or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › First pair of shoes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First pair of shoes

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I bought my first pair of "real, grown-up shoes" last week. I'm very proud of them. I originally had my mind on the C&J Weymouth, but they didn't come in cordovan, so I didn't do it. Instead I picked up a pair of RL Marlow Bluchers in cordovan. I wear them without socks, and they are very comfortable. I can tell they will soon develop a crease just above the toe area; Will shoe trees prevent this? Also, should I get anything on the soles to prevent wear? Look how the toe will eventually take the most amount of wear.
post #2 of 15
...
post #3 of 15
Are they shell cordovan or cordovan-coloured calfskin? And please don't wear those beauties without socks mate, that's bad for them.
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Are they shell cordovan or cordovan-coloured calfskin? And please don't wear those beauties without socks mate, that's bad for them.
They are shell cordovan. Though they do sell the same model in calfskin for a few hundred less. These were too nice to pass up. They look great with just about any pair of pants other than black. I even wore them with a pair of dark jeans the other day.
post #5 of 15
...
post #6 of 15
I've got creases on both calfskin and shell cordovan shoes. The types of creases are quite different though. On calfskin shoes, the creases are inward and I get these bunches of tiny little wrinkles. Cordovan shoes have large creases that bulge outwards like on MikeC.'s pictures above.
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Any thoughts on the soles?
post #8 of 15
Well, I always put a full rubber sole protector and but some guys here are dead serious against such blasphemy. I never had any problem although admittedly I only got my better shoes after I joined this forum, which was about a year ago. Much less controversial is to put steel taps on the toe. It's only a little noise and personally I don't mind. If you do, get rubber or nylon taps, but obviously they would wear much sooner.
post #9 of 15
On such beautiful shoes, I'd just get them resoled when they need it, and otherwise not mess with the soles. -Tom
post #10 of 15
They look great. Use shoetrees and the creases won't be a big deal. They look a lot like Alden (BB variety). Do you know if they were the manufacturer. if so they can refurbish them. Also, if you don't mind, where did you buy them?
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
They look great. Use shoetrees and the creases won't be a big deal. They look a lot like Alden (BB variety). Do you know if they were the manufacturer. if so they can refurbish them. Also, if you don't mind, where did you buy them?
They're benchmade by C&J. I got them at the Polo Mansion store on 72nd and Madison. I also found it surprising that Polo is very straightforward about who make their shoes. The sales person showed me a whole binder that explains the process and classification of each model shoe they sell, with the manufacturer of each.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
I can tell they will soon develop a crease just above the toe area; Will shoe trees prevent this
OK, since the question was asked, and please don't take this the wrong way; but, the reason for the heavy crease behind the toe box, as well as the wear at the toe, is that the shoe is too short and wide for your foot. The wear pattern clearly indicates this. Now, you say they are comfortable, so take this for what it's worth, but you can look at the sole and see that the outline of your foot (indicated by the wear) is far inside the dimensions of the shoe. This is VERY common - and frankly the most difficult aspect of fitting shoes. Most customers want a shoe that is shorter and wider than they really should have. It is amazing to me how many guys ask for "10 wide" when really they are a 11.5 narrow. Everyone gets measured at my shop, and we do our best to fit shoes in the proper way, not just what the customer want's. By explaining how a shoe should fit, and therefore wear, 95% leave the store more educated, as well as properly fit. If they feel that we are wrong, no problem, we tried - and they can certainly have what they like. Anyway, there should be a straight line across the sole at the widest point of the shoe, and it should extend across the entire width of the sole. Also, little or no wear should be seen at the tips. It would seem to me that the wear at the tips on these shoes is right OFF the tips - and there is no wear on the edges of the sole. So, did you try a longer/narrower size? Did the salesperson measure your foot? How did they determine size? Did it even come up? Just curious, hope this does not offend you, as you are clearly happy with the shoes. Just thought I would bring it up for discussion.
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
OK, since the question was asked, and please don't take this the wrong way; but, the reason for the heavy crease behind the toe box, as well as the wear at the toe, is that the shoe is too short and wide for your foot.  The wear pattern clearly indicates this.  Now, you say they are comfortable, so take this for what it's worth, but you can look at the sole and see that the outline of your foot (indicated by the wear) is far inside the dimensions of the shoe.  This is VERY common - and frankly the most difficult aspect of fitting shoes.  Most customers want a shoe that is shorter and wider than they really should have.  It is amazing to me how many guys ask for "10 wide" when really they are a 11.5 narrow.  Everyone gets measured at my shop, and we do our best to fit shoes in the proper way, not just what the customer want's.  By explaining how a shoe should fit, and therefore wear, 95% leave the store more educated, as well as properly fit.  If they feel that we are wrong, no problem, we tried - and they can certainly have what they like.   Anyway, there should be a straight line across the sole at the widest point of the shoe, and it should extend across the entire width of the sole.  Also, little or no wear should be seen at the tips.  It would seem to me that the wear at the tips on these shoes is right OFF the tips - and there is no wear on the edges of the sole.  So, did you try a longer/narrower size?  Did the salesperson measure your foot?  How did they determine size?  Did it even come up?   Just curious, hope this does not offend you, as you are clearly happy with the shoes.  Just thought I would bring it up for discussion.
