or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 1258

post #18856 of 19896

Whippet is okay because his subjective and objective thought process is drawing him to a particular methodology of getting clothes made that he prefers and I attempted to validate. I adhere to his point of view but I am not a reductionist that tries to simplify things to a pat answer. All systems have the chance of succeeding or failing. 

post #18857 of 19896
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

^ I'd like to believe you, Depos, since you are a professional bespoke tailor. But many of the people saying that Whippet is completely clueless have significantly more posts on styleforum than you. Isn't that the highest form of expertise (outside of having a blog, of course

Clueless.....maybe. Admitting ignorance is much better than pretending to know everything
post #18858 of 19896
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

^ I'd like to believe you, Depos, since you are a professional bespoke tailor. But many of the people saying that Whippet is completely clueless have significantly more posts on styleforum than you. Isn't that the highest form of expertise (outside of having a blog, of course)?


you misspelled my name

post #18859 of 19896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post


you misspelled my name

Well, if it helps, I hold you in the highest regard. Right up there with rubinaci and camps de luka.
post #18860 of 19896

The point I'm curious to disambiguate is a) where two entities are one and the same b) where they are two different entities. Mr. Despos, you have described how having knowledge of both can inform either process. But what is your take on, in the English system, having people trained in these compartmentalized tasks being together in the room at the same time? Whippet is seeking an English suit. In that context, will a higher headcount in the room add anything beyond a collegial mood? I think that the time loss associated with having a crew of people present at a fitting is calculated as producing lesser gains (for the business, at least) than keeping the work moving.

post #18861 of 19896

It's one thing to keep the work moving, it's another thing to not have the work come back for adjustments. The point is to grasp the effect one has on the other and to communicate it between the two parties to execute the work properly. I eliminate this step  by doing both as one entity.

post #18862 of 19896

It is an ingenious strategy. Satisfy customers with the perceived feeling of a shorter turnaround time by back-loading the refinements to the adjustments phase. I wonder what the rate of returns for adjustments is, or if there is a greater rate of just "dealing with it" because of tedium associated with adjustments. I know I fall in the latter camp.

post #18863 of 19896

I operate in a weird way and it's not so much intentional as of necessity.  Have a long wait time but short execution time. Order a suit and it may not get cut for 6 months but you will have it in your closet 2 or 3 weeks after your fitting. 

OK, if you are a client reading this, there are exceptions! :)

 

Out of necessity have moved to a subscription/reservation system. Have clients who want X amount of suits delivered in X amount of time on a consistent, regular basis. Workroom time is set aside/assigned to them. 

Have clients who plan deliveries up to a year in advance and their suits get scheduled for start and delivery dates in advance. Workroom time is set aside/assigned to them.  Have a client who wants X amount of suits each year and is on a 10 year plan. He orders around the same time every year and the workroom time is reserved for his clothes.  Other clients purchase cloth and I hold it until client wants to put it into work. We plan these a few months in advance. This is all scheduled  and shows me how many orders I can take to fill in the rest of the time available. What goes wrong is people gain or lose weight and postpone fittings or don't show up for fittings so everything changes. That's the upside and downside.

post #18864 of 19896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

OK, if you are a client reading this, there are exceptions! :)

 

Out of necessity have moved to a subscription/reservation system. Have clients who want X amount of suits delivered in X amount of time on a consistent, regular basis. Workroom time is set aside/assigned to them. 

Have clients who plan deliveries up to a year in advance and their suits get scheduled for start and delivery dates in advance. Workroom time is set aside/assigned to them.  Have a client who wants X amount of suits each year and is on a 10 year plan. He orders around the same time every year and the workroom time is reserved for his clothes.  Other clients purchase cloth and I hold it until client wants to put it into work. We plan these a few months in advance. This is all scheduled  and shows me how many orders I can take to fill in the rest of the time available. What goes wrong is people gain or lose weight and postpone fittings or don't show up for fittings so everything changes. That's the upside and downside.

 

 

If you don't mind my asking, on average how many fittings does it usually take for a suit?

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #18865 of 19896
Quote:
Hmm be careful. It was conveyed to me that individuals who learn how make jackets then cut will have a tendency to build short cuts into the jacket. Short cuts that may not meet your expectations in a bespoke suit. 

