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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 487

post #7291 of 11137
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Thinking about getting another shirt jacket/ safari jacket made, something like this linen one I bought from Ascot Chang



I'd like to try out a tweed, but am considering this 18oz London Lounge Fox Flannel

For scale, here's the blue version
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Anyone have thoughts? I really like the pattern and color, but wonder if a woolen flannel for a shirt jacket might not be too strange. I can't find any other tweeds that are capturing my attention. Some of the stuff in P&H is OK, but I'd like to get a dark brown with a large windowpane.

Suggestions?

How about a Harrisons Moonbeam:

Quite a few dark + windowpane options but in a slightly more wearable (inside) weight.


I think one of these could work:

36679%20MBEA.jpg

36683%20MBEA.jpg

36688%20MBEA.jpg
post #7292 of 11137
The term shirt jacket is pretty loose. The strictest definition is a heavier garment that's cut like a shirt, but meant to be worn like a jacket. A broader definition is a jacket without any real structure (no padding, canvassing, quilting, etc).

There are some shirt jackets in this thread. There are also a bunch of photos of safari jackets on Ascot Changs blog, which have been collected here. I would count those as the same as shirt jackets.

Depending on the design, a field jacket is often a bit too rugged to wear with dress trousers. SC are sometimes a bit too dressy. I'm not a fan of cardigans worn by themselves, and in any case, they don't provide the same protection, warmth, and pocket space.
post #7293 of 11137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabrigian View Post

How about a Harrisons Moonbeam:

Quite a few dark + windowpane options but in a slightly more wearable (inside) weight.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I think one of these could work:

36679%20MBEA.jpg

36683%20MBEA.jpg

36688%20MBEA.jpg


Those are great, Canta, thanks. I esp like the first. As SKM said above, don't know if they'd be too light though? This thing is going to be cut without any structure inside, after all.
post #7294 of 11137
I'd be hesitant to go with Angora for something with such little internal structure. A Shetland or a Harris would be a better option.
post #7295 of 11137
That is a good point - might be a bit too soft, especially if you'll be really using the pockets.

How about some Glorious Twelfth - should hold up a bit better but drape considerably better than tweed tweed. I don't like the patterns quite as much but these could work--







If you don't share my aversion to pin-width windowpanes, there are obviously more options.
post #7296 of 11137
Glorious Twelfth is nice, but I think a bit too smooth and silky for what I'm going for. I liked Cleric's suggestion for a Shetland. I don't like Harris, but a heavy Shetland could be nice.
post #7297 of 11137
Just saw this - might save you the hassle of going bespoke

http://ethandesu.com/post/61383748288/the-teba-by-justo-gimeno-for-winter-a-style-that

post #7298 of 11137
I saw that too, and really like them. Still would like to get something made for myself.

The fabrics that jacket comes in look really nice.

post #7299 of 11137

^ Glad the Armoury aren't overlooking the Teba.

 

Most likely getting a Teba made come October using a different tailor (from Madrid). Not sure if I should play with the pockets (remove the flap) and add a center vent.

 

Debating wool/cashmere for winter or wool/linen for warmer weather. For me they make an ideal brunch or in-flight companion.


Edited by conradwu - 9/16/13 at 6:45pm
post #7300 of 11137
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

Shows what I know. I'll stick to drawing in my coloring books.


Does that mean Marling & Evans is still available, or have they spun off? From the look of their website it seems like they've decamped elsewhere and are offering white label textiles.

Don't know, but if they have spun off it would be worth contacting both M&E and R&T to see who got the inventory. There is a seller on ebay who is selling some nice M&E Saxony patterns under the R&T name, so maybe R&T is liquidating the stock. For 30£ a meter, I picked up a couple of patterns.

For example : http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/380687968480?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649
post #7301 of 11137

Gentlemen, I just received this bunch of heavy oxfords (160 gr.) that I'm having made up for autumn:

 

 

AppleMark

 

 

Normally I'd go for my standard casual style, which is (a substantial) button down and one breast pocket. However, I found myself wondering if a normal collar (i.e. regular size, no button down) would be appropriate? I guess it would look alright with a cashmere necktie, or something of the like, but would it be wearable without the necktie? Obviously the patterned ones wouldn't look too great with a tie, but maybe the solids...? Your thoughts are much appreciated!

 

BTW, they'll be made unfused.

post #7302 of 11137
A Neapolitan collar of the correct proportions can look very fine when unbuttoned under a sweater. It combines the softness of a button-down with some of the elegance of a straight collar.
post #7303 of 11137

I find it so puzzling how the general consensus in this thread seams to highly regard heavy cloths? Im confused as why there is such scepticism toward the super cloths? Is it simply because most people aren't using tailors who are skilled enough to use the cloth? Why would one use such a craftsmen?

post #7304 of 11137
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcbrgs View Post
 

I find it so puzzling how the general consensus in this thread seams to highly regard heavy cloths? Im confused as why there is such scepticism toward the super cloths? Is it simply because most people aren't using tailors who are skilled enough to use the cloth? Why would one use such a craftsmen?

 

http://www.jstor.org/stable/2138632


Edited by sprout2 - 9/17/13 at 4:47pm
post #7305 of 11137
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcbrgs View Post

I find it so puzzling how the general consensus in this thread seams to highly regard heavy cloths? Im confused as why there is such scepticism toward the super cloths? Is it simply because most people aren't using tailors who are skilled enough to use the cloth? Why would one use such a craftsmen?

I think that it's partly because of where quite a few people live, as there are quite a lot of folks from cooler climes on here, and it's also partly because high super numbers are often a bit over-hyped and not really all they're made out to be.

It's a bit like using horsepower/kW to sell a car - it might sound great, but there's a lot more that goes into making a good car than just power, such as build quality, interior furnishings, suspension and so on. Suits are similar - sure, a lightweight Super 150s cloth might sound great, but if the suit isn't well made, the Super number doesn't matter much at all.

Also, (in my experience, at least) high Super number cloth is typically more fragile, tends to wear more quickly as a result, doesn't hold a crease as well and crumples and wrinkles more, and the wrinkles don't fall out with hanging as easily as with a heavier or lower Super number cloth.

I've got a few suits from Japanese and Italian companies made from Super 160s cloth and, whilst they are nice and whilst they feel very light, I actually don't wear them much as I've come to appreciate the feel of something a little bit more substantial and a little bit less delicate.

Finally, in closing, it's worth noting that "heavy" doesn't necessarily equate to coarse, or to a low Super number. You can have a fine, supple cloth that has a lovely hand and which breathes very well but which weighs a little bit more than some other cloths. Often a bit of weight helps a jacket to hang nicely and to keep its shape.
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