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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 495

post #7411 of 11387
Quote:
Originally Posted by velomane View Post

What are you guys referring to? The long series of quotes?

Yes, annoying. He should at least put in a spoiler.
post #7412 of 11387

Do not be discouraged. Make a wiki.

post #7413 of 11387

Greetings Gents-

 

I am looking for a Prince of Wales with a purple under-stripe for a sport coat. Any guidance would be much appreciated. Ideally a light cashmere or cashmere blend however I would consider all options. Thanks in advance.

 

RCC

 

Edit:

 

I suppose a Glen Plaid would work as well.


Edited by Apollotrader - 9/28/13 at 11:26am
post #7414 of 11387

Does anyone know who produces/sources the kind of polyester material often used to make trench/rain coats? My tailor said he has never seen anything similar from the places who supply him suiting cloth. Is it a completely different industry? I would imagine pricing to be less expensive than natural fibers, but I am completely uneducated on the topic. I'm considering getting a black or a grey waterproof coat made for myself. Any wisdom or help is greatly appreciated.

post #7415 of 11387
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPhineasCole View Post
 

Does anyone know who produces/sources the kind of polyester material often used to make trench/rain coats? My tailor said he has never seen anything similar from the places who supply him suiting cloth. Is it a completely different industry? I would imagine pricing to be less expensive than natural fibers, but I am completely uneducated on the topic. I'm considering getting a black or a grey waterproof coat made for myself. Any wisdom or help is greatly appreciated.

 

 

I never got any 'technical' fabric myself, but I have bought Ventile to have a Mac made up, it's 100% cotton but waterproof: http://www.ventile.co.uk/

post #7416 of 11387
Quote:
Originally Posted by mactire View Post
 

 

 

I never got any 'technical' fabric myself, but I have bought Ventile to have a Mac made up, it's 100% cotton but waterproof: http://www.ventile.co.uk/

 

Me, too, but still searching for someone with double needle machines.

post #7417 of 11387

Thanks for the input thus far, gentlemen. That's a good point; I had better confirm that my tailor can work with the cloth before I make a purchase.

post #7418 of 11387

The ventile specification calls for a double felled seam for waterproofing the edges. Not challenging, but time-consuming and requiring the right equipment. Someone used to working on jeans would be better equipped than a handsewing tailor.

post #7419 of 11387
Have you handled Ventile before? Just my two cents, but I think a heavier, traditional gabardine - like the kind Burberry uses - or a rubberized fabric would look better than Ventile. Ventile is a bit too technical, I think, for your purposes (or what I imagine your purposes to be).
post #7420 of 11387

Ventile comes in numerous weights

post #7421 of 11387
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Have you handled Ventile before? Just my two cents, but I think a heavier, traditional gabardine - like the kind Burberry uses - or a rubberized fabric would look better than Ventile. Ventile is a bit too technical, I think, for your purposes (or what I imagine your purposes to be).

 

I have not handled it. My purposes are for something more on the traditional side, IE something I could wear over a suit, as opposed to something I could ski in.

 

PS - I am a big fan of Die, Workwear and check Put This On regularly. Thank you for your time and wisdom.

post #7422 of 11387

Is there a reason you are not opting for an off the rack raincoat? There are numerous options available if you are above a certain size. A raincoat need not fit like a tailored garment.

 

You can also get one in silk. I do not recommend a rubberized coat; they feel clammy. Heavy twill or gabardine raincoats can feel oppressive if you intend to ever wear it in spring. Cromby makes a RTW double-faced raincoat with no lining that is considerably lighter than the macs of yesteryear. Expensive, though. Incidentally, even Ventile is treated with resin, though its main draw is the quiet rustle and the "swelling" of fibers in rain.

 

If traditionalism is key you can get a heavy bonded Mackintosh (they feel like lead sheets) and wear it over your 20 ounce suit.

British raincoats are sweltering, stuffy affairs that linger on only because, like so many things, they have been reified. Already by the 1960s Italian raincoats made in swishy technical fabrics were deservedly usurping the share of the market from those rubber abominations.