Have experienced the opposite.  Having opened up jackets from houses fronted by cutters you wouldn't believe some of the omissions  and shortcuts. So much that I have contacted associates and asked if what I saw was ever permissible. Answer was no!

I don't hold the cutter responsible because I don't think they ever see the inside of their jackets 

post #18866 of 19896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

OK, if you are a client reading this, there are exceptions! :)

 

Out of necessity have moved to a subscription/reservation system. Have clients who want X amount of suits delivered in X amount of time on a consistent, regular basis. Workroom time is set aside/assigned to them. 

Have clients who plan deliveries up to a year in advance and their suits get scheduled for start and delivery dates in advance. Workroom time is set aside/assigned to them.  Have a client who wants X amount of suits each year and is on a 10 year plan. He orders around the same time every year and the workroom time is reserved for his clothes.  Other clients purchase cloth and I hold it until client wants to put it into work. We plan these a few months in advance. This is all scheduled  and shows me how many orders I can take to fill in the rest of the time available. What goes wrong is people gain or lose weight and postpone fittings or don't show up for fittings so everything changes. That's the upside and downside.

 

 

If you don't mind my asking, on average how many fittings does it usually take for a suit?

 

Cheers,

 

Ac


Varies. New client, 3 is sufficient but more may be required.  The answer is very much about the client. Have clients with proportions that require two fittings, always.  Have another client who hasn't had a fitting for about 20-25 suits and have only needed to adjust one sleeve longer and one sleeve shorter on all those suits. He and my system work well together. He is an exception. Not many clients I would work that way.

Must add this. I would delay finishing a suit if I thought another fitting was needed. Would rather add a fitting than have you come back for an adjustment  after delivery 

post #18867 of 19896
Is that just an English thing? Most of the tailors I know in Naples also won't have a tailor present at fittings (just cutters). Even if you order in Naples. Some use outworkers (not just for finishing, but even for trouser cutting/ making).

I can't remember who in the US I spoke to, but one bespoke tailor told me he cuts in the states and then sends the bundle to Italy for sewing. I may be misremembering.
post #18868 of 19896
At the end of the day, what really matters is the product and how it works on the client's back. If Despos's shop has their way of making suits, that's great. His track record suggests that that is one way to make it work properly. The London shops have their misfires, but also a lot of success doing it another way.

When my cutter at A&S retired, it came out that he had been using the same coatmaker for my stuff over 15 years or so. The guy worked out of his house 100 miles away, but it was pretty clear that if the man in London blinked a certain way, everything got done right. They knew how to talk to each other to get the desired result. The retiring cutter then tried to pass the maker on to his son, only to be have the maker retire (except for Prince Charles's new commissions). Sigh.

If you're a younger guy starting your own shop, you might not have first call on the best outworkers, or know how to communicate with them. A potential problem, but not one that can necessarily be solved by doing all the sewing yourself.
post #18869 of 19896
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post


you misspelled my name

Well, if it helps, I hold you in the highest regard. Right up there with rubinaci and camps de luka.


I appreciate your kind thoughts, sir, but it's hard to accept from someone with fewer than 1000 posts

post #18870 of 19896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post

At the end of the day, what really matters is the product and how it works on the client's back. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
If Despos's shop has their way of making suits, that's great. His track record suggests that that is one way to make it work properly. The London shops have their misfires, but also a lot of success doing it another way.

When my cutter at A&S retired, it came out that he had been using the same coatmaker for my stuff over 15 years or so. The guy worked out of his house 100 miles away, but it was pretty clear that if the man in London blinked a certain way, everything got done right. They knew how to talk to each other to get the desired result. The retiring cutter then tried to pass the maker on to his son, only to be have the maker retire (except for Prince Charles's new commissions). Sigh.

If you're a younger guy starting your own shop, you might not have first call on the best outworkers, or know how to communicate with them. A potential problem, but not one that can necessarily be solved by doing all the sewing yourself.

 

True, that's why  I don't want to reduce things down to say there is only one way. Have been working together with the staff I use since 1981, newest additions since 1990, and Eric who is apprenticing has been around a year. Anytime I make even the smallest change, they notice and inquire if it's a permanent change or a one time thing.  That's very satisfying to know everyone knows the way I work and are paying attention. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread