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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 1235

post #18511 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusW View Post

I can't wear pale pink shirts, but a more medium to watermelon pink gives me a nice healthy glow. Soft gray shirts make me look like the walking dead, but charcoal offers nice, rich contrast

In the multiple corduroy suit pics (above) I wouldn't choose any of them because they all have acidic yellow or golden undertones. I know from experience that I look best avoiding these colors.
 

 

I always get a kick out of GusW's posts because of the writing style. They almost always use the first-person and have a short, reportorial delivery and can-do, positive note. It's vaguely like the style of 1950s advice columns. I can't put my finger on it, but it's something that has amused me for some time. That first sentence cracks me up. Sounds like something Ann Landers would write.

 

I agree that one's good/bad colors may have some sort of biosignature unique to each person and it's best to figure these out immediately and avoid the bad ones like the plague.

post #18512 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by aristoi bcn View Post

Thanks for posting pictures S K M, these trousers look very fine (Neapolitan?). I have contacted Brisbane Moss in order to get some samples. Still awaiting an answer though. They have the widest range of cottons I've seen, not only twills but also canvas and panamas. @marcodalondra
 had made up some trousers from Brisbane Moss, maybe he knows how to order directly...

Yes indeed I have bought few times directly from Brisbane Moss, but I am based in England and I always explained that I needed it for CMT. I have both Corduroy and cotton drills from them, and IMO have an unbeatable price/quality ratio. It was a while ago (I still have a lenght to be made up) but prices were around £10 per meter...
My only comment would be about colour fastness on the red one, but that may have been the "wet" Eco dry cleaning I used for a while.

The below is the last I had made by Gianni Volpe at the end of May.
post #18513 of 19906
Does anyone know who made the suits for Black Mass?
post #18514 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post


GC-buttons.jpg

Fabric ID?
post #18515 of 19906


And to continue beating this long-dead horse, since I don't think this was ever identified, any suggestions for something similar in a summer weight? Maybe slightly larger scale?
post #18516 of 19906
Since we are beating horses and this is a similar horse to @Mr. Six, source?

post #18517 of 19906
So, I'm about to start up a new project that I have had in mind for a long time: a bespoke peacoat. I'm aiming for a design like this, sketched out for Simon Crompton by Davide Taub, though I'm going for something slightly less eccentric than what Crompton ended up with.



As for the cloth, I'm going for this all-wool 24 oz fabric that has both a great texture and some nice shades of blue.



But now comes the question: what kind of lining should I go for? I asked my tailor if a quilted lining would be an idea. "No" was his firm answer, "you'd be drowning in sweat when you ride your bike" – and given that I actually ride my bike every day (I don't know how he guessed) that option is off the table again. But I still want something more appealing than a standard navy bemberg and have considered textured silk. In a casual Drakes jacket I have there is a piece of small-scale, red paisley silk in the shoulder part which I really like, but I don't know if it would make sense for a whole coat?

Or maybe I should go for something large scale, like this below (vintage tie option from Passagio Cravatte)?



In any case, I would be very happy to hear your suggestions about how to improve my project, not least where to source the silk if you agree this would be a nice option smile.gif I remember @dieworkwear was investigating where to source silk for a dressing gown, maybe he would know?

Thanks a lot in advance!
Edited by S K M - 7/30/16 at 3:05am
post #18518 of 19906

Check Michael Alden's Sicilian peacoat

post #18519 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

Check Michael Alden's Sicilian peacoat

I will, but a link or where to find it? smile.gif
post #18520 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillingToLearn View Post

butt-ugly gunclub

 

Sorry, that one is butt-ugly. The peach tone is disgusting.

post #18521 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by S K M View Post


I will, but a link or where to find it? smile.gif

 

Hmm, someone on here probably has it. It's navy, on a tailor's dummy, outside, and rotated to face bottom left of the picture frame.

post #18522 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

Hmm, someone on here probably has it. It's navy, on a tailor's dummy, outside, and rotated to face bottom left of the picture frame.

Oh yeah, I remember it now. But what was the lining?
post #18523 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by S K M View Post


Oh yeah, I remember it now. But what was the lining?

 

Who gives a shit about the lining! It obviously wasn't crazy paisley. Just go plain.

 

Anyway, that one had a remarkable silhouette without going into the steampunk gothic weirdness of the Taub stuff.

post #18524 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by S K M View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
So, I'm about to start up a new project that I have had in mind for a long time: a bespoke peacoat. I'm aiming for a design like this, sketched out for Simon Crompton by Davide Taub, though I'm going for something slightly less eccentric than what Crompton ended up with.