 

By the way, I have seen books of this treated gabardine stuff at tailors before -- in tan, stone, etc. It is not so unusual. Can't recall who, but it was probably something through Gladson. Pay an exploratory visit to a different tailor and find the name of the book.

post #7423 of 11387
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPhineasCole View Post
 

 

I have not handled it. My purposes are for something more on the traditional side, IE something I could wear over a suit, as opposed to something I could ski in.

 

PS - I am a big fan of Die, Workwear and check Put This On regularly. Thank you for your time and wisdom.

 

There are different weights of it, I got the L24 type myself.  The main attraction for me was that it is supposed to be quieter and breathable.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post
 

Is there a reason you are not opting for an off the rack raincoat? There are numerous options available if you are above a certain size. A raincoat need not fit like a tailored garment.

 

You can also get one in silk. I do not recommend a rubberized coat; they feel clammy. Heavy twill or gabardine raincoats can feel oppressive if you intend to ever wear it in spring. Cromby makes a RTW double-faced raincoat with no lining that is considerably lighter than the macs of yesteryear. Expensive, though. Incidentally, even Ventile is treated with resin, though its main draw is the quiet rustle and the "swelling" of fibers in rain.

 

If traditionalism is key you can get a heavy bonded Mackintosh (they feel like lead sheets) and wear it over your 20 ounce suit.

British raincoats are sweltering, stuffy affairs that linger on only because, like so many things, they have been reified. Already by the 1960s Italian raincoats made in swishy technical fabrics were deservedly usurping the share of the market from those rubber abominations.

 

By the way, I have seen books of this treated gabardine stuff at tailors before -- in tan, stone, etc. It is not so unusual. Can't recall who, but it was probably something through Gladson. Pay an exploratory visit to a different tailor and find the name of the book.

 

As you mention waxed cottons and rubberised cloth can be very oppressive and sweaty in mild weather, particularly in Spring or on the commute.  What is this treated gabardine you mention, is it like the wool overcoatings that are teflon coated to repel rain?

post #7424 of 11387

Thank you for your continued consideration, Mr. Sprout and all.

 

I don't have a legitimate reason for "needing" a bespoke rain coat, not any more reason than I have for "needing" bespoke suits. I don't have freakish dimensions or anything of that nature. I just recently realized I might be interested in taking on the burden of learning/understanding/appreciating the process of creating such a garment and dealing with the frustration/satisfaction/disappointment/joy that comes with the experience of having something made to my own vision and specifications.

 

I have wandered over to other forums that focus on performance/camping/extreme outdoor gear and I've seen multiple discussions of the pros and cons of ventile and other natural fabrics vs more modern produced materials like Goretex and PVC. From my brief overview I get the impression, as you would imagine, that no fabric excels in all categories, and it comes down to personal preference and the real priorities of use. If I had to specify, I suppose my priority is more for aesthetics; I want it to drape/look/wear well, and I want it to be capable of being tailored. At a close second I would like it to keep me completely dry on an average commute. I don't plan on doing manual labor outside in pouring rain for hours, and I don't plan on wearing it for hiking/long outdoor excursions. Providing warmth is not really a concern of mine. Tearing is not really a big issue for me either; obviously I don't want it to be tissue-paper delicate, but again, I won't be rolling down mountains in it.

 

If I should go with Ventile and am able to source it, in my head I have an idea of using L24 as the outer layer and perhaps 1/2 or 1/4 lining it with a contrasting L34.

post #7425 of 11387

Treated gabardine, twill, and blends: I wasn't referring to anything special, just the main subject at issue. Viz, 99% of raincoats are treated with a resin for water-repellency. This includes Ventile, even though they don't advertise that. The material is bathed in a fluid that creates a chemical link with the textile and repels water. This is not the same as Mackintosh raincoats, where rubber is actually bonded with cotton. Very good if you need to go grouse hunting, but they certainly feel like what you would expect a rubber coat to. Burberry coats OTOH are (or were) not bad at all, but the lighter weights are better.

 

MrPC: That is fine. My reasons for pursuing this route are because off the peg coats are usually too big.

 

Ventile need not be self-lined, so you can line the finished coat with anything you like, such as a smart tartan. It won't affect breathability.

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