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Austro-Hungarian school of shoemaking - Page 65

post #961 of 1290
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

and different, sure a piece of art.

you're welcome happy.gif
post #962 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

and different, sure a piece of art.

what can I say?, +1
post #963 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

it's my pleasure and i enjoy... ...they made quite a journey until your place.
first of all i want to thank the regulars who fill this thread with life. much appreciated.
understood that's rather late in this part of the world. i happily fill in the blanks tomorrow.
ad hoc:
i'm shocked that one knob is damaged. i have to appologize for that. i overlooked it.
from the pictures, the middle part is insert in the wrong direction.
you did a fantastic job with the pictures. many thanks
talk later... nod[1].gif

Yes. Sorry about that - I can see it now. Was focused on capturing the shoes. I think everyone understands the details. smile.gif

nod[1].gif
post #964 of 1290
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burton View Post

Yes. Sorry about that - I can see it now. Was focused on capturing the shoes. I think everyone understands the details. smile.gif
nod[1].gif

it's about the correct tension, har har. you did a great job, thanks again.

btw, i was wondering where the damaged knob is. now, i know, zoing.

husch, husch to sleep. happy.gif
post #965 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burton View Post

233
233

I have never seen a topy with a flush steel cap,also it seems pretty thick kind of interesting..
post #966 of 1290
Thread Starter 
in the vass thread arised a question about arch support.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

how?

i find it more appropriate to answer it here and i'm admittedly a big fan of it.

i'll only explain my rather primitive diy-version which suffices for myself. non OCD.

basically it's nothing else than an insole which is adapted to my needs.

in my case i use the full sockliner, which is mandatory in all of my shoes.

i glue the sockliner on a thin layer of cork, which is purposedly used for flooring. i buy it in a diy-store.

then i cut a pattern for the arch support and put/glue it in place. been there, done that, works.

the pattern can also be from a piece of leather. i've done that too. makes no difference, imo.

it's no rocket science.
post #967 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

have been too tired yesterday to comment on them. you have an admirable collection. enjoy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

no doubt...

Thank you
Edited by rikod - 6/6/12 at 7:22pm
post #968 of 1290
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

I have never seen a topy with a flush steel cap,also it seems pretty thick kind of interesting..

over all the excitement, we should stick with the facts, imo.

tbh, this is not the most elegant version of a rubber sole and the toe taps are not flushed. this is an optical illusion due to the rough surface.

nonetheless, this shoe represents seventy years of knowledge and skills from a dedicated shoemaker.

this pair is one of the two rotating pairs from my cause "operation paprika" stateside as try on pairs. you can compare it to the "tie swap box", if you will.

the reason behind is - a pair of shoes, a single piece, which is made for another person to his personal specifications needs a bit more explanation than from a rtw serial production, imo. however it is not impossible to find the right foot for them. this is not a beginners task from both sides. mine and the interested party. it requires a portion of trust and flexibility.

the procedure is quite simple, i kick it off to an interested party and when it is a match, we close the deal.

i may ask all interested parties not to abuse the forum rules as this is not a B&S thread. all inquiries can be announced in the faq thread and i'll get back to you. thank you for your understanding.

this particular pair went to philly and made an appearance at lufty's law office. it went to the wine-consulting business of slewfoot and now hit the suburbs of chicago at burton's home.

it's an EU 43.5/44, wood pegged construction with rubber sole. stacked heel with a topy. the last is comparable to the F-last in a narrow width.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burton View Post

Like many of you here, I enjoy reading the posts from our lively and passionate colleague fritzl, a serious devotee of the AH school of shoe making. As such fritzl, or Gerd, and I have been exchanging PMs about shoe construction and the different styles of manufacture. Gerd informed me that another SF participant, Slewfoot, had a pair of the famed Paprika. Slewfoot was kind enough to agree to forward the shoe to me and I thought it would be good to photo document these in this thread.

Gerd can fill in the blanks and help tell their story.

burton, i'm afraid this is impossible.

i will try to give an overview to my approach to the whole shoe topic. we're talking abot a time span of seventeen years and it's a very personal story.

certainly, i will share anecdotes and stories as i promised. this is on of the purposes of this thread. a place to exchange knowledge and experiences around all things regarding shoes, especially of Austrian-Hungarian origin, and in general. i want to keep it open with a specific focus to AH.

also, i don't see it as my thread. it's a playground for interested people with a friendly atmosphere.

to be continued...
post #969 of 1290
Thread Starter 
the second pair is waiting in San Francisco with fellow member Urban Composition.

244.jpg

that's what he told me.

The shoes are solid, that's for sure - seemingly impenetrable to physical elements. The heel is very snug, which is awesome - it hugs the ball of my foot almost like a second sock, and yet strangely enough it's not tight at all. Just perfect. The toe box feels roomy but flat - my toes splay out comfortably, but since there is no extraneous overhead, they lay flat when walking (at least on carpet, for 30 seconds). The arch is just right - enough for pleasant support, but not too much as to be noticeably harsh.

A perfect shoe, for a size US 9.5 or 10. Too big for me, but perfect for a longer foot smile.gif


make up your own mind, please.
post #970 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

in the vass thread arised a question about arch support.
i find it more appropriate to answer it here and i'm admittedly a big fan of it.
i'll only explain my rather primitive diy-version which suffices for myself. non OCD.
basically it's nothing else than an insole which is adapted to my needs.
in my case i use the full sockliner, which is mandatory in all of my shoes.
i glue the sockliner on a thin layer of cork, which is purposedly used for flooring. i buy it in a diy-store.
then i cut a pattern for the arch support and put/glue it in place. been there, done that, works.
the pattern can also be from a piece of leather. i've done that too. makes no difference, imo.
it's no rocket science.

Thank you, sockliner = thin insole ?
Edited by sstomcat - 6/4/12 at 8:30am
post #971 of 1290
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

Thanks for the explanation,

you're welcome.
post #972 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

over all the excitement, we should stick with the facts, imo..

Very interesting read and thank you for taking the time to post...

Back to the shoe and pardon my ignorance as where it applies.

Does wood pecked shoe need a frame? I'm assuming the pegs go through the out sole passing the top leather and into the insole. On the shoe I do see some wheeling on the sole, but cant make out if they are instead stitching.
The stitching/broqueing is indeed different w.r.to the width in b/w the lines, the back counter meets the lacing counter (something that I shamelessly copied for my Vass tbh.....)

Keep it coming...
post #973 of 1290
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

Very interesting read and thank you for taking the time to post...
Back to the shoe and pardon my ignorance as where it applies.
Does wood pecked shoe need a frame? I'm assuming the pegs go through the out sole passing the top leather and into the insole. On the shoe I do see some wheeling on the sole, but cant make out if they are instead stitching.
The stitching/broqueing is indeed different w.r.to the width in b/w the lines, the back counter meets the lacing counter (something that I shamelessly copied for my Vass tbh.....)
Keep it coming...

every (dress)shoe needs a frame. otherwise it would fall apart.

wheeling is a decorative thing, nothing constructional.

lasted

kb5.jpg

bottom works

kb1.jpg

at the bench

kb7.jpg

a decent man

kissbacsi3.jpg
post #974 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

every (dress)shoe needs a frame. otherwise it would fall apart.

So, what is the purpose of the wood peck assuming the frame is stitched to the sole?
post #975 of 1290
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

So, what is the purpose of the wood peck assuming the frame is stitched to the sole?

i'm not sure i understand this question.
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