As for the cloth, I'm going for this all-wool 24 oz fabric that has both a great texture and some nice shades of blue.



But now comes the question: what kind of lining should I go for? I asked my tailor if a quilted lining would be an idea. "No" was his firm answer, "you'd be drowning in sweat when you ride your bike" – and given that I actually ride my bike every day (I don't know how he guessed) that option is off the table again. But I still want something more appealing than a standard navy bemberg and have considered textured silk. In a casual Drakes jacket I have there is a piece of small-scale, red paisley silk in the shoulder part which I really like, but I don't know if it would make sense for a whole coat?

Or maybe I should go for something large scale, like this below (vintage tie option from Passagio Cravatte)?


In any case, I would be very happy to hear your suggestions about how to improve my project, not least where to source the silk if you agree this would be a nice option smile.gif I remember @dieworkwear was investigating where to source silk for a dressing gown, maybe he would know?

Thanks a lot in advance!

Is there a reason why you want to commission this bespoke? I'm of the mind that, for casualwear or things that veer far from a tailor's traditional offerings, bespoke offers little value. If it's a standard casualwear design, there will be dozens of options off-the-rack. Improvements in fit rarely matter here, as casualwear has less exacting needs than traditional tailored clothing. Sometimes, the idosyncracies in RTW fit will even look better.

If you're looking for an unusual design, RTW is still often better. Designers are usually better at design than a bespoke client, and they have the advantage of making samples (which is hard to do in bespoke unless you're willing to drop a lot of money). Plus, they're sometimes able to commission more interesting materials than what you can get from a mill (in terms of what might be workable/ appealing for a casual garment).

Just seems like the cost/ benefit ratio for bespoke really drops off a cliff for casualwear.

That said, if you're looking for a lining, you can get printed viscose and cupro through Huddersfield. Silk will hold odor more, wear warmer, and not be as durable, but if you want it, you can get some from Keytes or Adamley. They have some offcuts they can sell you (depending on the design you're after). They come in different weights, so maybe ask your tailor for his or her opinion on what weight would be best for your project.

You're probably aware, but Passagio's silks are not indeed vintage. Maybe some of them are, but most are not.

As for Alden, he commissioned a reefer coat, which is a slightly longer version of a peacoat.



Edited by dieworkwear - 7/30/16 at 3:55am
post #18525 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Is there a reason why you want to commission this bespoke? I'm of the mind that, for casualwear or things that veer far from a tailor's traditional offerings, bespoke offers little value. If it's a standard casualwear design, there will be dozens of options off-the-rack. Improvements in fit rarely matter here, as casualwear has less exacting needs than traditional tailored clothing. Sometimes, the idosyncracies in RTW fit will even look better.

If you're looking for an unusual design, RTW is still often better. Designers are usually better at design than a bespoke client, and they have the advantage of making samples (which is hard to do in bespoke unless you're willing to drop a lot of money). Plus, they're sometimes able to commission more interesting materials than what you can get from a mill (in terms of what might be workable/ appealing for a casual garment).

Just seems like the cost/ benefit ratio for bespoke really drops off a cliff for casualwear.

That said, if you're looking for a lining, you can get printed viscose and cupro through Huddersfield. Silk will hold odor more, wear warmer, and not be as durable, but if you want it, you can get some from Keytes or Adamley. They have some offcuts they can sell you (depending on the design you're after). They come in different weights, so maybe ask your tailor for his or her opinion on what weight would be best for your project.

You're probably aware, but Passagio's silks are not indeed vintage. Maybe some of them are, but most are not.

As for Alden, he commissioned a reefer coat, which is a slightly longer version of a peacoat.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


Thanks Derek for your always insightful opinions. As for bespoke vs. RTW I usually choose bespoke for the sake of fit, as the curve of my back makes it very hard to find anything RTW that hugs my neck and at the same time provides me with sufficient freedom of movement for my arms. Moreover, I like the design process (and to be fair I do believe I'm able to come up with a design that is better than any RTW – or at least that I would find better than any RTW). As for the fabric I tend to agree, though, and Drakes is a great example: They have so many insanely nice casual shirting options that I wish was available at my tailor.

Thanks also for the recommendations of Keytes and Adamley, I will check ou their options. First thing will probably be to decide whether I should go for something small-scale or large-scale (a topic I also remember you mentioning for your dressing gown – how is that coming along btw?). Shade wise I will probably opt for something not too bright so it won't look too flashy or in-your-face-like.

Cheers,
SKM

PS: As regards Alden's coat I also remember him mentioning linen as an option for lining which he apparently liked very much, though I'm not sure it would be very great here. Cashmere would probably be more suitable, but again too warm... and fragile.
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