

Thanks, for the response. I'm going to respectfully disagree with you despite your positive result. My post was mainly intended to dissuade others from spending $250-$350 on a pair of "cotton" pants with the intent to "let-out" and being disappointed. Its funny, because the tailor actually said as much also, that I probably would have had better luck if it were the $19.00 gap khakis, which are similar to the JCrew's you probably have. 

 

I agree, it's absolutely something to be concerned with. I have a rotation of 5 pairs of trousers and I want the best kind of each and to be tailored perfectly. It would be ridiculous to walk into a summer meeting with very noticeable marks up my ass crack (sorry for the bluntness), on a pair of $300 pants. There are two areas of my body I never want to attract extra attention too in a professional setting and that's my crotch and ass. To each it their own. I read a few discussions on Ask Andy today about this and the only people brave enough to try it and also subsequently fail, were a few fella's wearing Bill's khaki's. 

 

I'm trying provide advice for future readers who like me, were on the fence. If the pants are expensive; don't do it. If they were $20 bucks, sure why not, I guess..

post #49 of 50
`````If we are talking "only" about the action of fitting a garment, then `letting out is right.

If we are talking "only" about the fabric, its a different story.

Cotton or synthetic fabrics are more likely to have the mentioned problems.
Wools are less likely to have those problems. Except for very hard finished wools like gaberdines.

Other conditions add to the question.here are some.
To get an un breakable seat seam, too heavy a thread with too large needle was used.
Or the needle was too worn out and tip blunted, or the needle had a burr on it.
A new needle should be used every day, but even that is no guarantee.
post #50 of 50

I just received a pair of Incotex pants in their "chinolino" cotton/linen blend fabric. I love the material, and fit in the thighs. The problems are that the waist is a little snug, and the seat is very snug. How generously can the seat be let out? Also, judging from previous posts in this thread, I worry I'm going to run into the problem of visible stitch lines in the material after tailoring.

 

I'm very inexperienced with having my clothes tailored, but I suspect that the combo of issues with these pants makes for a deal-breaker. Does the collective wisdom of SF concur? Many thanks in advance!

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