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post #16 of 28
Lomezz-- But in a certain kind of setting (not saying this is it) and a certain kind of guy (not saying you are he) turning up in black tie could be a really. . . remarkable kind of statement.
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Thanks to all who chimed in. I haven't had a chance to check the forum all day long - gotta earn my upkeep so said partner can throw a dinner party and fly me over fropm NYC for it... Anyway, I'm happy the consensus seems to be blazer/sportcoat, wool pants, tie optional, because I was secretly hopping to be coaxed into 'dressing up'. I think that pretty much settles it. only problem - I don't have a decent navy blazer. Imagine that. Could it be time to go shopping? guess so... Kai - thanks for that feather story. That's the first laugh I had all day.
Another route: actually telephone, and ask if he or she is dressing for dinner.
post #18 of 28
I like the blazer, gray trouser and brown shoe idea. Can't go wrong in any instance. I believe the "informal" to which KidKim refers is actually a code in which one wears a business suit. Black tie, in that traditional sense, would fall under "evening semi-formal." So, assuming those intentions by the host, showing up in a dinner jacket would definitely be much. Drizzt's idea of wearing a dark suit would apply, but I'd wear a tie, and be prepared to take it off if need be. Aram
post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 
Update: I called the firm's event planner to RSVP and, by the way, asked about dress code. She said definitely not suit, blazer/coat optional. I assume most partners will be blazer-ed, most associates blazer-less. Might be a good chance for me to differentiate myself.   This is nothing compared to a summer party I was invited to last year at an executiev's house at my old firm. The invite said something like: "dress to the sevens in your best summer whites". You should have seen the bewildered emails between invitees as to what "sevens" and "best summer whites" actually mean. Needless to say, very few actually wore any white, and there were quite a few who were clad in black.
post #20 of 28
Seeing that its in Boston, pending the outcome of tonights game I suppose anything in pinstripe might be a bad Idea... Lomez: One laugh all day is UNNACEPTABLE JJF
post #21 of 28
aramg-- I'm afraid I'm going to have to stand corrected (re "informal")--and if you knew how painful that is. . . .   I will note in my defense, however, that "informal" attire for evening wedding parties is--at least in my neighborhood--black tie.  Not that there are all that many evening wedding parties. . . . I haven't seen the word "semi-formal" in a long, long time.  (Has it become hopelessly declasse, like "semi-classical"?)  But I seem to remember its appearing, several lifetimes ago, on invitations to the (suburban) Assemblies, to which, I think, most boys of my generation wore dark business suits.  (But could have, and should have, worn black tie.)
post #22 of 28
Quote:
I believe the "informal" to which KidKim refers is actually a code in which one wears a business suit. Black tie, in that traditional sense, would fall under "evening semi-formal." So, assuming those intentions by the host, showing up in a dinner jacket would definitely be much. Drizzt's idea of wearing a dark suit would apply, but I'd wear a tie, and be prepared to take it off if need be.
It's surprising how few men know these conventions anymore.  Everyone on the board knows by now that my style might have been formally described as "working in the mines" a century ago.  Nevertheless, it is useful to know even the conventions one does not adhere to.   KidKim, these days, a semi-formal refers to an event to which undergraduates wear khakis and blue blazers, and usually an oxford buttondown.  And loafers.  I know it would pain you... Fixed a typo.
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
But in a certain kind of setting (not saying this is it) and a certain kind of guy (not saying you are he) turning up in black tie could be a really. . . remarkable kind of statement.
And a remarkable statement it will be, alright. It might just remarkable me out of  job  
post #24 of 28
No, no, LA Guy. That's the other fellow--and he's no longer with us. I'm crazy about loafers with practically anything--and, to prove it, I plan to post a drop dead portrait of me in my Oxxford glen plaid suit (SartorialSolutions), white MTM Brioni dress shirt, Talbott Best in Class tie, and black Alden shell cordovan tassel slip-ons.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
 Everyone on the board knows by now that my style might have been formally described as "working in the mines" a century ago.
LA Guy, I think Vanity Fair magazine has just described this look well: "haute gas station attendant"  
post #26 of 28
Quote:
LA Guy, I think Vanity Fair magazine has just described this look well: "haute gas station attendant"
Those are the guys who wear a lot of DSquared. (Seriously, that label ran out of ideas in a hurry. Did we need another season of "Diner" shirts?) I prefer "Designer Mall Rat".
post #27 of 28
Hmm, I've seen the following divisions lately: Business Casual: Slacks/Khakis, Oxford/Polo, Blazer optional. Semi Formal: Business suit, tie Formal: Black Tie Does that make sense or is there just a huge varying definition of semi-formal?
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Hmm, I've seen the following divisions lately: Business Casual: Slacks/Khakis, Oxford/Polo, Blazer optional. Semi Formal: Business suit, tie Formal: Black Tie Does that make sense or is there just a huge varying definition of semi-formal?
This is a good summary of how terms are used my most people, now. However, the traditional divisions (for evening - if we have to get into daytime functions, things just get unnecessarily complicated for the purposes of this thread) are: Formal - white tie (tails) Semiformal - Black tie Informal - business suit Casual - odd jacket and trousers. Going without a jacket was pretty much unheard of. A shirt is seen primarily as an *undergarment* if you will. The jacket and trousers are the clothing. That's why, in lots of traditional men's shops, shirting is separated from the tailored clothing section. There is no business casual, traditionally. That was an excuse for no-style execs to wear polo shirts tucked into their pleated chinos.
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