Wow, great insights. Thank you. No, the salesperson did not ask the same questions that you did. I initially asked for a 10.5, which they didn't have, so the salesperson brought up a 10, which I tried on, and felt great and looked good. The deal was done there. Now I'll have more knowledge the next time I buy a pair of shoes.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
OK, since the question was asked, and please don't take this the wrong way; but, the reason for the heavy crease behind the toe box, as well as the wear at the toe, is that the shoe is too short and wide for your foot.  The wear pattern clearly indicates this.  Now, you say they are comfortable, so take this for what it's worth, but you can look at the sole and see that the outline of your foot (indicated by the wear) is far inside the dimensions of the shoe.  This is VERY common - and frankly the most difficult aspect of fitting shoes.  Most customers want a shoe that is shorter and wider than they really should have.  It is amazing to me how many guys ask for "10 wide" when really they are a 11.5 narrow.  Everyone gets measured at my shop, and we do our best to fit shoes in the proper way, not just what the customer want's.  By explaining how a shoe should fit, and therefore wear, 95% leave the store more educated, as well as properly fit.  If they feel that we are wrong, no problem, we tried - and they can certainly have what they like.   Anyway, there should be a straight line across the sole at the widest point of the shoe, and it should extend across the entire width of the sole.  Also, little or no wear should be seen at the tips.  It would seem to me that the wear at the tips on these shoes is right OFF the tips - and there is no wear on the edges of the sole.  So, did you try a longer/narrower size?  Did the salesperson measure your foot?  How did they determine size?  Did it even come up?   Just curious, hope this does not offend you, as you are clearly happy with the shoes.  Just thought I would bring it up for discussion.
Rider, Your comments resonated with me. Using the foot measuring device, I am a 10.5 D or an 11D. However, I tried some 11.5 Cs and even a 12B and the fit was SO much more comfortable. What is your opinion of the use of such a device as the primary or sole method of determining shoe size? Is is frequently used in an incorrect manner, or are there particular foot types where one should adjust the measurements. I dont want you to lose business but would you be willing to jot down a few lines about how to try out a shoe for fit? Some items - How much room should there be behind the heel? How important is this. etc. Definately a contender for HOF. -
post #15 of 15
Quote:
What is your opinion of the use of such a device as the primary or sole method of determining shoe size? Is is frequently used in an incorrect manner, or are there particular foot types where one should adjust the measurements.
The Brannock device is very effective for determining shoe size, if used correctly and you know how to adjust some types of feet for different footwear. First, you should always be seated while being measured. This is a point of contention right now, as the Brannock Device Company now publishes that the devise can be used either sitting or standing. However, I e-mailed the company asking when this idea changed (we always were trained to measure sitting down, by their own manual), and they responded that they are happy just to have stores use the thing, and it's just easier to let the stores decide the manner in which they are used. Better mostly right than getting too technical. OK, but the proper way to measure a customers foot is while they are seated and you are at the bench with the device on the footrest. If a salesperson does not do this, you will know they have not been trained too well. Period, paragraph. Most stores instruct salespeople to use the device as a tool to sell - if the customer takes their shoes off, there is a better chance they will buy a new one. Sad but true. Second, the most important measurement is the ball measurement. This determines the fit of the arch as well. If the ball of the foot is mis-placed, than the arch is too - in most every case (there are, of course, exceptions). Next, the width is determined. The salesperson will move the bar over to the outside of the foot and the lines will indicate width. This is what changes more than any measurement depending on the last the shoe that you try on is made from. I can only assume that, over time, shoe manufacturing has changed in this regard (girth of each listed size in this case) since the Brannock device was invented. One thing I do know, when width changes, the bottom of the shoe does not really change, the girth (volume) does. Maybe in the past this was different; I can not say. Anyway, it takes experience, but I find that the wider measurements need to be added to - D to 3A are pretty accurate. The very last part of the foot to consider is the toe measurement. Only if there is a longer measurement here than the ball of the foot should the results be considered. I can't really tell you when the last time I saw a foot with this result, so pretty rare. So, as you can see, it is pretty straight forward, and accurate with 'better' footwear. My shop is pretty much Allen Edmonds and above, in regards to quality, so that is my reference here. I can pull A/E sizes just about straight off the scale. Now, the more complicated part in fitting shoes is getting the proper type/cut of shoe for the particular shape/needs of the foot in question. As an example, this morning I fit a customer in Allen Edmonds shoes on the 5 last and the 0 last. He had been wearing the Park Ave. for years, and was happy - except for the 'break in period'. Well, in A/E shoes, there should not be a 'break in period' outside of simply getting the insole the soften into the gait of the customer. As an aside, this is why I prefer A/E to Alden, much better insole - the only factory I know of that cuts insoles in the factory. Alden uses a much thinner, pre-fab insole. Anyway, this gentleman had measured an easy 8.5D but he had a pretty high instep, with a moderately high arch. He had been wearing the Park Ave. in 8.5 E. The shoes showed un-even wear and extensive creasing. Instead of fetching an 8.5E and sending him on his way, we explained the need for a Blutcher pattern as being more consistent with his foot shape - and we could get a better fit. So, he took 3 pair of shoes, all Blutcher pattern, on 3 different lasts, in his proper size, and commented about how much more room there was in them. There was not, they just fit him better. One of the shoes was on the same last as the Park Ave., you see. Also, the new 0 last from Edmonds is very different in dimension than the more popular 5,7, and 4 lasts. In this shoe, he needed a 9D. The girth of the last is 1/4 inch more, but the length is 3/8 shorter, per same labeled size. Bottom line, the store personnel have to know what they fit. Finally, remember one more thing; shoe manufacturers change the toe shape of a model based on pattern or the prevailing style more than fit. If you consistently seek shoes where the ball of your foot rests comfortably in the 'ball' of the shoe, and your arch has a nice clean 'hug' to it (and I don't mean on the bottom, but in the line), you should have a good fit. Heels should, obviously, fit with a good grip, but keep in mind that sometimes, a properly fit shoe will slip in the heel slightly due to the insole, or a particularly stiff outsole. In many cases, this is not the result of a bad fit, just that the leather needs to conform to the foot. Just depends. There is lots more, but I got to get now, so i'll add to this later.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › First pair of shoes