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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread - Page 1065

post #15961 of 19905
Yes, Despos mentioned it happened to his mohair pants at the leg crease. I'll have it made up eventually but just not expect for it to last forever (and maybe not press it so much).

The mohair's color is so rich compared to wool or other fabrics.
post #15962 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I've avoided Finnmeresco because of the weight issue. I actually have 3 suits from Minnis 9.5/10 fresco and find it unwearable in summer. Given the way the weather in NY has been the last few years, these suits don't get much wear because the "tween" seasons seem to be about two weeks/year. Though, the navy BlazerSuit™ jacket gets a lot of wear in NorCal and elsewhere.

When Finnmeresco first came out (2007?) it was all 12 ounces and I thought "this cannot be good." Since then they have added lighter weights, but I've not bought. I was taken by the colors--much better than Minnis--but still, too heavy.

The Minnis 8/9, though, is by far the best thing I own for summer heat. The range is limited and there is only one blue, which is way too dark, but still, the grays are terrific.

I guess it depends on your constitution, but for me, it seems that only winter-heavy and summer-superlight offer good values.

I also find that silk lining is way hot, which puts me at odds with the Rubinacci aficionados, but what can I do.


I love the 9.5/10 fresco.

It's perfect for all but two weeks of the London summer but I agree it's too warm for NYC.

I actually wear it a ton from like Sep - Nov and Mar - May. Unless it's really cold or really warm, it's perfectly comfortable for me.
post #15963 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabrigian View Post

I love the 9.5/10 fresco.

It's perfect for all but two weeks of the London summer but I agree it's too warm for NYC.

I actually wear it a ton from like Sep - Nov and Mar - May. Unless it's really cold or really warm, it's perfectly comfortable for me.

Clearly much depends on ones climate and personal temperature tolerance.

I wish the Smith's was more wearable or that I got darker shades and could use it in the early spring and fall. Alas, I ended up doing tans and olives thinking that fresco = summer. Live and learn.
post #15964 of 19905
Thread Starter 
I like the cloth a lot and the way it performs, but it just doesn't work for me in the heat. The blue jacket is the definitely the most versatile piece, because even in brisk weather, with a shirt under it, it's comfortable. But wearing the pants with it on a windy, 60 degree day--you will feel a chill, no question.

I have a length of some crazy Lesser 14 ounce mohair blend in a fresco weave--it's gorgeous cloth but among the most impractical I've ever bought. I really ought to sell it to someone who's always cold.
post #15965 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I like the cloth a lot and the way it performs, but it just doesn't work for me in the heat. The blue jacket is the definitely the most versatile piece, because even in brisk weather, with a shirt under it, it's comfortable. But wearing the pants with it on a windy, 60 degree day--you will feel a chill, no question.

I have a length of some crazy Lesser 14 ounce mohair blend in a fresco weave--it's gorgeous cloth but among the most impractical I've ever bought. I really ought to sell it to someone who's always cold.

Interested...not always cold, but...INTERESTED.

post #15966 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabrigian View Post

I love the 9.5/10 fresco.

It's perfect for all but two weeks of the London summer but I agree it's too warm for NYC.

I actually wear it a ton from like Sep - Nov and Mar - May. Unless it's really cold or really warm, it's perfectly comfortable for me.

Life hack: stop eating iron and become anemic, so you feel cold all the time. That way, you can wear heavier fabrics.
post #15967 of 19905
Q: There's a beautiful 15oz. tweed I'd like to have made into a car coat, but fear that the cloth is too light to act as a real winter coat. Would it be possible / sensible to have the tweed lined in a 11oz. moleskin, or would that be inappropriate for a lining?
post #15968 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post

Q: There's a beautiful 15oz. tweed I'd like to have made into a car coat, but fear that the cloth is too light to act as a real winter coat. Would it be possible / sensible to have the tweed lined in a 11oz. moleskin, or would that be inappropriate for a lining?

Won't that catch?

What about getting a quilted and filled interior? (I imagine that'll add to your cost, but maybe it won't be too bad if you use a tailor in Hong Kong or something).
post #15969 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post

Q: There's a beautiful 15oz. tweed I'd like to have made into a car coat, but fear that the cloth is too light to act as a real winter coat. Would it be possible / sensible to have the tweed lined in a 11oz. moleskin, or would that be inappropriate for a lining?

I have multiple coats that are lined in flannel, both wool and cashmere, and that works quite well. Alpaca is also a great liner material.
post #15970 of 19905
Thread Starter 
My thought is that moleskin will be a little too dense and unyielding.

Alpaca is great because it can be woven very loose and still insulate well, and it doesn't pill.
post #15971 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Won't that catch?

What about getting a quilted and filled interior? (I imagine that'll add to your cost, but maybe it won't be too bad if you use a tailor in Hong Kong or something).

That was my first thought too.

A quilted lining should work well and will be as warm as anything
post #15972 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

My thought is that moleskin will be a little too dense and unyielding.

Alpaca is great because it can be woven very loose and still insulate well, and it doesn't pill.


You could do an alpaca pile as well...even have it made to be removable. This would be my move. Image via O'connell's.

O'Connell's Greatcoat - Olive Tan Whipcord front - Full Alpaca Lining

post #15973 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Life hack: stop eating iron and become anemic, so you feel cold all the time. That way, you can wear heavier fabrics.

I wouldn't be surprised if Sator had gotten involved with steez-induced anemia.
post #15974 of 19905

So what does this lovely tweed for the car coat look like? Honestly curious now that you've teased us.

 

I like the idea of flannel lining, personally.

post #15975 of 19905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post
 

 

 

Same problem

+2

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