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Heat and cold in shining shoes

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
has anybody tried using temperature changes while shining shoes? I was tought to heat up wax based polish prior to application, and I have heard of people using ice water, or ice, in the final polish stage. the heat is supposed to make for better obsorption - the cold is supposed to help remove excess, I think. anybody use this, heard of this?
post #2 of 14
In A Harris' post on antiquing shoes, he recommended putting them in a freezer for 1/2 hour after the application of wax polish, then removing them, allowing them to return to room temperature, and polishing. I used this process when I antiqued my Grensons--however, I can't really be certain what difference it made in the overall outcome. Montecristo
post #3 of 14
I'm pretty sure that when he made that post he was just doing it more as a good luck charm than an actual technique.
post #4 of 14
By freezer, do you mean the compartment with 0 / below 0 degree Celcius?
post #5 of 14
I was once taught a technique for heating the wax AFTER you've applied it to the shoe--but I'm not sure I recommend this. After application, but before buffing, slowly move a burning matchstick over the waxed leather. Supposedly this melts the wax and results in a more even application. I've always been clutzy and feared I would set the room on fire.
post #6 of 14
Yep.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
I was tought to (and I am not making this up) set fire to the tin of wax polish, let it glow for a few seconds, put the lid on to put the fire out and then use a butter knife to slather the hot wax on the shoe.
post #8 of 14
Freezing really does change the finish - the wax polishes to a higher finish, and the finish lasts longer. I don't know why it works, but it certainly does.
post #9 of 14
I was taught to apply wax evenly on the shoes from the tin, then spray the shoes with lighter fluid and ignite them, resulting in even distribution of the wax and a slighly charred look. [Note -- just kidding.]
post #10 of 14
I have a cryogenic chamber about the size of a microwave and I stick my shoes in there and take them down to -600 Celsius for 15 minutes after each step of the polishing process. This allows the wax molecules to properly align and creates an impenetrable shiny barrier against the outside world. I can't do it for any longer because after about 20 minutes Walt Disney's head and Jeffrey Dahmer's brain would start to thaw out, and I have to put them back in there. Not really. Sometimes I feel like Deuce Bigalow on here... "I collect Canadian quarters, I have about four of them..."
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
A harris (and everybody else, he just seems to know a hell of a lot about shoe shines) I read an article about some people who finished off their polish with champane. On the one hand, I thought that this was jsut assinine, but it was suggested to me that the alchohol did contribute something to the final stages of the shine. first, any ideas on this? second, I was thinking of using vodka at a very low temperature in a spray, much the way some people spray water on shoes in the final stage of a "spit shine" thus using the element of cold in a slightly more convenient manner. any idea how this would work?
post #12 of 14
I use a little Gin in polishing my shoes. A liitle goes in me, a little on my shoes. I think it helps. Esp newer (non EGs) that have that oh-so-shiny stuff from the store. I have also used alcohol swabs, the first aid kind, to clean the previous layer before applying a newer layer.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
A harris (and everybody else, he just seems to know a hell of a lot about shoe shines) I read an article about some people who finished off their polish with champane. On the one hand, I thought that this was jsut assinine, but it was suggested to me that the alchohol did contribute something to the final stages of the shine. first, any ideas on this? second, I was thinking of using vodka at a very low temperature in a spray, much the way some people spray water on shoes in the final stage of a "spit shine" thus using the element of cold in a slightly more convenient manner. any idea how this would work?
IMMSMC, champagne in polishing is a Berluti fetishist thing. As I was informed in Paris, the Swann Club (generally just friends of Olga Berluti) gather in palace hotels to sip fine champagne (at first Dom, now just [sic] Veuve Clicquot) and to use it to polish their shoes with scraps of fine linen. They also discourse philosophically, in the masturbatory French way. As Chairman of Kitchen Stadium even I find this wasteful (of the champagne, not the discourse). Any embellishment added by champagne over normal alcohol (assuming you want to remove a layer of finish) or a few drops of water (assuming you want to hone your shine) is just that -- embellishment. I have tried it with red wine. It is enjoyably self-indulgent, as much so and as unproductive as Scrooge McDuck bathing in money.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
I was once taught a technique for heating the wax AFTER you've applied it to the shoe--but I'm not sure I recommend this.  After application, but before buffing, slowly move a burning matchstick over the waxed leather.  Supposedly this melts the wax and results in a more even application.  I've always been clutzy and feared I would set the room on fire.  
Slightly safer: see step 4. Haven't tried this on my shoes yet though, for fear of drying out the leather.
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