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I can't stand italian clothing - Page 3

post #31 of 111
Your a joke. I'd really like to see what you look like in your American Ralph Lauren, and Gieves and Hawkes. (A Joke, just like I said before) One who thinks that Ozwald Botang looks better than is possibly blind. Show me some inovative style in British clothing; take a single look at Gucci a/w 04-05. Is there even a comparision? No, I think not. America, do not get me started, we like to wear things under sweaters, we like to wear things under shirts, we like to wear things ten sizes too big. Sorry boss, but you aint got an argument. Whenever I see someone with a t-shirt under their shirt I feel like taking out my Purdys and oh dear....
post #32 of 111
Horace, Out of curiosity, are you the same Horace that I see from time to time in the Neiman Marcus store in SF?
post #33 of 111
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Whenever I see someone with a t-shirt under their shirt I feel like taking out my Purdys and oh dear....
With your tastes, one would think that you'd own a Berretta.
post #34 of 111
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(Styleman @ 14 Oct. 2004, 11:15) Whenever I see someone with a t-shirt under their shirt I feel like taking out my Purdys and oh dear....
With your tastes, one would think that you'd own a Berretta.
Clothing and Guns, a different world I will always stick to Browning or Purdys.
post #35 of 111
No more Italian. Stop it. Only Anglo-American or British cut clothing. You realize, of course, that even Saville Row is incorporating Italian styling into their clothes, and vice versa. In fact, I think one could argue that there soon will be no such thing as an "Italian" suit or "English" suit, but rather a "European" suit.
post #36 of 111
I became interested in clothing in 1959, when I had a part-time job at a campus shop in New Orleans. We sold traditional natural shoulder ivy league clothing. (It became my favorite and it still is. I still wear some sack suits and I think they look o.k.; I am not fat-5' 11" and 170lbs. I like Savile Row as much, however). The year after I started college, 1960, a two year fad began for some people; so-called "Continental" suits; supposedly of Italian or French design. They came in iridescent, nubby silks; sometimes in lime green or purple. They were extremely narrow in lapels, leg width, shoulders, everything. Think early Beetles. Right then, I got a bad taste in my mouth for Italian. My tastes haven't changed much, though I do like some Isaia and Kiton. That is all the Italian that I like, however. Brioni is way over-rated IMO, and I am not impressed by Zenga. I have had no experience with Attolini, but am not awed by Borelli (but should be, for the prices). I think Versace, D&G, Prada and Gucci are the perfect clothes for the Hollywood types; all show (but dreadful "show," IMO) and no substance (poor quality, IMO). One thing that has not been mentioned about traditional natural shoulder ivy league clothing is that it is loved by the old-money crowd, the husbands of junior leaguers. I do not want to sound like a snob, but in my school days, 1959-1965, there seemed to be three types of college and law school students that I came across, satorically speaking. There were the old-money, high society, "old South" types, all of whom seemed to wear traditional natural shoulder ivy league clothing. There were the more middle-class "Yankees," who sometimes enrolled in Southern colleges (the sons of wealthier Northern families did not come south to go to school). The ones whom we got usually wore the "Continental" suits and clothing mentioned above; think John Travolta in "Saturday Night Fever." Then, there were the "Farmers," actually Cajuns, for those of at Tulane. They sort of dressed like farmers, actually. I guess all of these experiences impressed me at an early age and contributed toward my life-long prejudice against Italian clothing; not only from a style standpoint, but also from a snobbish "class" standpoint. I do try to be open-minded, but even while thinking that way, I honestly think that most of the Italian stuff is either bizarre and dreadful looking or is way over-priced for the quality. Norman Hilton made the best traditional natural shoulder ivy league clothing ever made and it cost 1/3-1/2 as much as Kiton. No one has replaced it; Martin Greenfield comes closest, but it is not very close. I love fine English shoes and Alden; I am not generally impressed by Italian shoes; I think 95% of them are weird.
post #37 of 111
stylistically speaking, I dont know why someone would chose the American ivy league style of suit over any other. I dont find it particularly flattering on anyone. Its boxy, shapeless, devoid of any style whatsoever. I live in CT, fairfield county, the heart of this style, and it just looks so boring. I understand the heritage of the look, and I guess if that appeals to you, fine. But why look so boring just so you can appear "old money". wouldnt someone rather wear something that actually flatters one's physique? seems a bit narrowminded to hold a grudge from 1959.
post #38 of 111
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seems a bit narrowminded to hold a grudge from 1959.
I agree.   Furthermore, with regard to Jerrysfriend's post, I don't see how you associate the early "Beetles" with an Italian look - that is about as British as you can get. True, it is more Carnaby Street than Savile Row, but still certainly not Italian.
post #39 of 111
and if we are gonna hold a good grudge, cant exclude the rest of the world. hmm, the italians are out because of a suit you saw in 1960. gotta throw out american cars, the edsel was so ugly its ruined me for those. those british deer stalker hats are pretty silly, better hold a grudge against them too for everything that has evolved since in that country. never liked that whole crocodile dundee look, have to throw out anything that might come out of australia. sombreros are silly, nothing good must be from mexico in that case. hmm, let me think. cant forget about the french, for a variety of reasons. i could go on forever. i guess the point is keep an open mind, no matter what you age is. sorry for the sarcasm.
post #40 of 111
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post #41 of 111
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those british deer stalker hats are pretty silly...
Hey, I like those.
post #42 of 111
In terms of designer fashions Italy produces by far a most comprehenisve selection. England whilst boasting such notables as Vivienne Westwood or Alexander McQueen trails far behind the Gucci's, and Fendi's of the world. America can boast of no exclusively high end designer company. Donna Karan, and Ralph Lauren do not count since they have cheap diffusion lines. Calvin Klein perhaps might edge in with his Black Label, and Collection lines but really, those are shown in Milan. British fashion is far more bizzare than Italian fashion.
post #43 of 111
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America can boast of no exclusively high end designer company.
No, but America, IMHO, has some of the best streetwear and up and comers (esp. in casualwear) in the world.
post #44 of 111
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Out of curiosity, are you the same Horace that I see from time to time in the Neiman Marcus store in SF
Considering that Horace of Neimans SF is an Isaia specialist, I don't think so As an aside, if anyone is looking for a good salesman to work with at the SF Neimans, Horace is highly recommended. He is a great guy. An extremely general question, but if I was forced to pick I would go with Italy for suits, shirts, ties and shoes. In the suits, shirts, and ties category there is absolutely no competition, IMO. I hear the arguments for English shoes, but if it weren't for Edward Green, I don't think England would even be in the running. Keep in mind that most of the Italian shoes offered in the US are horrid because they are made specifically for the US market. Vass makes great shoes, but I can't pit one workshop against the whole nation of Italy
post #45 of 111
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i think all of us here dislike ugly clothes regardless of origin.but i still feel that overall italy has the most beautiful designs and styling.
[quote] My distaste for Italian clothing arises from the beauty part.  Aspiring to beauty is unwholesome, even suspect, in an American man.  Unlike Horace, I would not abjure all things Italian, but the textiles and men's clothing have become too refined, too sophisticated to accord with the American ideal of physical comfort and social invisibility .
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