or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Roast chicken recipes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Roast chicken recipes

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Any good ones out there? I usually just rinse and dry the chicken and then shower it with kosher salt and pepper and put it in a 450 degree oven for an hour. It's simple and good, but wanted to try something with herbs or lemon, or any other recipe out there. Any one have a good recipe?
post #2 of 18
A simple one I do is coat the chicken in salt pepper and garlic powder. Then I coat the chicken in olive oil and stuff the inside with whole sprigs of basil. Baste the chicken as it cooks and when you serve it pull the basil out and serve it on the side.
post #3 of 18
I buy the freshest chicken I can find. Even if I have to drive to Chinatown--- they get the live chicken from the cage and they'll dress it for you:-) I rub the chicken with lemon or lime, salt, peper, garlic inside and roast it in a turbo broiler.
post #4 of 18
jleeo225, I've been roasting chickens lately according to Thomas Keller's recipe found in his "Bouchon" cookbook. It's roasted same as in your recipe but the chicken is trussed, or tied up, making it more compact, hence keeping it more moist. After it's taken from the oven, Keller adds thyme to the pan and bastes the chicken with the juices and thyme as it rests for 15 minutes. It's delicious, bistro style.
post #5 of 18
+1 for the Bouchon recipe. Disarmingly simple and delicious
post #6 of 18
I like to create some sort of seasoning mixture (rosemary, garlic, S&P; lemon, S&P; chili powder, cumin, coriander; infinite variations possible), add it to olive oil or butter, and by making small incisions in various points of the skin, introduce it under the skin. This gives the meat itself a great deal of additional flavor. I also start the bird upside down to crisp the skin on the underside of the thighs, then flip it part way through cooking to crisp the top likewise. ~ Huntsman
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by lidprop View Post
jleeo225, I've been roasting chickens lately according to Thomas Keller's recipe found in his "Bouchon" cookbook. It's roasted same as in your recipe but the chicken is trussed, or tied up, making it more compact, hence keeping it more moist. After it's taken from the oven, Keller adds thyme to the pan and bastes the chicken with the juices and thyme as it rests for 15 minutes. It's delicious, bistro style.

ding ding ding ding. This is my default roasted chicken recipe. I add some roasting potatoes in the pan, with thyme, pepper, kosher salt, and let the chicken fat does the magic work. They taste delicious afterward.

Here's the recipe online: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/231348.
post #8 of 18
The Zuni Cafe roast chicken with bread salad is amazing. It gets a little hot and messy in the oven but it rivals the Keller one, which I have made a lot. I actually like the Zuni one better.

I like to also, take an orange or a lemon and an onion, clean and rinse it, cut each into quarters and stuff and truss the bird with herbs. Comes out great and smells wonderful too. Make sure to truss the bird to seal in the flavor.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/4401342
post #9 of 18
+1 on the marble potatoes on the pan. I use sea salt, a sprinkling of olive oil, rosemary, cracked pepper and lots of garlic on mine. The chicken fat mixing with the baking potatoes give a superb smell and taste. As for the chicken, one thing I add to the roasting is I stuff a couple of whole onions, sprigs of whatever herb's available, whole garlic and a whole lemon stabbed with a fork inside the cavity. I also cut a slice across the skin in the breast part and rub some rosemary between the skin and the meat part.
post #10 of 18
This is VERY simple and comes out fantastic. Yogurt is a staple in making Indian curries
  1. Buy good yogurt! Russian style or other full fat (brown cow, stonyfield etc).
  2. Leave the yogurt at room temp for 3-4 hours. Makes it tarter and much more flavorful.

  3. Get chicken, sprinkle with mixture of little vinegar, hot crushed peppers, ginger powder or fresh crushed ginger, kosher salt.

  4. Chop onion.

  5. Put olive oil in dutch oven, heat oil, brown chicken. Put onion in the pan. Fry to browness you like.

  6. Dump handful of peeled (can be bought from store that way) garlic cloves.

  7. Dump yogurt into pan.

  8. Put on lid,

  9. stove top or oven. 40 mins.

  10. Serve with steamy basmati rice. Yogurt makes great sauce.
I also add a few unpeeled jalapenos. That way those who like hot can bite them and those who dont are not forced.

Can also dump grape tomatoes/cashews/ sultanas/ dried apricots/turnips etc into pan to add variety.


Baby japanese turnips (farm markets) and boiling onions are also good.
post #11 of 18
I've never seen a Kosher bird in this city but I'm sure some of you can find them. I'm always disappointed if I don't brine a normal bird first -- no one else bothers to brine?
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHoff View Post
I've never seen a Kosher bird in this city but I'm sure some of you can find them. I'm always disappointed if I don't brine a normal bird first -- no one else bothers to brine?

IMO, most of the chickens that I roast (usually for 2-3 people only) are too small to fully benefit from the brining process. Besides, I find the kosher salt on the skin salty enough for my taste. Unless you're one of those who don't like crispy roasted chicken skin--in which case, you're insane!
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lidprop View Post
jleeo225, I've been roasting chickens lately according to Thomas Keller's recipe found in his "Bouchon" cookbook. It's roasted same as in your recipe but the chicken is trussed, or tied up, making it more compact, hence keeping it more moist. After it's taken from the oven, Keller adds thyme to the pan and bastes the chicken with the juices and thyme as it rests for 15 minutes. It's delicious, bistro style.

Ah, yes, trussing. I should do that, but never seem to have any butcher twine lying around. Does recipe call for rubbing olive oil or canola oil on the bird before salting it?
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
ding ding ding ding. This is my default roasted chicken recipe. I add some roasting potatoes in the pan, with thyme, pepper, kosher salt, and let the chicken fat does the magic work. They taste delicious afterward.

Here's the recipe online: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/231348.

That sounds very good - do you cook the potatoes for the entire time that you cook the chicken, or add them during the cooking process?
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jleeo225 View Post
Ah, yes, trussing. I should do that, but never seem to have any butcher twine lying around. Does recipe call for rubbing olive oil or canola oil on the bird before salting it?

No. See here for recipe.

If you don't have twine, I'd substitute unflavored and non-waxed dental floss if you got it lying around.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Roast chicken recipes