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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 1233

post #18481 of 19905
I have a jacket in that and I never wear it. It's a great example of a cloth that looks great as a bolt and would probably make a nice pillow for your reading chair, but otherwise kind of sucks.
post #18482 of 19905

The H&S corduroy bunch is really extensive, and really nice. They've got a lot of unusual and interesting colors. My favorite corduroy was from Dugdale-- a really heavy (18 oz?) camel yellow in a medium wale. Rich, soft, sturdy, and inexpensive. I don't see it on their website anymore, though. Their current corduroy bunch is different from what I got-- lighter weight and artificial fibers in the mix. Could not recommend any of those per se, but if they still offer the old stuff offline I would highly recommend.

post #18483 of 19905

I assumed good corduroy be stiff at first but get softer over time.  Am planning to get a sport coat in Brisbane Moss's dark olive, 8 wales, 16.5 oz.  Am thinking fully lined.  

 

Any of the above a bad idea?

post #18484 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusW View Post

As a color suggestion, (And this is my own opinion) stay away from gold or gold shades of tan or brown unless you have a naturally dark or olive complexion. It washes the color out of most peoples faces in Fall/WInter. It looks good on a hanger but even with a nice blue shirt it can make you look rather pale.

Where were you when I tried to state my case on skin tone/complexion................
post #18485 of 19905

Corduroy is best when it's beaten-up and lived in, for sure. Good corduroy will soften, but it should always retain a sturdy quality.

 

Here's a very early example of the corduroy suit, "velvet cord" (1939, from Esquire Magazine):

 

post #18486 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolpapa View Post

I have a jacket in that and I never wear it. It's a great example of a cloth that looks great as a bolt and would probably make a nice pillow for your reading chair, but otherwise kind of sucks.

What about the jacket makes it unwearable?
post #18487 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

I assumed good corduroy be stiff at first but get softer over time.  Am planning to get a sport coat in Brisbane Moss's dark olive, 8 wales, 16.5 oz.  Am thinking fully lined.  

Any of the above a bad idea?

It definitely softens over time.

8 wale is too wide, IMO. 16.5oz sounds good though. That's the same as what I used for my suit and I like it.
post #18488 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusW View Post

As a color suggestion, (And this is my own opinion) stay away from gold or gold shades of tan or brown unless you have a naturally dark or olive complexion. It washes the color out of most peoples faces in Fall/WInter. It looks good on a hanger but even with a nice blue shirt it can make you look rather pale.

Do you not like Jamison's corduroy suit earlier?

Admit I'm not terribly convinced by skin tone arguments. Here's Jamison's original golden tan cord suit photo:



Here he is in mossy green



And something more like a wheat tan




No changes have been made to his skin tone (or anything else in the photos, except for the color of the suit). His complexion seems pretty much the same in all three to me (ignoring the ugliness of some of the colors, as I'm not the best at Photoshop).

Side-by-side comparison, if it helps:


Edited by dieworkwear - 7/27/16 at 5:39pm
post #18489 of 19905

He had a dark brown one too.  I liked that one best.

 

Thanks for the thoughts on the corduroy.  I think 8 is perfect.  I'd go for 9 too, but I'm w/ UC on wider wales, at least for sport coats.  I like wide or narrow for pants.  Probably would never get a suit, since I rarely wear suits.

 

@Bromley, I have a swatch of Dugdale 8 wale and it's pretty nice, just a bit lighter in weight than I'd prefer.

post #18490 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bromley View Post

My favorite corduroy was from Dugdale-- a really heavy (18 oz?) camel yellow in a medium wale. Rich, soft, sturdy, and inexpensive. I don't see it on their website anymore, though. Their current corduroy bunch is different from what I got-- lighter weight and artificial fibers in the mix. Could not recommend any of those per se, but if they still offer the old stuff offline I would highly recommend.

Mine too - and I think it's actually more like 21oz. Sadly they discontinued it and it's all sold out. The new stuff is OK but nowhere near as good.
post #18491 of 19905

Has anyone had a chance to handle/commission the "Fox Twist" collection by Fox? 

post #18492 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Do you not like Jamison's corduroy suit earlier?

Admit I'm not terribly convinced by skin tone arguments. ]


I would not choose the color fabrics of Jamison's or Vox's cord suits for my own.

These gold-cast tans, browns, khaki's washout fair skinned folks. I'm in this group. I'd look like I hadn't slept if I wore one of these in January. Greenish cast tans and green cast khaki's are much better. There are many shades of green and the richer, mossy ones are best where brighter bottle greens (more yellow, less blue in the mix) don't work either. It isn't quite so apparent in the midst of Summer if you are out and getting sun regularly but in Fall and WInter the fair skinned (especially those with a pinkish cast) need all the help they can get to keep from looking pale and washed out. This is why a classic green Barbour looks naturally better on the majority of fair skinned folks in WInter compared to a sandy tan jacket. So it isn't just a color, it is also the shade of the color that counts.

