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Investment bankers clothing - Page 2

post #16 of 34
I agree with other posters that you shouldn't go too over the top. If I saw an analyst wearing Brioni I would be rolling my eyes (not that I would know unless he told me). The second you make the slightest mistake, people will be thinking things like "maybe he should spend less time on his clothes" and things like that. It is silly, but you could develop a bad image through no fault of your own. I think Canali or something similar would be more appropriate.
post #17 of 34
Quote:
Contrary to the sartorial tastes of many on this forum, french cuff shirts with silk knots (or real links) are completely appropriate with slacks alone, and are in fact common.
Amen. Jon.
post #18 of 34
Globetrotter: I think the question isn't as much dressing how you like, vs specific brands that may be appropriate, and I think there will be a bit of disagreement here. Obviously most of us aren't suggesting he go against the very clearly stated business formal dress code. There isn't any "over the top" about Brioni, unless you wear the tag on your sleeve that says "Brioni" It's a clean, understated suit, that looks good, and if you wear it in a conservative color (charcoal, navy) you won't have any issues. I worked in IB and with several mutual funds for several years (including one of the most conservative, old-guard, MF companies) and wouldn't hesitate to wear Brioni, all day and every day, if it was an appropriate color/pattern. I think rsp was correct in saying that if you wear an appropriately colored/patterned brioni, 90-99% of people will not notice, or say "nice suit" at best, and the ones that do will be interested. When it comes to watches/accessories, a little more care must be taken to find items that are understated, but say you are wearing a $15k Patek, it is easy to say you received it from your father/grandfather, etc... I wore a daytona much of the time without issues, but I would recommend against something gaudy (14k/ss, gold, etc)
post #19 of 34
drizzt agreed, I was trying to (gently) take exception to those posters who said basically to wear what ever you wanted. I think that that was a little irresponsible. In a conservative office enviroment, the new guy can't wear what ever he likes. but I would agree that he can wear a better cut of the same kind of thing that others are, and perhaps one really good accessory, without attracting too much attention.
post #20 of 34
I totally agree with KidKim's comment here. I love Borrelli and especially love Belvest, but would I feel just a little self-conscious in such a suit among my co-workers, most of whom where the horribly baggy blue shirt and khakis, and only occassion wear cheap suits? Yes, probably. But when I wear my Oxxford -- even though I personally think Louis Boston's Belvest suits are more "elegant" or "dashing" -- I feel perfect. Fits like a glove, super comfortable, beautiful fabric, most handwork, etc. But the difference between the Oxxford and a fused dreck, to the naked eye, is very subtle (unless you know the differences). Yes, it is clear that my suit looks better, but to the unknowledgeable observer -- which is really the ones we care about when we discuss dressing too "expensively" (because the people who know would appreciate such dress) -- it's not clear why. I love that. So, in sum, I'd say you should strongly consider going with MTM Oxxford if you really want to spend that much (or go with Oxxford Bespoke if you can get to Louis Boston for a weekend -- I'm not sure if the NYC Oxxford store offers bespoke). Not all Oxxford cuts are classically American, and even those that are are really elegant because of their understativeness (something that isn't appreciated in a dressing room, but is appreciated in real life I have found). Brooks Brothers Golden Fleece MTM is another really good option, IMO, as is Purple Label MTM (not sure if that's still going on right now). I think both St. Andrews and Greenfield will do a more understated suit than Brioni will. (Brioni is indeed the don't f with me suit).
post #21 of 34
always dress better that your subordinates but never better thatn your superiors
post #22 of 34
I know it's been said, but honestly, as long as the fabric is conservative, and it's accessorized conservatively, 99.99% of people are going to have absolutely no idea you are wearing a Brioni suit (that's assuming they have even heard of Brioni) as opposed to Hickey Freeman, Brooks Brothers etc. And for those who know the difference, I doubt they will think badly of you.
post #23 of 34
Quote:
I know it's been said, but honestly, as long as the fabric is conservative, and it's accessorized conservatively, 99.99% of people are going to have absolutely no idea you are wearing a Brioni suit (that's assuming they have even heard of Brioni) as opposed to Hickey Freeman, Brooks Brothers etc. And for those who know the difference, I doubt they will think badly of you.
Honestly - chances are that if they do not wear very expensive clothes themselves, they won't know the difference when they see it. As long as you are not wearing a monogram Gucci tie and crocodile boots and all these other tacky things that scream "way too much money," no one is going to bother you about it.
post #24 of 34
Quote:
Quote:
(A Harris @ 21 Oct. 2004, 6:46) I know it's been said, but honestly, as long as the fabric is conservative, and it's accessorized conservatively, 99.99% of people are going to have absolutely no idea you are wearing a Brioni suit (that's assuming they have even heard of Brioni) as opposed to Hickey Freeman, Brooks Brothers etc. And for those who know the difference, I doubt they will think badly of you.
Honestly - chances are that if they do not wear very expensive clothes themselves, they won't know the difference when they see it. As long as you are not wearing a monogram Gucci tie and crocodile boots and all these other tacky things that scream "way too much money," no one is going to bother you about it.
Yup. Most people don't know crap from peanut butter, clothing-wise, unless a logo is screaming in their face. koji
post #25 of 34
If you're going to be working all those hours, might as well spend you're money on some fun clothes. Otherwise, what's the point...?
post #26 of 34
Quote:
And for those who know the difference, I doubt they will think badly of you.
Actually, that's exactly what I was cautioning about earlier, though my example setting is very specific and non-I-bank. Perhaps you have to understand the economics of large law firms to understand my example. Many partners are still bitter about the fact that during the tech boom, associate salaries were driven through the roof, allowing associates to buy significantly nicer cars, gadgets, and clothes. When a partner with a Patek Philippe on his wrist and a distinctly Neapolitan suit complains that associates 2 years out of school are buying things he couldn't afford until he made partner, query whether you want that guy thinking about your fancy threads when he's making bonus recommendations ("screw him, he's got plenty of money"). Or whether he wants a young associate who habitually wears very nice clothes to be the one to meet with the client's very important, but underappreciated and underpaid in-house attorneys who complain about the firm's rates every month ("damn, now they're REALLY going to bitch about the bill"). My point is not that one should be a purposeful slob or purposefully wear cheap clothing, but rather that one needs to read their surroundings and factor them into the clothes they choose.
post #27 of 34
I could see that when it comes to Associate vs Partner salaries, but then again, if associate salaries were skyrocketing, the partners have to be doing quite well for themselves as well... Once the dot.com collapse happened, I imagine many of these associates found themselves a bit overextended. I agree with it comes to accessories, some displays of wealth are quite obvious, but at the same time, sometimes an outward display of wealth/success is what you are looking for and quite useful.
post #28 of 34
I cannot believe some of the stuff on this thread. In Australia (thankfully) it is totally different. Nobody gives a damn what you wear. I have worked for three stockbrokers and have ALWAYS dressed far superior to my superiors and they know it. In fact, at all three firms all the senior executives and CEOs come to me for fashion/clothing advice. The fact that I wear and have worn Brioni/Kiton since my mid 20s and more fashion-friendly labels like Gianni Versace and Gucci doesn't bother them in the slightest nor had it ever been a point of contention. Most are appallingly dressed anyway. This hierarchical thing seems to me peculiarly American?
post #29 of 34
are you in a line position? not to be rude, but are you in a support position, or are you in a position that you will expect to advance one day to a similar position as your superior? a assosiate in a law firm actually has less freedom than the head of the IT support, in terms of that kind of thing. and I would say that in most of Europe it is the same way, in my experience, notonly america
post #30 of 34
I'm an equities analyst and VP.
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