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Dormeiul

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
How do you pronounce that?
post #2 of 21
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post #3 of 21
and not dore-mule as many would think.
post #4 of 21
Quote:
and not dore-mule as many would think.  
IMMSMC, it is D-O-R-M-E-U-I-L. Perhaps it is the idiosyncrasies of Japanified pronunciation in my French education, but IMMSMC it is pronounced dor-MOY IMMSMC, Jack Simpson used to design for them before he went to Oxxford (OX-ferd).
post #5 of 21
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post #6 of 21
Ask someone who speaks French to say 'Dormeiul' and I think you'll find that it is a mix of dor-may and dor-moy with eu sound in there.
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
The reason I ask is that after spending most of the day going from place to place I found my heart's desire in a fabric for a sportcoat. I saw it at Spano's in Saks and it's by (you guessed it) Dormeiul. Now that I "have" my fabric let me ask you if I can expect most other establishments to have that fabric available to them. For example, can I go to Oxxford and tell them what I want?
post #8 of 21
I may be studying French, but my pronunciation skills have a long way to go. Having studied Italian for two years and studying German concurrently with French complicates things somewhat. Therefore I am unqualified to comment on the nuances of how to pronounce "Dormeuil." I first visited Switzerland a few years ago, and visited again recently. It seemed to me that a good number of Swiss are equally fluent in (Swiss) German, French, Italian and English. How nice it must be to be a landlocked country bordered by Germany, France and Italy.
post #9 of 21
Oxxford tends not to indicate which mills its fabrics are from. There are, of course, exceptions. Oxxford had a special book of Guabello fabrics and also had an elaborate wooden chest of Moxon Super 180s fabrics. Most of Oxxford's fabrics are simply labeled, for example, "Super 110s, woven in Scotland." Remember that Dormeuil is a fabric merchant, not a weaver. I believe that Dormeuil sources the majority of its fabrics from the UK. You may want to look among actual weavers' swatch books for similar cloths.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Ask someone who speaks French to say 'Dormeiul' and I think you'll find that it is a mix of dor-may and dor-moy with eu sound in there.
Well put. No, it's not completely a "MOY", because that's not how French is. There's a soft L (a <<L mouillé>>) at the end, and, well, it's one of those complicated French words. Your mouth opens and does funny things. Similar ending sounds were represented throughout the centuries with the "-ilh" (as in Jean Anouilh). But manton, talk to a Frog in the trade and ask him or her to say it. However, if you asked a French person how to say "DORMEIUL" they would look at you funny. It's Dormeuil, dammit. The "ei" sound in French is pronounced a bit like "AY" so yes, if a French person was asked to pronounce that misspelling, they might croak out something like that. Of course, my favorite (pidgin) French saying is, ALLEZ CUISINE............. which yes, means nothing coherent but Fuji Television made me say it.
post #11 of 21
Where is ernest when you need him?
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Where is ernest when you need him?
post #13 of 21
It's pronounced Dor-may. I had the pleasure of meeting Ashley Dormeuil in Chicago when he spoke to our now defunct collectors group, The National Cuff Link Society (yes, there was a group solely dedicated to cufflink collectors). He pronounced his name as Dor-may so I think that's your answer.
post #14 of 21
I do not know how to prononce it, but I am glad that it is still in existance. When I first went to London in 1971, I used to see a lot of it for sale in fabric stores. The idea was to buy it material on your own and then find a good tailor in Soho or the East End to make your suit for you. Saved a bundle over Savile Row. Less commonly done these days. My favorite store in Atlanta tried to get me to buy material in London and bring it back, so it could send it to Norman Hilton for a MTM. The other two big English fabric houses were Hunt & Winterbotham (spelling?) and Allen Solly (also for knits). Do either still exist? I think that Federated eventually bought the right to use the Allen Solly name on its own line of clothing, mostly Asian made. Just like the Alfani, Club Room, etc., names are used now.
post #15 of 21
Hunt & Winterbotham still exists as part of Huddersfield Fine Worsteds.  Sadly, HFW seems to be in some kind of trouble and is up for sale.  The fabric merchants J & J Minnis and John G. Hardy are part of HFW, as is Martin & Sons, one of the mills which weaves Escorial. Hopefully HFW, like Holland & Sherry, will not be folded into the Individualized Apparel Group.
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