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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 1111

post #16651 of 19898
It's all going to come down to how tough you wear it. It shouldn't be your go to suit or your go to sport coat, but it should hold up fine to normal daily activity as part of a rotation.
post #16652 of 19898
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

8 ounce fabrics can be problematic. A few perform very well, but generally the lighter you get, the worse the drape and issues with wrinkling. Outside of summer stuff, I tend to err on the side of heavier stuff, but up to you.

I was afraid to get a response like this! Although I wear suits for a living, I don't know THIS much about suiting or fabric or weights. Am I going to have a tough time with this? I just want something I can wear all year... I'm a jeweler so I'm not going to be doing anything craZy with it, but I don't want to hassle with having to get it pressed or anything, either.

Stay away? If so, go for more 10oz stuff? Any rule of thumb? They have a nice selection of linen and cotton/linen blends that look nice and are apparently a bit heavier - what's the feeling there?


And to the guy above me, his name is "Lam" in Rowland heights "lams tailoring"
post #16653 of 19898
Quote:
Originally Posted by atila View Post

Went and talked to my tailor today about the fabric, told him it was 8oz weight and he said that that is too light. He said it's not enough heft and will wrinkle. He's older asian guy who has had his shop here for 20+ years and does very solid work so I trust his opinion and judgement 100% but I also love that fabric. I think I'm going to purchase it anyways - any opinions or anything?

He is quite right that it will wrinkle and won't have much heft. There are lots of guys who don't mind that and get them anyway. If you want a warm-weather suit in a fabric that will keep that tailor happy, I'd go for a 10oz wool fresco or a 14oz pure linen.

If you live in a four-season climate, there really is no such thing as a year-round suit. You live in LA, so I guess you don't have that problem.

If you go for pure linen, I'd stay at 12oz or above. Anything below that wrinkles like crazy.
post #16654 of 19898
Atila, what are you needing this for? Is it a sport coat, or suit, and what will its purpose be?

Definitely do not get the Icarus for either if you are looking for a work horse...
post #16655 of 19898
I have a suit in 8 oz Loro Piana wool/linen/silk. I like it a lot but it's pretty delicate so I don't wear it as often as I originally wanted.
post #16656 of 19898
Quote:
Originally Posted by atila View Post

I was afraid to get a response like this! Although I wear suits for a living, I don't know THIS much about suiting or fabric or weights. Am I going to have a tough time with this? I just want something I can wear all year... I'm a jeweler so I'm not going to be doing anything craZy with it, but I don't want to hassle with having to get it pressed or anything, either.

Stay away? If so, go for more 10oz stuff? Any rule of thumb? They have a nice selection of linen and cotton/linen blends that look nice and are apparently a bit heavier - what's the feeling there?


And to the guy above me, his name is "Lam" in Rowland heights "lams tailoring"

True year round fabrics don't really exist. If you're in a warm climate, 10 ounces is a good benchmark for getting as close to year round as possible. Somewhere cooler like Chicago, 12-13 might be better. You'll need something cooler for the worst days of summer. The trade-off is less drape and more wrinkling. You need to figure out how much you can tolerate in the name of staying cool(er).

Fresco or open weave wools that wear cooler than their weight would suggest are decent options. If you don't mind wrinkles, tropical weight wools are an option; some wrinkle less than others, but you do have to be careful. Just don't pick up an 8 ounce cloth and expect it to perform like an 11 ounce one.
post #16657 of 19898
Thought regulars in this thread may also have a view on this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by sebastian mcfox View Post

Over the weekend I commissioned a midnight blue dinner jacket in Huddersfield Scissett wool/mohair (9oz) (http://www.huddersfieldcloth.com/Product/6831), and a grey sharkskin suit in Huddersfield Lindley Collection merino wool (9oz) (http://www.huddersfieldcloth.com/Product/7000).

Anyone have experience with either of these books?
post #16658 of 19898
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

True year round fabrics don't really exist. If you're in a warm climate, 10 ounces is a good benchmark for getting as close to year round as possible. Somewhere cooler like Chicago, 12-13 might be better. You'll need something cooler for the worst days of summer. The trade-off is less drape and more wrinkling. You need to figure out how much you can tolerate in the name of staying cool(er).

Fresco or open weave wools that wear cooler than their weight would suggest are decent options. If you don't mind wrinkles, tropical weight wools are an option; some wrinkle less than others, but you do have to be careful. Just don't pick up an 8 ounce cloth and expect it to perform like an 11 ounce one.

Ok, so I guess I need to go for 10oz stuff... not seeing anything on that site specifically that has a 10oz variety AND has some sort of visual/physical texturing - something to give it a *little* different feel and slight more casual than just a regular business jacket. Any recommendations on the site I'm missing OR a different company?
post #16659 of 19898
What would you guys get for a second sport coat in hot weather for courtroom wear? I already have a Navy fresco, 3 patch with smoked MOP buttons and double stitching. Hopsack? If so, which fabric? Tan fresco? It'll mainly be worn with Holland & Sherry Crispaire pants in light grey.
post #16660 of 19898
Limnis, wool hopsack will run hotter and less breathable than fresco of the same weight.

Hot-weather courtroom? I'd probably get a suit in navy or mid-blue 13 oz. linen; maybe medium gray linen or tobacco. But out of light colored odd jackets, I guess tan fresco sounds good.
post #16661 of 19898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testudo_Aubreii View Post

Limnis, wool hopsack will run hotter and less breathable than fresco of the same weight.

Hot-weather courtroom? I'd probably get a suit in navy or mid-blue 13 oz. linen; maybe medium gray linen or tobacco. But out of light colored odd jackets, I guess tan fresco sounds good.

Sorry, didn't notice the linen part, lol. Linen may be too casual except for Fridays. Austin is casual, but I don't know if it's that casual.
post #16662 of 19898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

Let me quote u :

'I've heard bolts of that same Islay tweed have circulated amongst many SR tailors. I was in London last week and two of the tailors were talking about this very fabric, and how it's impossible to sell and everyone is keen to get rid of it asap. One of them even mentioned how the majority is now in Huntsman's hands, and he wondered how they'd ever get rid of it.
 

I think this refers to a specific lot of cloth. I have several jackets made from Islay Tweed that I bought directly from the mill and I love them. More rugged finish than some others but even the lightweight (13 oz) will last a lifetime.
post #16663 of 19898
I appreciate there are a number of dependent variables, including the weave of the cloth. However, does anyone have a sense / rule of thumb for how much a pure cashmere cloth will wear than a pure wool? If I have a 22oz wool overcoat, would replicating it in 22oz cashmere make it appreciably warmer?
post #16664 of 19898
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonC View Post

I appreciate there are a number of dependent variables, including the weave of the cloth. However, does anyone have a sense / rule of thumb for how much a pure cashmere cloth will wear than a pure wool? If I have a 22oz wool overcoat, would replicating it in 22oz cashmere make it appreciably warmer?


I have a 11-12 oz W Bill 100% cashmere, that feels really warm. Warmer or the same as a Porter & Harding thornproof suit I own. 16 or 18oz.

post #16665 of 19898
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonC View Post

I appreciate there are a number of dependent variables, including the weave of the cloth. However, does anyone have a sense / rule of thumb for how much a pure cashmere cloth will wear than a pure wool? If I have a 22oz wool overcoat, would replicating it in 22oz cashmere make it appreciably warmer?

 

I see that I am not the only Londoner with a wardrobe caught in the sudden stretch of cold weather; of course, @SimonC and myself are probably the two people whose thoughts immediately goes to "hey.. that Everest Cashmere overcoat finally makes sense now"

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