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Quality and value of the "second tier" of British clothes - Page 2

post #16 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
Do you feel less insulted by $100 "˜Italian' made t-shirts?

Jon.

nice.
post #17 of 35
Of course because Italian labour is a lot more expensive.

To sum up those British brands, cheap fabrics, crap cuts, terrible clothes.
post #18 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
Aquascutum: striving nobly... to be Burberry.

Nicely put - they're pimping their house check on socks, scarves and baseball caps. It used to be a mildly aspirational brand; now it's working hard to appeal to a whole different segment of the market. It still has a lot of brand traction within the middle classes though. They just don't know which way to go. Their offerings vary from highly pedestrian to very acceptable, esp. at discount (their raincoats and overcoats fall into the latter category I think). I've yet to see something truly killer from them, though sometimes the rare Collection items are cool.


Quote:
Originally Posted by acidicboy View Post
How about Paul Smith and Paul Smith London? Anybody has a learned opinion on them?

I must admit I didn't think to include Paul Smith - I consider his stuff more of a designer item and a cut above the other brands being discussed. But hey, let's discuss them all; why not.

I like lots of it; even the PS line often has some cool items. I picked up a PS brown plaid overcoat with velvet collar with a great cut a year or so back that I absolutely love.


Quote:
Originally Posted by flatfront View Post
I think if you can find some Dunhill without the logo plastered all over it you get a nice quality garment, some of which are nicley designed too. They are far too expensive for what they are at retail but some good bargains are to be had at sale time.

I'm tempted to agree. The cuts aren't great for me though (a bit boxy). I've found some with decent fabrics and if you can get it around half price or less I think there are worse suits out there.

Quote:
Hackett suffers from the staff that work in the stores IMO its either snotty young blondes who think they are something special or young guys who think they are something special becuase they work in Hackett. Strangley this seems to be universal to every one of their stores I have ever been in in London.

The "snotty young blonde" thing is so spot on, it's scary.

Agreed about most of the guys, though there are one or two rare exceptions.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
There's also Daks.

For some reason, when I think of Daks, I think of a brown multistripe 70s suit. Not sure if they ever had an advert featuring such a suit, but it's a really contaminated brand in my mind. I gather they used to be high quality, but I haven't heard much good about them in ages. How are they these days?
post #19 of 35
Every time I walk into the Dunheel store on rue de la Paix I think of when it was the Heritage Boutique and it's depressing to look at some of the tat they have. Even their ultra-expensive limited knickknacks like a 6500 euro set of stuff in Russia Calf just seem sort of pedestrian. The Dunheel vanity book leaves the impression that the Heritage Boutique is still there and that it's not just another Dunheel store catering mostly to a logo-conscious tourist clientele.

If only they put their Heritage Boutique cufflinks on sale...

I have a soft spot for Aquascrutum since their flagship still sells sized socks and has kid gloves. And the Aquascotum raincoat is supposedly still of very high quality. They used to have their own factories for suits and stuff.
post #20 of 35
I wonder how much 'second-tier' British stuff is actually British.. Wasn't that the conclusion of that radio programme about Northampton? We hardly make any shoes anymore but the one ones we do make are pretty good.
post #21 of 35
Hackett: almost nothing made in England.
Burberry: almost nothing made in England, except maybe the raincoats and socks.
Aquascrotum: ditto? Maybe its suits are made in England too, or England/Madagascar (Wensum).
Dunheel: I think most of the leather accessories are still made in England, but certainly not the clothes. The shoes are now made in Italy; I forget if they are still branded "Poulsen Skone", which was a dumb idea to begin with.
post #22 of 35
Since most of this stuff is not made in England, the pound is so high, and retail is generally expensive there, I don't think there's much relative value. Better to come to New York and shop at middle of the road places. Everyone seems to be doing it.
post #23 of 35
Daks has some OK stuff and is very good value when on sale. I mean it is nothing special on the construction front sure but I picked up a nice Herringbone sports coat in the sale for under £200. Nice enough cut - will need a bit of tweaking from the tailor, nothing major mind.
I do still like their house check too, mind you it's only a matter of time before the chavs latch onto it here in the UK just liek they have with Burberry and Aquascutum.
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Of course because Italian labour is a lot more expensive.

Unless they are paying Chinese immigrants to attach the "Made in Italy" tag.
post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by water View Post
Unless they are paying Chinese immigrants to attach the "Made in Italy" tag.

Only a few brands up to that and laws been passed in Italy to ban it, certainly the factories like Corneliani, Brioni, Canali I've not heard of any of that going on.
post #26 of 35
I like Jaegar's shirts as they fit me well off the rack and I live near a retail outlet and can get them cheap.
post #27 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
Burberry: almost nothing made in England, except maybe the raincoats and socks.

Some models of raincoat are made in England, but plenty of other in Romania or Turkey (I forget which). There are lots of different styles and several different fabrics but if you want 100% cotton outers, those are still Made in England only as far as I can see.
post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart View Post
I bought my first PS mainline suit in 1996, made in England, full canvas, amazing fabric for $1000

Now his mainline suits are $2000+ (inflation is a bitch but 100% increase in 10 years??), still full canvas, but made in Italy. Fabrics are still cool, but not as good as they used to be.

Even Sir Paul has had to shift production abroad to stay competitive with the other brands in his spectrum. Which is too bad, but a part of doing biz these days.

His London line is ok, a bit conservatively styled...the "luxury" London line is half canvassed afaik...tho the regular London is a normal fused suit, albeit a very soft and light fusing which most fashion brands employ these days. Not the end of the world.

Thanks GS. I was looking at a Paul Smith London navy suit a few days ago, on sale at around $650 of your depreciated American currency. The only thing iffy with me about it is if the tailor is able to do alterations according to my satisfaction.
post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by UK2004 View Post
Only a few brands up to that and laws been passed in Italy to ban it, certainly the factories like Corneliani, Brioni, Canali I've not heard of any of that going on.
I was recently in China, and went to some of those factory outlet stores were one to be charitable. In fact, these stores sell items from factories that produce for big names like Ralph Lauren, etc. As one expected, I saw genuine Polo garments with the tags cut off, but I also chanced upon several high-end designers, like Miu Miu, Dolce & Gabbana and Chloe. I've no doubt that these things were authentic as I suspect there isn't much a market for fake sequined ruched satin jackets with leopard print lining for women. The Miu Miu, Chloe, etc. were all priced at about $50.
post #30 of 35
I bought a Burberry wool sweater about a year or two ago, because I loved the colour and the texture of the knitting (nothing fancy, just a simple sweater with a nice colour; no cashmere stuff). However, I have only used it a very few times, and the other day I noticed that the "collar" had come loose and needed mending. That had NEVER happened to me with any other sweaters, including cheap ones bought more than a decade ago at places like H&M and subjected to very frequent and hard use. I will probably never buy a Burberry item again. I feel that it is like paying made in England prices for made in China goods. Still, the colour is beautiful. And I may just have had bad luck and picked to rotten apple out of the basket full with fresh ones.
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