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How long can really wear MTM or bespoke? - Page 2

post #16 of 21
My opinion: 1) Longevity is unrelated to whether a garment is made bespoke, MTM, or RTW. 2) Do not clean wool garments if you can avoid it 3) The only garment of my father's that ever wore out of which I am aware, is a cashmere coat that I happily wear. Wearing out to my father was getting shiny at the lapels, but I think it is fine. 4) If a garment is made from wool and you do not clean it and you are rotating it, it should last forever (meaning your tastes will change before you have to dispose of it, or you will die) assuming you have a desk job. 5) I discussed my views with Centofanti, and assuming no super-modern or luxurious fabrics (nothing above 120's and nothing but lambswool), he agrees. According to Centofanti, cashmere finish should not reduce the longevity of a garment either, which is why I am such a fan of these fabrics. 6) The above discussion presupposes that you do not have a moth problem, you hang your clothes after wearing them, and you have a sufficiently large wardrobe you can avoid wearing any garment more than once/week in its season. Rules promulgated for shirts appear to be wildly off, based on posts here (I do not have so much experience with shirts and my father never wears particularly nice shirts, so I never notice how long he keeps them). After initial trepidation, I think my shirts will last a long time. But the more delicate (and inexpensive) shirts I had made locally by that small bespoke shirtmaker, look allready like they will have a measurable lifespan. So this is also contingent on fabric.
post #17 of 21
I don't quite understand the references to wearing the suits in rotation "in their season." What the heck does this mean? If I wear a year-round weight suit in the winter, will it wear out faster for that reason alone? (In other words, does a winter day take more toll on a year-round weight worsted wool suit than a spring day does? Or is the meaning that if you only wear a suit once a weak "in season" you will only wear it about 25 times a year?). I have no flannel suits, which is why I ask this question.
post #18 of 21
So called "year-round" suits are usually good for only 3 seasons. Call me in 20 years to find out if my one 3 season suit lasts as long as the 2 season ones. My point was, and of course this is only my opinion, that there really is no limit on how long a wool suit should last. I feel the same way about leather shoes (soles excepted). I imagine there must be people who are hard on their suits, but if they are wearing suits out in a matter of years I wonder if there are not habits they are in that severely reduce the life of the suit, or they are selecting particularly fragile fabrics.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
I don't quite understand the references to wearing the suits in rotation "in their season."  What the heck does this mean?  If I wear a year-round weight suit in the winter, will it wear out faster for that reason alone?  (In other words, does a winter day take more toll on a year-round weight worsted wool suit than a spring day does?  Or is the meaning that if you only wear a suit once a weak "in season" you will only wear it about 25 times a year?).
I suppose a lot depends on an individual's reaction to temperature.  I find warm weather uncomfortable and hot weather intolerable.  I try to wear only the lightest possible fabrics and weaves in summer, unlined if possible. Things like fresco and mohair and cotton and linen. Even dupioni silk, which I love, is too hot for the very warmest days. Also, I find that in dark colors, even the lightest weight cloths are hot because they soak up the sun's rays.  So I tend to order in the lightest possible colors.  All in all, these suits are just not appropriate for cooler seasons.  So I resolved a long time ago to order different suits for different seasons. This has several advantages. There is comfort. There is the fact that I am not forced to wear dark worsteds all the time. And, because my suits essentially get half the year off, they last longer. Some tailors have told me that heat and humidity do take their toll on suits, and that the lighter the cloth, the more of a beating a suit will take.  I have certainly found it true that lightweight cloths wear out faster.  I don't know that I've noticed the weather having any real effect, however.
post #20 of 21
To Johnnynorman3: Before the advent of the so-called "all year suit" men had seasonal wardrobes. This was necessary before the wide spread use of air conditioning and central heating and commuting by car. Men had seasonal wardrobes as a matter of both fashion and function. As far as function is concerned, you can freeze to death waiting on a platform for the Long Island Rail Road on a January morning. Men would have have heavy suits for the cold months. If you want to freeze waiting for the 7:10, then wear an all year suit. If you want to prevent frostbite and colds, wear a heavier suit. Also, the winter/fall colors tended to be dark. I have some very heavy suits which you can only buy MTM or bespoke. I'm having Oxxford make-up one in 19 ounce wool. That's very heavy, and you cannot wear it the summer (unless you work in the meat freezer in the A & P). Northeasterners tend to have seasonal wardrobes due to the extremes in temperatures. For the summer I have some very light suits which are light in color and weight. I have cotton suits and a silk suit. I also have suits suitable for the fall and spring days. These are so-called mid-weight suits. Therefore, if you are a traditionalist you would have seasonal clothes. The most wearings that I can get out of some suits is 20 times a year. The lessened frequency of wear adds to the suit's life.
post #21 of 21
To SOB, I would go seasonal if I had an unlimited amount of money. But as it stands I'm not going to deprive myself of a year-round or 3 season suit just to get a thick flannel one. That's just not smart considering I may not be in the NE for more than 2 more years. And I refuse to split the difference by buying mid-range or low-range suits, which would allow me to have twice the suits for the same amount of money. Perhaps I'll get one flannel suit and wear it 2 or 3 times a week, but that will be my limit to heavy suits. If I have 8 suits in my closet, 5 better be year round.
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