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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 1234

post #18496 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanComposition View Post

This is the construction side of me thinking aloud, but menswear items that originated from workwear, military, or sport are tan because it appears less dirty. This is why most dudes, regardless of complexion, wear tan clothing on the jobsite.

The exception are plumbers/mechanics, who tend to wear black or dark brown. No idea why smile.gif

Maybe because a brown jacket would look less dirty given what's likely to land on you as a plumber.
post #18497 of 19906

Jake Grantham had shown me a book of corduroy recently with some "elastine" in them. It wasn't Loro Piana...but unfortunately what it was eludes me now...nonetheless...it was nice and definitely still available. 

 

Armoury in NYC has the book if you want to seek them out for more info...

post #18498 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Do you not like Jamison's corduroy suit earlier?

Admit I'm not terribly convinced by skin tone arguments. Here's Jamison's original golden tan cord suit photo:



Here he is in mossy green



And something more like a wheat tan




No changes have been made to his skin tone (or anything else in the photos, except for the color of the suit). His complexion seems pretty much the same in all three to me (ignoring the ugliness of some of the colors, as I'm not the best at Photoshop).

Side-by-side comparison, if it helps:


What Photoshop won't show is how his skin behaves when it has a different kind of light reflected on it.
post #18499 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post

What Photoshop won't show is how his skin behaves when it has a different kind of light reflected on it.

Now, this is a serious suit-science.
post #18500 of 19906
Have to agree with Gus; because of my complexion I avoid colors that are too close to the wheat, close to my face.
post #18501 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post

What Photoshop won't show is how his skin behaves when it has a different kind of light reflected on it.

I think this is the most important element. The reflecting of color onto your face from the arrangement of cloth below it has a definite impact.

I went to a custom hat maker and he (against my preference) suggested a pecan colored fedora, kind of a light tan with some warmth to it. I had wanted a dark green or navy and he told me I couldn't have it. He said navy and green would do nothing for me. So I asked how/why?

We then spent several minutes exchanging different color hat forms on my head and told me to focus on my cheeks and under my eyes. When the pecan color landed it lit up my face (to my surprise).

I pushed it a bit further and we tried an off white form thinking it was just the lightness of the pecan color. Again to my surprise it wasn't, the off white did nothing.

He wasn't trying to sell me one color over another all the prices were the same. He just new from experience that pecan was my color.

I know it's not the same for suits/shirts ect. But this was a heck of an experience.

The color reflecting off of your face, much like a cologne will change when mixed with your natural smell, can enhance your over all look.

Or just wear all black.
post #18502 of 19906

Fwiw, I'm also w/ Gus and the others on color.

post #18503 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanComposition View Post

Have to agree with Gus; because of my complexion I avoid colors that are too close to the wheat, close to my face.

Do you mean the color for Jamison I labeled as wheat? That just seems like a hard color to wear, regardless of skin complexion, no?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post

What Photoshop won't show is how his skin behaves when it has a different kind of light reflected on it.

Do you mean how your skin and the jacket underneath will look under different shades of light?

Or do you mean how the light hits the cloth and then reflects off your skin?

The first seems like it would make little difference, since the change is somewhat uniform. You could manipulate that in Photoshop (unless I'm not understanding you correctly)

The second might be an issue, but honestly ... at that point, we're getting into such crazy complicated considerations of dressing, it almost seems a little absurd. Like, X outfit would look good at 7am, when the light shines at so-and-so angle, but once you hit noon, the light bounces in a way that suddenly makes you look bad?
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Fwiw, I'm also w/ Gus and the others on color.

Again, I'm not saying that certain colors don't flatter your complexion more than others. I'm questioning: 1) the kind of nuanced rules people try to draw from this; 2) the generalizability of those rules; and 3) how we understand these things in context of the larger, and seemingly more complicated, ways we interpret color. If sandy tan Barbour jackets are bad for fair skinned people, is that because we think of Barbour jackets as more iconic in green? Does the same hold true for olive skinned people? Is there a reason why sandy tan raincoats and polo coats are considered iconic in the UK and US?

Aside from our preferences for corduroy suit colors, is there any noticeable difference in how Jamison looks in the three photos I mocked up? I feel like his complexion is the same in all three photos. And my preference for which looks best would stand true regardless of the wearer's skin tone (I like the olive version best). If that holds true for everyone else viewing the photos, what can we draw from skin-tone theories?
Edited by dieworkwear - 7/29/16 at 12:36am
post #18504 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

The second might be an issue, but honestly ... at that point, we're getting into such crazy complicated considerations of dressing, it almost seems a little absurd. Like, X outfit would look good at 7am, when the light shines at so-and-so angle, but once you hit noon, the light bounces in a way that suddenly makes you look bad?

 

My valet carries around a luxometer and steamer trunk and changes my clothes for me depending on ambient light conditions and current cloud cover.

post #18505 of 19906
I seem to recall a lot of discussion of skin tone and cloth colour in Alan Flusser's Dressing the Man.
post #18506 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winot View Post

I seem to recall a lot of discussion of skin tone and cloth colour in Alan Flusser's Dressing the Man.

A lot of men's style books have a chapter on this. Maybe a good 75% of them. And a lot of the content feels lifted from Carole Jackson's 1987 book Color for Men, which basically transports 1970s make-up theory for women into men's style.

There are so many counterexamples to the rules she sets in there, however, that you end up wondering the usefulness of the rules in the first place.
post #18507 of 19906

Definitely an 80s-90s thing.

post #18508 of 19906

DWW, then we're probably more in agreement then not.  I actually think he looks better in the tan, but that may be because it's the original.  He had a dark brown corduroy suit, that I thought looked best.  But I can't seem to find an image of it. 

post #18509 of 19906
One of the key points is that it isn't just the color, it is knowing the the right shade of any color that makes all the difference for your complexion.

I can't wear pale pink shirts, but a more medium to watermelon pink gives me a nice healthy glow. Soft gray shirts make me look like the walking dead, but charcoal offers nice, rich contrast

In the multiple corduroy suit pics (above) I wouldn't choose any of them because they all have acidic yellow or golden undertones. I know from experience that I look best avoiding these colors.

Given a choice of corduroy, I would select a mossy green (with less gold/yellow and more blue), a heathered charcoal gray, chestnut browns have depth and work (but not yellow-cast or chocolate, chocolate being too flat). Again, I stay away from corduroy, tweeds and twills with a yellow cast.

I can't wear certain shades of camel. The more pale sandy colors look blah. I've tried for years and they just don't look right. But camel with a bit more of a brownish/red cast makes all the difference when I try on both. Yet, I see guys with darker features who look great in sandy camel jackets.
post #18510 of 19906
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

A lot of men's style books have a chapter on this. Maybe a good 75% of them. And a lot of the content feels lifted from Carole Jackson's 1987 book Color for Men, which basically transports 1970s make-up theory for women into men's style.

There are so many counterexamples to the rules she sets in there, however, that you end up wondering the usefulness of the rules in the first place.


This made me laugh because, too @dieworkwear 's point, when I met Carole at a book publishing trade show when she was launching this book in 1987 I asked her, "What is my season?" (she divides everyone into Fall, WInter, Spring, Summer colors) and she began to stumble back and forth between "Well you could be a Summer or maybe you are a Spring?". So much for an expert opinion!

The problem, once again, is that it isn't just colors that are right for you, it is knowing how to select or avoid certain shades of colors and no author I know of has done this properly. Perhaps because it can't be broken down into a few groups? It is really much more individualized.
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