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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 1267

post #18991 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

This point I don't see as a negative.  Phoenix book is very wearable when you want something basic that you won't  have to make an effort to accessorize or fuss over figuring out how to wear/use the jacket. It's like comfort food. Basic but satisfying.

I see this book the same way the Riviera book was. Not the same weight or finish of cloth as Riviera but serves the same purpose for me.
Basic cloths/patterns with enough subtle nuance to not be pedestrian. The stuff that is easy to mix into a wardrobe and gets worn a lot.

This is all about personal taste so if you like Phoenix then have at it. When I say it's uninspiring I mean that the colors strike me as dull and lifeless and have a chalky appearance. And I wouldn't call it a book for basics - there are some pretty extreme patterns in there (the pinks for example), many of the solids have a second color flecked throughout (many times black) and a lot of the standard colors are varied shades (see the tan, for example, which is pretty orange). Again - personal preference, but I usually think of w bill as the best in a given range - the donegals, Harris tweeds, linens and lamlana strike me as top in their category - but for 10 oz worsted wool I think there are better choices. Caccioppoli/drapers do it better.
post #18992 of 19918
What do you guys think about 10% cashmere/90% wool mid weight flannel? It feels extremely soft and seems to have a decent drape, but I'm not sure how durable a fabric like that would be.
post #18993 of 19918

^

 

Only flannel I have used with that cashmere/wool content was Loro Piana and I liked it. Very luxe but soft but held a crease well. Flannel in general as not a durable cloth. Get the cashmere blend for the luxe feel but not to be a long wearing durable cloth. If you get a suit, get two trousers. As odd trousers they are great if you want a soft/luxe hand cloth.

post #18994 of 19918
Without knowing anything about that cloth, I'd have to consider the signalling involved. Anyone who puts 10% cashmere into a suiting fabric is not telling you they value durability.
post #18995 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post
 
 
This is all about personal taste so if you like Phoenix then have at it. When I say it's uninspiring I mean that the colors strike me as dull and lifeless and have a chalky appearance. And I wouldn't call it a book for basics - there are some pretty extreme patterns in there (the pinks for example), many of the solids have a second color flecked throughout (many times black) and a lot of the standard colors are varied shades (see the tan, for example, which is pretty orange). Again - personal preference, but I usually think of w bill as the best in a given range - the donegals, Harris tweeds, linens and lamlana strike me as top in their category - but for 10 oz worsted wool I think there are better choices. Caccioppoli/drapers do it better.

Don't disagree with most of what you say but don't totally agree either. Don't remember any of the extreme examples from your description of the Phoenix  cloth. Don't have the book with me, will have to revisit.

The cloth is basic but the book has some gems in it that aren't in any other books. Cloth tailors well. Probably wouldn't even show the book to you because it's not your taste.  I try to find the best cloths in everybody's sample line and match it to the clients taste and needs. No one cloth suits all. I probably use W.Bill the least, they don't make what my clients want. Porter and Harding get more interest here. Use both Caccioppoli and Drapers. Drapers has some sophisticated looks especially in the Golden Selection cards.  Loro Piana has had the best selection for jackets for about the last 5 years.

post #18996 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

Have had a jacket in this color tone in my wardrobe since the 70's.  I'm ready to add another.

 

Have settled on wearing this with mid brown or a rich caramel brown trouser. Try it with a pink shirt.

Have also settled on making them with triple patch pockets. Yours is too fancy for me

 

Never made up lamlana cloth. It's very very soft cloth and book has a lot of pastel shades, IIRC.


No claim to originality - i just had this made up with triple patch after being inspired by Crompton.  The cloth has a lot more visual interest than the one shown above and has an unbelievable hand. 

 

 

original

 

Elia Caliendo cashmere jacket44

post #18997 of 19918

This is Loro Piana plaid. Most are adding blue to grey but they went with green. Brown and green over a grey ground with faint mustard decoration. Cloth is stunning in a subtle way. 

 

post #18998 of 19918

Glad to see this thread picking up steam...good contributions all.

post #18999 of 19918

I'm not seeing any from you. Care to add some?

post #19000 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

I'm not seeing any from you. Care to add some?

Not sure if sincere, or twatty...or perhaps a touch of both. In any event, my deepest apologies for expressing appreciation over an enjoyable thread regaining steam in recent days.
post #19001 of 19918

@Despos If you've any familiarity, how would you compare the visual similarities to the Phoenix cloth mentioned earlier (14821 I believe) and the navy bamboo in the Portofino book from Huddersfield? Both seem to possess quite a decent amount of mottling, and the idea of bamboo (in theory, at least) intrigues me.

post #19002 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericgereghty View Post
 

Glad to see this thread picking up steam...good contributions all.


JeffreyD and I have written enough about steam

post #19003 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericgereghty View Post
 

@Despos If you've any familiarity, how would you compare the visual similarities to the Phoenix cloth mentioned earlier (14821 I believe) and the navy bamboo in the Portofino book from Huddersfield? Both seem to possess quite a decent amount of mottling, and the idea of bamboo (in theory, at least) intrigues me.


From my experience I would not recommend Bamboo. The cloth grows as you work with it and it drapes in a limp, lifeless way. Did not care for the cloth I used.

post #19004 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post

Without knowing anything about that cloth, I'd have to consider the signalling involved. Anyone who puts 10% cashmere into a suiting fabric is not telling you they value durability.


Not everyone values durability when selecting cloth. Have more than a few who could care less how long the suit will last. They value the hand/feel of the cloth when wearing the garments. They would never buy fresco or minis flannel or anything that wasn't refined and luxe. They get tired of clothes before they wear out and refresh their wardrobes continually.

post #19005 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
 


From my experience I would not recommend Bamboo. The cloth grows as you work with it and it drapes in a limp, lifeless way. Did not care for the cloth I used.

If not too much trouble, can you provide an expanded explanation of the bolded section? My tailor speak is amateur level (at best), and would be curious to learn...

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