or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 1222

post #18316 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by aristoi bcn View Post

This silk is outstanding. I'm looking for something similar in order to have made a summer dinner jacket "a la Attolini".




In southern climates, if you want to wear a jacket in a night party, this has to be very lightweight and with a porous cloth.

BTW, would you recommend a lightweight navy mohair as a paired trousers? Any other suggestion? 
This sort of thing could go with conventional black DJ trousers, but you could also turn it into a sport jacket, with or without any kind of tie. So trousers of charcoal, slate blue, Madras, pure white, etc...

My first thought would be to get something porous and not warm for the jacket. Probably not silk, but linen or some weave of tropical wool.
post #18317 of 19918

Ok, I did pictures, as You can see there are some neat details like stripes that fits all together.

Waiting for support.

Tom

 

 

 

 

 

post #18318 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winot View Post

I take your point, but ultimately I think Davide Taub came out of it pretty well. And having met him, I'd say it is a fairly accurate portrayal of his personality.

I really enjoyed the piece. Over the years, these kind of creative writing takes on bespoke tailoring are the only ones that stick in my mind (and frankly the ones I enjoy the most).
post #18319 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winot View Post

I take your point, but ultimately I think Davide Taub came out of it pretty well. And having met him, I'd say it is a fairly accurate portrayal of his personality.

Thanks for posting the article. It was a fun read. I thought the anecdote about tipping was a little unfair and there are better ways to make the point that Taub doesn't have a lot of money. For someone who doesn't have a much experience with bespoke I thought the writer did a really good job of describing some of what it is about.
post #18320 of 19918

I read it twice and found the anecdotes intriguing, but the writing style obtuse and banal. At least the ending was clever.

post #18321 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by cchen View Post


Thanks for sharing.

I really don't like the writer and the way that he wrote this article.

1. If his intention was really to try and copy a bespoke G&H suit, certainly going to a sub-par tailor isn't going to accomplish that. I understand there were budgetary constraints, but if he had considered a tailor in HK it would have been possible to achieve his goal.
2. The writer doesn't seem to have enough experience or knowledge about tailoring to write about it intelligently.
3. His characterization of Davide, while showing him elegantly in some sections, overall is just awkward, such as the section about tipping.

 

I'd have to agree with this. An author who doesn't take time to learn about his subject won't be able to draw the reader in. The article falls flat. There's no passion there. Highlighting DT's financial position after the gracious way DT had shared his time and knowledge is crass. Furthermore the ending that attacked the rich was uncalled for. It's people who are willing to pay that much for a suit that enable DT and others on the Row to do what they love for a living. 

post #18322 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winot View Post

Fantastic New Yorker article about Davide Taub's work (Gieves and Hawkes):

http://www.newyorker.com/business/currency/the-suit-that-couldnt-be-copied?mbid=rss

 

I personally have similar experience when dealing with some of the tailors in HK (both Indian / south east asian or Chinese run shop) 

- claim to be full canvas, but came out pure fused

 

just like the Vietnam tailor, also some tailor asked if I had gained weigh, or been doing too much push up, when I said the jacket is hugging my chest too tight.....

post #18323 of 19918
Very vulgar article. Vulgar to mention anything to do with the tailor's finances.
Downright bizarre of the writer attack the 'rich' people who buy high-end tailoring - makes the guy sound like a jealous hater basically.
post #18324 of 19918

It sounds like the commenters in this thread are either rich and personally offended or unfamiliar with how the American essay works.

It's not a reportorial newspaper article (not that those are shining paragons of integrity anymore); it's a New Yorker magazine essay. American writing, fiction or otherwise, of the last 50 (100?) years is as much about the author's own subjective feelings and insecurities as it is about the subject being discussed. He explores the feelings/discomfort associated with wanting what you can't afford, and the implications of being able to afford things that 99% of the world cannot. That is actually one positive of this article.  The pedestrian, uninflected writing style is not.

post #18325 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

It sounds like the commenters in this thread are either rich and personally offended or unfamiliar with how the American essay works.
It's not a reportorial newspaper article (not that those are shining paragons of integrity anymore); it's a New Yorker magazine essay. American writing, fiction or otherwise, of the last 50 (100?) years is as much about the author's own subjective feelings and insecurities as it is about the subject being discussed. He explores the feelings/discomfort associated with wanting what you can't afford, and the implications of being able to afford things that 99% of the world cannot. That is actually one positive of this article.  The pedestrian, uninflected writing style is not.

This is where the article is flawed though. Not everyone who buys high-end tailoring is 'rich' (unless we go down the route that anyone who lives in the West is by default a a 1%-er...)