As mentioned earlier, if you have a naturally darker complexion, olive skin, no problem. If you are Asian, Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, your skin tone is most likely deep enough that you have never even had to think about looking washed out in Fall/WInter.

Of the corduroy suit photos you first posted, Charlie Watts suit color is the best compliment to his complexion of the groups. That says a lot considering he has what appears to be the most pale complexion of all of them (although Vox's complexion is a black dot, right? smile.gif. )

Photos however can be misleading due to light and exposure. The real test is in real life where the right colors enhance a more healthy looking, natural color to the complexion rather than washing them out.

Color study is a facinating field. I enjoyed my professional association and study with the Color Marketing Group and Color Association USA in order to apply color fashion and social trends to successful consumer products. But I never found a definative guide to Men's colors. At best they are good but a bit general. I can, however, sit down with someone and give them a one-on-one guide reflecting the nuances and subtleties of what colors and shades of colors work best for them.
post #18493 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusW View Post

I would not choose the color fabrics of Jamison's or Vox's cord suits for my own. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

These gold-cast tans, browns, khaki's washout fair skinned folks. I'm in this group. I'd look like I hadn't slept if I wore one of these in January. Greenish cast tans and green cast khaki's are much better. There are many shades of green and the richer, mossy ones are best where brighter bottle greens (more yellow, less blue in the mix) don't work either. It isn't quite so apparent in the midst of Summer if you are out and getting sun regularly but in Fall and WInter the fair skinned (especially those with a pinkish cast) need all the help they can get to keep from looking pale and washed out. This is why a classic green Barbour looks naturally better on the majority of fair skinned folks in WInter compared to a sandy tan jacket. So it isn't just a color, it is also the shade of the color that counts.

As mentioned earlier, if you have a naturally darker complexion, olive skin, no problem. If you are Asian, Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, your skin tone is most likely deep enough that you have never even had to think about looking washed out in Fall/WInter.

Of the corduroy suit photos you first posted, Charlie Watts suit color is the best compliment to his complexion of the groups. That says a lot considering he has what appears to be the most pale complexion of all of them (although Vox's complexion is a black dot, right? smile.gif. )

Photos however can be misleading due to light and exposure. The real test is in real life where the right colors enhance a more healthy looking, natural color to the complexion rather than washing them out.

Color study is a facinating field. I enjoyed my professional association and study with the Color Marketing Group and Color Association USA in order to apply color fashion and social trends to successful consumer products. But I never found a definative guide to Men's colors. At best they are good but a bit general. I can, however, sit down with someone and give them a one-on-one guide reflecting the nuances and subtleties of what colors and shades of colors work best for them.

I suppose my thing with color theory is: it seems like the easiest thing to prove, but I've never come across convincing evidence of it (despite style writers including a chapter of it in every single book). Often times, when they try to show photos of the effect, they'll include two completely different images. For example: X guy in a navy suit, and then Y guy in a tan suit (or whatever non-navy color). But obviously, when you present two different people, in two different backgrounds, in two different photos, there are so many moving variables that it's hard to pinpoint the issues in our judgement.

Seems to me like the test should be:

1. If the claim is that skin tone looks different when set against different jackets, change the color of those items and see if the wearer's complexion indeed looks different. (Which is what I tried to do with Jamison above, but his complexion looks the same in all three photos to me. Could be that he's not the right complexion for your theory though, since I think you're saying this only applies to certain complexions?)

2. If the claim is that our preference for an outfit changes depending on the interaction of skin color + garment color, show the three photos above and find a person's preference for what looks best. Then take a similar model, but in a different skin tone, and have them modeled in the same three garment colors. Then show those photos to the same person and see if their preference changes. Repeat 1,000x to get generalizable results. (I can't do this for obvious reasons, but it seems like an easy task for the kind of people who write about this stuff).

I buy that certain colors flatter our skin more than others. I suppose I'm just not sure the nuances of where to go from there, how generalizable such theories can be, and how this intersects with the dozen or more other ways we receive and interpret colors.

For example, a sandy tan Barbour jacket may wash out the complexion of a fair skinned person, but sandy tan trenchcoats and polo coats have looked great on fair skinned people for generations. Is it because we're used to seeing those items in those colors? Or maybe because they're fashionable in those colors?
Edited by dieworkwear - 7/28/16 at 5:30pm
post #18494 of 19905
This is the construction side of me thinking aloud, but menswear items that originated from workwear, military, or sport are tan because it appears less dirty. This is why most dudes, regardless of complexion, wear tan clothing on the jobsite.

The exception are plumbers/mechanics, who tend to wear black or dark brown. No idea why smile.gif
post #18495 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanComposition View Post

This is the construction side of me thinking aloud, but menswear items that originated from workwear, military, or sport are tan because it appears less dirty. This is why most dudes, regardless of complexion, wear tan clothing on the jobsite.

The exception are plumbers/mechanics, who tend to wear black or dark brown. No idea why smile.gif

Is why I wear tan underoos smile.gif
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