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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 394

post #5896 of 11663
Thread Starter 
90% of the stuff marked "donegal" that I have seen looks like what I have posted above (in a variety of colors, though). And it's way thinner than harris. Harris pretty much only comes in very heavy weights, high teens and above, and is so scrachty it can sand off your skin. Donegal is more refined, though perhaps all the donegal I am familiar with is "faux donegal," I don't know.

I will say that in the old sources, AA and the like, "Donegal" is always represented as having that pattern, sort like birdseye, but with the dot more or less the size and shape of arboreo rice.
post #5897 of 11663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

90% of the stuff marked "donegal" that I have seen looks like what I have posted above (in a variety of colors, though). And it's way thinner than harris. Harris pretty much only comes in very heavy weights, high teens and above, and is so scrachty it can sand off your skin. Donegal is more refined, though perhaps all the donegal I am familiar with is "faux donegal," I don't know.

I will say that in the old sources, AA and the like, "Donegal" is always represented as having that pattern, sort like birdseye, but with the dot more or less the size and shape of arboreo rice.

Again, this all comes from a conflation of the original and generic terms. But if you look at the fabrics actually made by the Irish mills historically, they have always come in a variety of weights, weaves and patterns. So, in answer to your original question whether a Donegal can be a herringbone, the answer is yes and often is.
post #5898 of 11663
Like how all tissue is called "Kleenex" and yet Kleenex makes things other than tissue.
post #5899 of 11663
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Like how all tissue is called "Kleenex" and yet Kleenex makes things other than tissue.

and how we drive in the parkway but park in the driveway confused.gif
post #5900 of 11663
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Like how all tissue is called "Kleenex" and yet Kleenex makes things other than tissue.

And a lot of companies make tissues that we generically call Kleenex. Xerox is another example. Or for those who are old enough to remember, Frigidare.
post #5901 of 11663
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Can I get people's opinions on Oyster, Lesser, and Smith's navy hopsacks? I'm planning to order a BlazerSuit through Steed, and they sent me some swatches to consider.

My impression is that Lesser is really nice, but feels very smooth compared to the Oyster and Smith. Possibly better if this garment was only to be used as a suit. Oyster, on the other hand, has a much more visible weave, but I fear it might be too "rustic" for a true city suit. Smiths, to my eye, seems to be right in the middle. Good enough for a suit, but not so smooth that the fabric would look odd as a blazer, which is what I intend to wear this most as. Thus, I'm tempted then to use something like Smith's 3913, a 12/13oz wool.

Can anyone offer thoughts?

I'm looking for something similar. Is the Smith 3913 you're looking at from Botany?
post #5902 of 11663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

that is a fine summary. All three are excellent quailty. For use as a blazer, I would prefer the one with the most rusticity.

Thanks, Manton. The most rusticated one is Oyster, but I'm unsure if it's too rough for a proper city suit? At the the same time, I'm not sure if Smiths is too smooth for a sport coat. Any thoughts?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquidus View Post

I'm looking for something similar. Is the Smith 3913 you're looking at from Botany?

I'm actually not sure. I ask Steed if they could send me samples of the Steadfast, as I've read good things about it either here or on LL, so I assume it's from there. I emailed them last week to confirm, but haven't yet heard back.
post #5903 of 11663
Thread Starter 
I think any blue hopsack is fine for a city suit, I mean if we will wear flannel and fresco, then a rough hopsack is fine
post #5904 of 11663
Good point. Many thanks, Manton.
post #5905 of 11663
Quote:
Originally Posted by etkl View Post

And a lot of companies make tissues that we generically call Kleenex. Xerox is another example. Or for those who are old enough to remember, Frigidare.

Band-Aid is also a brand name. Mackintosh too (named after the inventor of the fabric used).
post #5906 of 11663
I have a suit made from Smith Botany 3912, same plain weave as 3913 (not hopsack) but one shade lighter, and I consider it to be very much a smooth business worsted. The navy hopsack from the Steadfast line, which I have in a blazer, is significantly more rustic and textured.
post #5907 of 11663
In the late 19th century, Donegal weavers went to Harris to learn how they had built The Harris Tweed, which had become so popular with the gentry on the mainland. Except for the speckles, which were a way to save on dyeing, Donegal tweed seems to follow the path of Harris Tweed in regard to patterns.
Edited by Gruto - 3/25/13 at 2:22pm
post #5908 of 11663
If one ounce lighter weight doesn't bother you, Fine Classics is a little less textured than the Oyster but more so than the Lessers.
post #5909 of 11663

Country shirting from Fisher:

 

post #5910 of 11663
^ nice. Anyone here familiar with Huddersfield shirtings? Please share your thoughts.

TIA
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