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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 269

post #4021 of 9832
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I think a polo has peak (upturned) lapels. That's the way I always see them.
The Canonized Orthodox American version does. But the earlier versions, from which it derived generally did not. The earlier ones typically had a convertible, ulster style collar and a full belt, which made sense given their purpose and origin. Once it became the rage in the U.S., the half belt and DB style peak lapel were established as the standard.

I like them either way, though my "polo" is really cashmere and has slash pockets, an ulster collar, full belt and, alas, no cuffs. But it was a gift from a forumite, so I have no complaints.
post #4022 of 9832
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewfoot View Post

The one you would expect. :^)
I think that Chan fits better.
post #4023 of 9832
Gram, thanks for posting that but I can't observe any difference between the three modern photos, aside from cloth.

If it is the angle of lapels like Manton says, wouldn't King Edward's coat be the only polo?
post #4024 of 9832
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

The Canonized Orthodox American version does. But the earlier versions, from which it derived generally did not. The earlier ones typically had a convertible, ulster style collar and a full belt, which made sense given their purpose and origin. Once it became the rage in the U.S., the half belt and DB style peak lapel were established as the standard.
I like them either way, though my "polo" is really cashmere and has slash pockets, an ulster collar, full belt and, alas, no cuffs. But it was a gift from a forumite, so I have no complaints.
OK, I guess I am used to the American version. I would call any coat with an Ulster collar an "Ulster" even if it is camel hair.

I got a bespoke camel hair polo last year but the winter was so mild I did not even wear it once.
post #4025 of 9832
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkDerm View Post

I think that Chan fits better.

I think you are just seeing the sillhouette that you like better, not the fit.
post #4026 of 9832
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think you are just seeing the sillhouette that you like better, not the fit.

That's a good point. The Chan definitely hugs the body more so than the Steed so it may appear to fit better at first glance. It is certainly more "fitted" if that makes sense. My general style these days is more relaxed. As you've all probably noticed, I'm much more into blues, grays and atumnal colors than bright ones. The Steed drape style seems to fit this sensibility well. That mixed with very comfortable items make for a good combination.

I really like the snap that the Steed items have in the waist. There's a nice swoop about them that is just right. The word pizazz comes to mind albeit in an understated fashion.

I'll be getting in a DB suit in Lumb's Golden Bale navy blue flannel with red windowpane from Steed in soon and will try and post fit pics to compare against the Chan. Might not be for a little while though.
post #4027 of 9832
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think you are just seeing the sillhouette that you like better, not the fit.

What is the distinction between fit and silhouette?
post #4028 of 9832
The silhouette is the shape, style of cut.
post #4029 of 9832
The way I have seen the word "fit" used seems to be pretty broad. To me the word includes the general overall aesthetic and includes "silhouette". The concepts seem inter-related.
post #4030 of 9832
Well to me fit are things likethe collar staying on the neck, the line of the shoulder, sleeve pitch, balance. All of that should be the same regardless of style of cut.
post #4031 of 9832
Thread Starter 
they are distinct. If a jacket hugs your neck, is on the shoulder line or slightly extended, is balanced, is the correct length, and the sleeves follow the curve of your arms, it fits. Everytthing else is a matter of style/cut.
post #4032 of 9832
Perhaps fit describes the application of the silhouette to the body?
post #4033 of 9832
Credit where credit is due I learned it from Manton's book. But it makes sense to me. Certain aspects shouldn't change with the style of cut.
post #4034 of 9832
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

they are distinct. If a jacket hugs your neck, is on the shoulder line or slightly extended, is balanced, is the correct length, and the sleeves follow the curve of your arms, it fits. Everytthing else is a matter of style/cut.

Can you please elaborate more on the extended shoulders? Trying to understand exactly what it is and how it is achieved.
thanks.
post #4035 of 9832
Thread Starter 
Just feel your shoulder inside the jacket. If it's flush against the top of the sleeve, that's a fitted shoulder. If the top of the coat extends out a hair (a fraction of an inch) past the natural shoulder line, it's extended.

Extended shoulder lines are common on draped coats and also are used to give very narrow shouldered and shallow chested guys an appearance of solidity.
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