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Austro-Hungarian school of shoemaking - Page 77

post #1141 of 1304
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

thank you for your kind words. much appreciated.
let's give another shout out to our friend rikod. he got them from his wife for his fiftieth birthday. it cannot get better, imo. I discovered them three years ago and I was wondering, who'll get them. when rikod told me about this special present, i tried to make it happen. it worked. what a great story.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ncdobson View Post

That is indeed a great story.

Thanks!, and thank you so much again Fritzl, my wife doesn't even like brogue shoes but she really love that pair, very unique and special indeed. Not only they are beautiful and fit great, but your efforts and the whole story of the pair add a great sentimental value.

One thing I didn't mention in my PM's is how perfect the trees fit, much snug and secure than the Vass I own.

Cheers
post #1142 of 1304
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rikod View Post

Thanks!, and thank you so much again Fritzl, Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
my wife doesn't even like brogue shoes but she really love that pair, very unique and special indeed. Not only they are beautiful and fit great, but your efforts and the whole story of the pair add a great sentimental value.
One thing I didn't mention in my PM's is how perfect the trees fit, much snug and secure than the Vass I own.
Cheers

it's an easy formula. life consists of give and take. your guys support is pushing me in my efforts.

tbh, I never realized that your wife isn't fond of brogueing. I almost ignored it, because I wanted you this special piece. It's a mixture of knowledge, gut feeling and the attempt to get into the buyer's perspective. actually, this doesn't grow on the curbside.

Part of my idea of a good fit and the fit of the trees is the special insole which simultanously translates my philosophy of comfort and well being. It's a development which never stands still.

cheers
post #1143 of 1304
Thread Starter 
a scotch for mister dobson, cheers

petkovscotch.jpg

picture from petkov.at don't miss the gallery happy.gif
post #1144 of 1304

Fantastisch! Vielen Dank.

post #1145 of 1304
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncdobson View Post

Fantastisch! Vielen Dank.

gern geschehen
post #1146 of 1304
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

a scotch for mister dobson, cheers
picture from petkov.at don't miss the gallery happy.gif

Some unique things there!
post #1147 of 1304
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewfoot View Post

Some unique things there!

look at his clientele and you're there.
post #1148 of 1304
Thread Starter 
my cobbler does such a nice goyserer welt. not mine

haferl1.jpg

haferl.jpg

style: Haferlschuh, part of our national costume.
post #1149 of 1304
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewfoot View Post

Some unique things there!

that's part of the charme going the bespoke route.
post #1150 of 1304
Thread Starter 
"city" version

shoe1_2.jpg
post #1151 of 1304
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

"city" version
shoe1_2.jpg

 

Is it only the color that distinguishes the "city" from the "country" ("mountain"?) version?

post #1152 of 1304
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

"city" version
shoe1_2.jpg

Super nice
post #1153 of 1304
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

my cobbler does such a nice goyserer welt. not mine Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
haferl1.jpg
haferl.jpg
style: Haferlschuh, part of our national costume.

Does anyone have any videos of how a goyserer welt is made?

I assume that it's like Bentivegna in that the welt is stitched on the outside, one stitch going through to the insole, the other to the outsole. The difference being that the goyserer stitch spacing is aligned to be alternating between each row. Is this correct?

That is one of the neatest goyserer i've seen.
Edited by hendrix - 8/30/12 at 12:09am
post #1154 of 1304
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Does anyone have any videos of how a goyserer welt is made?
I assume that it's like Bentivegna in that the welt is stitched on the outside, one stitch going through to the insole, the other to the outsole. The difference being that the goysere stitches' spacing is aligned to be alternating between each row. Is this correct?
That is one of the neatest goyserer i've seen.

it is. he is a very talented guy in his early twenties, who inherited the workshop from his grandfather whom I unfortunately never met. R.I.P.
you see the coincidence?

well, the goyserer is well described in the VASS book under the other term "zwiegenäht", chapter starts at p. 157.
post #1155 of 1304
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncdobson View Post

Is it only the color that distinguishes the "city" from the "country" ("mountain"?) version?

nowadays, both are city versions. no one really uses them as a work shoe anymore. you wear it e.g. on church holidays with your best national costume.

the difference is the welt. the "goyserer" or "zwiegenäht" is a double welt, while on the burgundy pair it's a single contrast stitching with bigger gaps between the stitches. you don't see the second version very often, though. it's clearly a bespoke feature.
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