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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 381

post #5701 of 11062
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

Still awaiting pictures of the green fresco

Re: two pants, I never do this. Your taste is more likely to change before the pants wear out or, more likely, your desire to get a new suit for some subjective reason is likely to flare up before they wear out.

 

As mentioned above, it is a Rangoon and not a Fresco.

Pics will be posted when I get them.
post #5702 of 11062
Quote:
Originally Posted by bertie View Post


Wait - did you say subjective reason? I thought we (SF) had clearly established the scientific basis by which we select our clothes.


I think we established why we spontaneously desire new suits: vanity.

My vanity is far speedier than a pair of pants' rate of wearing out...

post #5703 of 11062
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post


I think we established why we spontaneously desire new suits: vanity My vanity is far speedier than a pair of pants' rate of wearing out......

That is a great line and holds a lot of truth (to be clear - in general and not referring to you specifically)
post #5704 of 11062
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

Re: two pants, I never do this. Your taste is more likely to change before the pants wear out or, more likely, your desire to get a new suit for some subjective reason is likely to flare up before they wear out.

That hasn't been my experience with certain woolens. Those can easily wear through after a few years. I'd like to make a suit last longer than that, even if I am to get a new suit.

Does linen wear through as easily, however? In the time that I've worn through a couple of flannels now, my linens are still going strong, but I also don't keep a tally on how frequently I wear either.
post #5705 of 11062
I have had cheap linen pants that lasted a long time. The only reason I tossed them was they simply lost all their shape and looked liked pajamas. It would be good to hear from others on their experience with the longevity of linen for suiting.
post #5706 of 11062

Not sure if you are getting some fancy linen, but the material is exceptionally hardy and will soften over time. Indeed, this is desirable and the point -- like jeans. Unless you are living in one linen suit, I don't think it should wear away like your flannels. If it's an exceptionally smooth, 'hard' linen, it may develop a sheen in spots (maybe), but I can't say I would give it a second thought when ordering a coat and pants. My point above is that you will find the process of buying clothing positively flies when you aren't constantly second-guessing yourself about things like this, or poring over swatch samples by lamplight, etc. It's not always necessary to kick the tires. At the very least you will sleep more soundly if you throw caution to the wind. But I know that checking everything in triplicate is the igent way.

post #5707 of 11062

By the way, I was just inspecting some thick linen sheets that are six years old and have been used and abused over that time, laundered, dried with heat, etc., etc., and they are free of any signs of wear, other than that they have developed a silken smoothness. I want a change of pace so I'll be cutting them up to serve as pillowcases and general purpose rags, etc, but they could go another 10 years (at least) if desired.

 

This is for fairly middle of the road linen, btw. I can't vouchsafe that if you are getting some silk blended super 1 millions linen it won't turn into dust.
 

post #5708 of 11062
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

Not sure if you are getting some fancy linen, but the material is exceptionally hardy and will soften over time. Indeed, this is desirable and the point -- like jeans. Unless you are living in one linen suit, I don't think it should wear away like your flannels. If it's an exceptionally smooth, 'hard' linen, it may develop a sheen in spots (maybe), but I can't say I would give it a second thought when ordering a coat and pants. My point above is that you will find the process of buying clothing positively flies when you aren't constantly second-guessing yourself about things like this, or poring over swatch samples by lamplight, etc. It's not always necessary to kick the tires. At the very least you will sleep more soundly if you throw caution to the wind. But I know that checking everything in triplicate is the igent way.

Well - sometimes budget considerations come into play, especially with commissioned clothing
post #5709 of 11062
Anyone have experience with Smith & Co STEADFAST? 14/15 oz
post #5710 of 11062
Thread Starter 
Never heard that name but I do have several pieces of Smith 15. Same stuff? Very tough worsted, comparable to Lesser 16, highly recommended.
post #5711 of 11062
Possibly - looks to be a "new" line for them. Mostly tough worsted and a few open weaves. Only blues and grays.
post #5712 of 11062
I have a reefer in Steadfast. Drapes very well. Collects dust, at least the hopsack weave I have. The Italian tailor loved it.
post #5713 of 11062
Thread Starter 
sounds the same.

The older 15s did not have their own book. There was rather this one massive book marked "flannel" that was, at most, 20% flannel and the rest was worsteds, including maybe 30-40 15oz worsteds. Very good stuff. All blue and gray, as you say.
post #5714 of 11062
Manton - thoughts on herringbone suitings? This book has a medium gray - each row of herringbone is about 1/2 inch.
post #5715 of 11062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gruto View Post

I have a reefer in Steadfast. Drapes very well. Collects dust, at least the hopsack weave I have. The Italian tailor loved it.
Collects dust as in you don't wear it? I'm looking at mostly the hopsacks in the collection.
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