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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 531

post #7951 of 11486
Eh, I don't necessarily agree, I know people here fetishize 20+oz fabrics but I've never had an issue with any fabric in the 10-12oz range. Yes, if you need to be perfectly creased every second of the day, a 11/12 oz flannel is not going to do that for you but I don't dress for perfection, I dress for comfort (and I run hot) and I don't like my clothes to look like I am wearing my "sunday best".
post #7952 of 11486
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

Eh, I don't necessarily agree, I know people here fetishize 20+oz fabrics but I've never had an issue with any fabric in the 10-12oz range. Yes, if you need to be perfectly creased every second of the day, a 11/12 oz flannel is not going to do that for you but I don't dress for perfection, I dress for comfort (and I run hot) and I don't like my clothes to look like I am wearing my "sunday best".

i agree with you about dressing for comfort..... in those weights of 10-12oz, how does do your creases tend to fall out? do they require frequent pressing or with sufficient rest they just disappear?

post #7953 of 11486
I'm with the heavy flannels camp here - I have 3 suits from 11oz flannels (2 Fox, 1 Drapers), and I wish I had gone heavier - they pill easily, don't hold a crease for very long, and need to be ironed quite frequently.
post #7954 of 11486
FWIW, the guys at Andersons contend that the quality of Breanish tweed has dropped markedly since they became much more commercial.
post #7955 of 11486
Quote:
Originally Posted by naviC View Post

i agree with you about dressing for comfort..... in those weights of 10-12oz, how does do your creases tend to fall out? do they require frequent pressing or with sufficient rest they just disappear?

I think the issue some people have with a lighterweight flannel is that it does not hold creases, it wears a bit like a sweatsuit. To me, that is not a fault but rather a charming characteristic. Wrinkles don't bother me, if you look at people like the Duke, Luciano Barbera etc, when they wear flannel, it looks like stuff that they've really worn, I don't know what weight their stuff is but I wear flannel like I wear linen, the wrinkles, bagging etc are part of the charm of the fabric, not something I actively try to avoid.
post #7956 of 11486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace Tilley View Post

I'm with the heavy flannels camp here - I have 3 suits from 11oz flannels (2 Fox, 1 Drapers), and I wish I had gone heavier - they pill easily, don't hold a crease for very long, and need to be ironed quite frequently.

Pilling does not have to do with the weight.
post #7957 of 11486
^ John Kent and Malcolm Plews would both disagree with you on that.
post #7958 of 11486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace Tilley View Post

FWIW, the guys at Andersons contend that the quality of Breanish tweed has dropped markedly since they became much more commercial.
I.e., since A&S lost their exclusive. crackup[1].gif
post #7959 of 11486
Maybe so, but I'm not entirely inclined to believe that's the reason. For one, Andersons never had an exclusive (I bought a Breanish from W&J back in 2007/08). Furthermore, in the same breath, they mentioned how much they liked Cacciopoli, but were unable to get their fabrics for the shop.
post #7960 of 11486
I remember that Raph never liked Breanish either - he said it was like a jersey fabric, and unsuitable for custom clothing. Ditto Despos.

Maybe Breanish is just one of those famous-on-the-interwebs thingys.
post #7961 of 11486
Btw, anyone know what's up with the Butt of Lewis shop? They've been closed for quite a few months now.
post #7962 of 11486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post

I remember that Raph never liked Breanish either - he said it was like a jersey fabric, and unsuitable for custom clothing. Ditto Despos.

Maybe Breanish is just one of those famous-on-the-interwebs thingys.

+1. I was told that it is a nightmare to tailor since it stretches so easily. Was also told the same thing about some of the spongier LL cloths (the brown houndstooth being a good example).
post #7963 of 11486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post

I remember that Raph never liked Breanish either - he said it was like a jersey fabric, and unsuitable for custom clothing. Ditto Despos.

Maybe Breanish is just one of those famous-on-the-interwebs thingys.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post

+1. I was told that it is a nightmare to tailor since it stretches so easily. Was also told the same thing about some of the spongier LL cloths (the brown houndstooth being a good example).

The S-G of tweeds?
post #7964 of 11486
One English tailor I used refused to work with Breanish and sent back the two lengths I gave him. I had them made by another tailor and was told it was very difficult to work with - spongy and stretchy and hard to shape (and get to hold shape). That said, I love the two Breanish sport coats I have. They are the only tweed that do well in warmer weather and are super comfy. That said, it is not a crisp look.
I would love to get another, as in that big glen check, for example. I am concerned if people are reporting a drop in quality - the lengths I had were bought about five years ago and from old stock (the burgundy/brown, for example, is supposedly no longer makable because the EU banned the dye http://www.styleforum.net/t/53633/working-with-breanish-tweed/0_50#post_830667). I suppose I should find someone who carries the current runs to see if the quality seems the same.
post #7965 of 11486
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

 I am concerned if people are reporting a drop in quality - the lengths I had were bought about five years ago and from old stock (the burgundy/brown, for example, is supposedly no longer makable because the EU banned the dye http://www.styleforum.net/t/53633/working-with-breanish-tweed/0_50#post_830667). I suppose I should find someone who carries the current runs to see if the quality seems the same.

 

Jesus, what the hell is in the dye that they banned it?  If you have a clipping a dyehouse should be able to match it.

 

New liability from Marling & Evans:

 


Edited by mactire - 11/29/13 at 4:30am
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