Some people save all year (or more) on a median-average 1st world economy salary to make it work. I've heard that many a time from different high-end tailors; taxi drivers etc etc, you name it. Are they to be sneered at too?
post #18326 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by jedwards View Post


This is where the article is flawed though. Not everyone who buys high-end tailoring is 'rich' (unless we go down the route that anyone who lives in the West is by default a a 1%-er...)

Some people save all year (or more) on a median-average 1st world economy salary to make it work. I've heard that many a time from different high-end tailors; taxi drivers etc etc, you name it. Are they to be sneered at too?

 

That was encompassed by my comment. People also save up a lot and buy tailoring; in fact, that is a key demographic today. But the pang of spending the equivalent of your kids' tuition fund is also going to produce feelings of inadequacy, regret, and yearning. All of those were covered in the article. He spends above what he can afford, but cannot resist. That is a recurring topic on this very forum. I don't think that involved sneering. There was a mix of emotions, all unresolved. I think you're reading it wrong. The disdain for the wealthy was one transient feeling among others. It was also described in a rather sudden way, as though it was an involuntary and kneejerk response; he analyzes his own bias. I highly doubt that the epilogue to this story is that he boycotts tailoring.

post #18327 of 19918
I read a lot of New Yorker essays and how this one got past the editors is beyond me. While I can agree with many of the comments above the bottom line is that the essay lacked a central theme and cohesion and the writing was meh. It started as a process for trying to replicate a world class product (though seriously - the jet plane analogy??) using lower cost techniques. Had he stuck to that and explored the process of creating the replica and its inherent shortcomings and then maybe commented on how he wanted the product rather than the craft behind it that might have been interesting. Had he following Mr. Taube the cutter around New York for a few days to give some insight into the itinerant lifestyle of a traveling tailor service and the sacrifices made to get clients a world class product and how that made the author guilty that might have been interesting. Even if the theme was the extremely high prices paid for clothing that can be bought for a fraction of the cost OTR and the people that justify those prices to themselves (possibly including the author) that might have been interesting.

Instead he immediately abandoned his initial idea and tried a couple of other cheap tailors, had Mr. Taube look at the work to somehow comment on how it missed the mark with very little real justifying the price difference (did the author really expect his mail order suits to fit as well as a bespoke or even approach the level of quality?) and them got Mr. Taube to find fault in his very customers (though it felt to me that the author perhaps forced this a bit). The article smacks of a clever idea that ended up not working but the author needing to get paid for his 1500 words.

The author also had a very low level of literacy for men's tailored clothing so reading the article does not provide the reader with any incremental insights.
post #18328 of 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by bertie View Post

I read a lot of New Yorker essays and how this one got past the editors is beyond me. While I can agree with many of the comments above the bottom line is that the essay lacked a central theme and cohesion and the writing was meh. It started as a process for trying to replicate a world class product (though seriously - the jet plane analogy??) using lower cost techniques. Had he stuck to that and explored the process of creating the replica and its inherent shortcomings and then maybe commented on how he wanted the product rather than the craft behind it that might have been interesting. Had he following Mr. Taube the cutter around New York for a few days to give some insight into the itinerant lifestyle of a traveling tailor service and the sacrifices made to get clients a world class product and how that made the author guilty that might have been interesting. Even if the theme was the extremely high prices paid for clothing that can be bought for a fraction of the cost OTR and the people that justify those prices to themselves (possibly including the author) that might have been interesting.

Instead he immediately abandoned his initial idea and tried a couple of other cheap tailors, had Mr. Taube look at the work to somehow comment on how it missed the mark with very little real justifying the price difference (did the author really expect his mail order suits to fit as well as a bespoke or even approach the level of quality?) and them got Mr. Taube to find fault in his very customers (though it felt to me that the author perhaps forced this a bit). The article smacks of a clever idea that ended up not working but the author needing to get paid for his 1500 words.

The author also had a very low level of literacy for men's tailored clothing so reading the article does not provide the reader with any incremental insights.

 

Bingo, boring to read and with a deadpan delivery uttely devoid of any rhetorical flourish or delivery. Book report level.

post #18329 of 19918
It was an interesting article for a number of reasons:

1. Taub provided a garment to the author for copying. This is a first. Perhaps, a few "copycat" cheapskates will try to pull the same gimmick with Taub or other tailors? Has Taub opened a Pandora's box? nod[1].gif

2. The article illustrates that a copy is a copy. Sometimes the copy is excellent, and sometimes it is terrible. If you want the real thing, go to the source. Don't waste time and money.

3. As for whether Taub or the author think that the rich are jerks, the rich have the last laugh (as usual). They could not care less what the tailor thinks about them. All they want is the service and the clothes.

4. The article reinforces the perception of quality and service of Savile Row.
Edited by Mark Seitelman - 7/12/16 at 1:16pm
post #18330 of 19918

I just want to let the record show that I believe the vast majority of Gieves & Hawkes' clientele is not taxi drivers.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread